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Legalizing ALL Drugs
5186 cr points
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26 / Texas
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Posted 10/11/13
Id rather not let cartels further flood our streets while continuing to subject their home countries to brutality. I dont think the private sector could ever out compete illegal and or horrid unregulated practices. Just look at sweatshops. With a blanket ban it is much easier to keep it all out rather than tryng to trace where the crap came from. Easier being subjective because oh so much is still getting through.I do however have a problem with throwing dumb kids in jail over posession of something as stupid as marijuana. That doesnt solve anything. The world would be a nicer place if people didnt think drugs were cool. Not much nicer, but every little bit helps.

Ps- the drinking age should be 18. If you can be drafted for war you should have every right as an american available to you that you are fighting to protect.
5212 cr points
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25 / M / Minneapolis
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Posted 12/28/13
To those who think every drug should be legalized...you must never have experienced what addiction is personally and how it destroyed one's humanity. That is why there is a war on drugs in the first place, cause of the addiction and physical harm involved.

In the end it all comes down to self control, which most Americans are horrible at (including myself ). Just look at alcohol, that used to be illegal and now it is legal....look at all the drunk driving accidents involved. Should that still be illegal?

49109 cr points
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Posted 12/28/13 , edited 12/30/13
In 1981PO Morphine was 2.50 cents a hundred. We'd crush the tablets and add vodka and aromatic spirits and sell it to nursing homes for $80.00 a litre as Brompton's solution/cocktail. The prescription process is driven by greed with the caveat that a licensed medical professional has to prescribe it.Legalizing Schedule I and II's is madness. Decriminalize possession , and treat addicts .You think medical costs are high now ,(both monetarily and humanitarian)? Legalize all drugs and see what happens is just plain madness...
23684 cr points
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M / Fort Bragg, NC
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Posted 12/29/13 , edited 12/29/13
yea bruh lez legalize meth and krokodil, make da world so much better

YA DIG?

cuz I dont dig

Posted 12/29/13 , edited 12/29/13
Far less crime as a result. That being a big no-duh since it would be legal. The rate of use would surely decrease, since the reason some people will do drugs is to defy authority.
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26 / F
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Posted 12/30/13 , edited 12/30/13

sevenhells wrote:Far less crime as a result. That being a big no-duh since it would be legal. The rate of use would surely decrease, since the reason some people will do drugs is to defy authority.
Yes, well... Love, this is completely wrong. The notion that legalization drugs consequently leads to less crime isn't accepted even by proponents of drug legalization.

The Lancet, the oldest and most respected medical journal on the world, published a report back in 2010 in which they measured the social harm of all drugs and attempted to determine which drug was the most harmful to society [1]. The result: alcohol was the most harmful drug on society, surpassing heroine and cocaine, due to the ubiquity of alcohol's use.

Additionally, Pointek et. all (2012) [2] has shown that as perceived ease of access to certain drugs (in the case of the linked article, cannabis) increases, use also increases. Or, more simply: if a drug is easier to get it's use seems to increase as well.

In general, the rate of use increases, not decreases, as a result of legalization. And while some people may due drugs to "defy authority", this overwhelmingly is not the case for the majority of drug users.

** I don't want this misconstrued as tacit approval of current drug policy, it's just that total legalization is also a terrible idea.

-

[1] - http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61462-6/abstract
[2] - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23299007
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19 / M / Maryland
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Posted 12/30/13 , edited 12/30/13
Well if I had to respond to the thread, no. I'm not for the legalization of all drugs. That being said I am for marijuana being legalized in a manner similar to alcohol or tobacco.

If it was regulated, it would be a lot safer, produced in a controlled environment instead of a shady lab somewhere. It would ensure that the drugs aren't laced.

Sin taxes would probably be placed, which could raise money for things like education and drug rehabilitation programs.

Billions of dollars formerly spent on cracking down on marijuana could go to the investigation of violent crimes.

Lives would no longer have to be ruined simply for possession.

We could cut down greatly on prison overcrowding.

Cartels would lose massive amounts of profits and influence, which would reduce trafficking related violence not only in America but around the world.

Posted 12/31/13 , edited 12/31/13
Legalizing marijuana will fund illegal rugs

Edit: lol rugs. hahaha. love it.
Posted 12/31/13 , edited 12/31/13

Sakurako_Kimino wrote:


sevenhells wrote:Far less crime as a result. That being a big no-duh since it would be legal. The rate of use would surely decrease, since the reason some people will do drugs is to defy authority.
Yes, well... Love, this is completely wrong. The notion that legalization drugs consequently leads to less crime isn't accepted even by proponents of drug legalization.

The Lancet, the oldest and most respected medical journal on the world, published a report back in 2010 in which they measured the social harm of all drugs and attempted to determine which drug was the most harmful to society [1]. The result: alcohol was the most harmful drug on society, surpassing heroine and cocaine, due to the ubiquity of alcohol's use.

Additionally, Pointek et. all (2012) [2] has shown that as perceived ease of access to certain drugs (in the case of the linked article, cannabis) increases, use also increases. Or, more simply: if a drug is easier to get it's use seems to increase as well.

In general, the rate of use increases, not decreases, as a result of legalization. And while some people may due drugs to "defy authority", this overwhelmingly is not the case for the majority of drug users.

** I don't want this misconstrued as tacit approval of current drug policy, it's just that total legalization is also a terrible idea.

-

[1] - http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)61462-6/abstract
[2] - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23299007


Firstly, you are way off base. When I said it leads to less crime, that is precisely it. Because if something is legal, then doing it isn't criminal. And honestly, how many people do you see committing crimes just to spite a system? Very many and that is part of the reason anyone does anything towards being taken more seriously by others. Some do it for the cool factor of having the power of defying power. Now, I do acknowledge other reasons why people break laws. Whether it be ignorance, on some purpose of ill-gotten gains, or maybe an undefined reason left forever unknown because they couldn't find who committed the crime to get an answer from them.

Also, alcohol is still not considered by many to be a drug. It is arguable as to whether it is. Some classify it as a depressant and some, such as the law, separate drugs from alcohol for whatever reasons they do. Until it is universal, alcohol can't technically be called a drug.

Lastly, do not refer to me as "love," as I've not a clue as to the truth of your real personage based on real evidence.
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22 / M / Somewhere outside...
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Posted 12/31/13
legalizing all drugs wont help. for me. lol. just want to answer
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26 / F
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Posted 12/31/13

sevenhells wrote:
Firstly, you are way off base. When I said it leads to less crime, that is precisely it. Because if something is legal, then doing it isn't criminal. And honestly, how many people do you see committing crimes just to spite a system? Very many and that is part of the reason anyone does anything towards being taken more seriously by others. Some do it for the cool factor of having the power of defying power. Now, I do acknowledge other reasons why people break laws. Whether it be ignorance, on some purpose of ill-gotten gains, or maybe an undefined reason left forever unknown because they couldn't find who committed the crime to get an answer from them.

Also, alcohol is still not considered by many to be a drug. It is arguable as to whether it is. Some classify it as a depressant and some, such as the law, separate drugs from alcohol for whatever reasons they do. Until it is universal, alcohol can't technically be called a drug.

Lastly, do not refer to me as "love," as I've not a clue as to the truth of your real personage based on real evidence.
Love, I appreciate the response, but I would implore you to read what I originally posted.

You say that legalizing drugs leads to decreased crime rates. I, in turn, presented a large body of evidence (for the links see the original post) that suggests that increased drug use is correlated with increased violent and property crime rates, and as ease of access to certain drugs increases, drug use increases as well.

It is possible to burn your lips on a crack pipe, responsibly, in the privacy of your own home; in general this does not appear to be the case. Drug use is correlated with increased criminal offense rates and increased instances of antisocial behavior.

Also... depressants are still classified as drugs. And if you disagree with its classification as such, I would call, again, to the Lancet's article (previously linked) that classifies alcohol a drug as well. ("Alcohol is the most harmful drug...").
Posted 12/31/13

Sakurako_Kimino wrote:


sevenhells wrote:
Firstly, you are way off base. When I said it leads to less crime, that is precisely it. Because if something is legal, then doing it isn't criminal. And honestly, how many people do you see committing crimes just to spite a system? Very many and that is part of the reason anyone does anything towards being taken more seriously by others. Some do it for the cool factor of having the power of defying power. Now, I do acknowledge other reasons why people break laws. Whether it be ignorance, on some purpose of ill-gotten gains, or maybe an undefined reason left forever unknown because they couldn't find who committed the crime to get an answer from them.

Also, alcohol is still not considered by many to be a drug. It is arguable as to whether it is. Some classify it as a depressant and some, such as the law, separate drugs from alcohol for whatever reasons they do. Until it is universal, alcohol can't technically be called a drug.

Lastly, do not refer to me as "love," as I've not a clue as to the truth of your real personage based on real evidence.
Love, I appreciate the response, but I would implore you to read what I originally posted.

You say that legalizing drugs leads to decreased crime rates. I, in turn, presented a large body of evidence (for the links see the original post) that suggests that increased drug use is correlated with increased violent and property crime rates, and as ease of access to certain drugs increases, drug use increases as well.

It is possible to burn your lips on a crack pipe, responsibly, in the privacy of your own home; in general this does not appear to be the case. Drug use is correlated with increased criminal offense rates and increased instances of antisocial behavior.

Also... depressants are still classified as drugs. And if you disagree with its classification as such, I would call, again, to the Lancet's article (previously linked) that classifies alcohol a drug as well. ("Alcohol is the most harmful drug...").



>2013
>believing anything on the internet
Reymma 
36036 cr points
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32 / M
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Posted 12/31/13
The case for decriminalising drugs is that prohibitionism does more harm than good. Addicts are treated as criminals instead of patients, and are cut off from the medical support and rehabilitation they so need. Whether on the streets or in prison, they become locked into a cycle of crime and addiction that the police can at best hide from view. The nature of addiction means they will find it whatever the cost, and since the trade is illegal there is no way to even guarantee that what they get is not more toxic than the actual drug.

We associate drugs with crime, but that's because the law forces them together. If they were decriminalised, they would be associated with health problems.

And from the point of view of state resources, current policy wastes a lot of police effort and incarceration space on people who are of no real threat to the public.

Then there is the question of how harmful the drugs really are. Current policy just lumps them together. It's been said that marijuana only acts as a "gateway drug" because once users realise it isn't as harmful as they've been told, they start to wonder if the same is true for harder drugs. Marijuana is no more harmful than alcohol, and better than tobacco.

Also, warnings against drugs coming from the government always seem insincere. Since the stuff is outside the state, of course it wants the citizens to stay away from it. If the trade were legal and regulated, and hence making money for the state, then they could be taken more seriously.

I hate these drugs almost as much as I hate smoking, but the softer drugs need to be legal and regulated on the same scale as alcohol, and the harder ones decriminalised (so the police can confiscate them, but not punish those with personal amounts).
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M / USA
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Posted 12/31/13
There is no easy solution for legalization of any drug. The drug trafficking market would take a big hit and that would piss off a lot of people. Illegality raises prices which leads to profits. Many drugs are EXTREMELY dangerous to one's health and can really mess someone up or kill them. It can also severely alter someone's mental state or mood and cause them to harm/kill another individual or cause property damage. A system for regulating distribution of drugs won't be easy to manage either and could be very costly. Licenses to manufacture, grow, and distribute drugs would have to be created and proper precautions such as back ground checks would have to be in place. Legality would increase the chance of distribution to minors and enter the school systems which is another risk. Another problem would be what to do with criminals in jail who broke now legal laws. Do we let them rot or take them out?

However, if the government lowered our taxes by transferring some of that tax over to people who buy drugs (basically put a tax on the purchase of drugs), that would be beneficial to the average American and the country's funding. Legality could also lower police corruption and drug abuse. There are theories and speculation that legality will lower crime rates and reduce casualties from drug wars and trafficking. Certain drugs are medically beneficial and could treat one thought to be incurable diseases.

My opinion: Certain drugs should only be legalized (less hazardous ones), people need distribution/manufacturing licenses, increased screenings in schools, and taxes on the drugs.
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20 / F / On Earth
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Posted 1/17/14 , edited 1/17/14
I am personally against legalizing all of the drugs, because it just means that they will be more crazy, high people on the streets. As for medical marijuana, I am on the fence. I think that if it is doctor prescribed and taken with caution and responsibility, it can be done.
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