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21 / M / California
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Posted 5/29/13
Here, we will discuss true facts about the cashew.

The cashew, when not in "Planter's Mixed Nuts" form, is a boxing glove-shaped seed attached to an upside-down, heart-shaped fruit called the cashew apple... Which grows on a cashew tree. The largest cashew tree is about 81,000 square feet which is large enough that if you were to remove the leaves, fruit, and tree, there would be enough space for 81,000 square feet of some other foliage. It is said that the fruit of the cashew tree is quite yummy, but only those who live near a cashew tree, and those rich enough to go to one can be certain because no one is rich enough to figure out how to transport said fruit.
While the cashew apple can be easily enjoyed, the cashew itself is a bit trickier to get to, due to the fact that its skin contains a deadly deadly neurotoxin similar to that of poison ivy and the skin of mangos- the difference being you can eat mango skin and not die, but it is kind of gross. This is the reason why you never see an unshelled cashew in with the walnuts around Christmas time unless, of course, the stocker is a sadist. People who live near cashew trees sometimes eat the little boxing gloves raw, which is crazy because they’ve spent most of their fruiting period bathed in sticky people killer juice.
Most people aren’t allergic to cashews, which is a good thing, considering how much work it takes to make them edible, and we are the only species who enjoys cashews. This is due to the fact that other primates and animals in general are too stupid to figure out how to peel and roast the cashew to make it edible. So the next time you’re eating cashews, do it in front of a lesser primate and say “This is what makes me better than you.” But not in front of an uncaged, non-space faring chimp because it’ll probably eat your face and steal your cashews.
Posted 5/29/13
Pistachios.
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Posted 5/29/13
Looks like a nut to me.
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15 / M / A Wall in the Heart
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Posted 5/29/13
Actually, some animals have immunity to the toxins of the cashew, so it does not matter how stupid they are- as long as they manage to get the cashew in the first place. There also some species that make attempts to peel the skin off, and though they may not be successful, some lesser primates have learned that the cashew must be peeled. In addition, certain insects will stick near the poison to protect itself from predators. I think.
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Posted 5/29/13 , edited 5/29/13
Cashews are a great source of protein (5grams in a ¼ cup), fibre, vitamin B and many other nutrients.

Cashews have a high fat content, which means that if they are left at room temperature, they won’t stay fresh for long. It is best to store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator. That way they will last around 4 to 6 months. You can also freeze them for about 6 to 8 months.

Cashew nuts, (raw):

23% Carbs
66% Fats
11% Protein

Cashews are high in calories. 100 g of nuts provide 553 calories. They are packed with soluble dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals and numerous health-promoting phyto-chemicals.

The cashew tree is native to Brazil’s Amazon rain forest, which spread all over the world by Portuguese explorers. Today, it is cultivated commercially in Brazil, Vietnam, and India and in many African countries.

They are rich in “heart-friendly” monounsaturated-fatty acids like oleic, and palmitoleic acids. Cashew nuts are very rich source of essential minerals. Minerals, especially manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc and selenium are concentrated in these nuts.

Cashews are also rich in many essential vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), riboflavin, and thiamin (vitamin B-1).
1mirg 
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Posted 5/29/13 , edited 5/29/13
Uh....cashew's are those nut looking things...right?
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Posted 5/29/13 , edited 5/29/13

1mirg wrote:

Uh....cashew's are those nut looking things...right?




Yes. A pile of cashews.



Cashew apple.
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Posted 5/29/13
Cashews take a lot of work.
Peanuts are not nuts.
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20 / M / Maryland
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Posted 5/29/13
This was actually quite informative and humurous. Good job
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30 / M / "Spaaaaace!"
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Posted 5/29/13

Lethargic_leopard_Seal wrote:
So the next time you’re eating cashews, do it in front of a lesser primate and say “This is what makes me better than you.” But not in front of an uncaged, non-space faring chimp because it’ll probably eat your face and steal your cashews.


LOL, this was awesome and I learned something. Thank you.
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23 / M / This Dying World
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Posted 5/29/13
you just told me that the human race is smarter than most animes because I have the ability to eat a nut...

so what about the animals capable of eating us, but we can't eat them?
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Posted 5/29/13

minatothegreatjiraiya wrote:

Peanuts are not nuts.


That's correct. Peanuts are legumes.


While “nut” is in their name, peanuts are in fact legumes. Peanuts actually grow underground, as opposed to nuts like walnuts, almonds, etc. that grow on trees (and are sometimes referred to as "tree nuts").

Peanuts, along with beans and peas, belong to the single plant family, Leguminosae. Legumes are edible seeds enclosed in pods. As a group, they provide the best source of concentrated protein in the plant kingdom. While their physical structure and nutritional benefits more closely resemble that of other legumes, their use in diets and cuisines more closely resembles that of nuts. (http://www.peanut-institute.org/peanut-facts/)


Also, bananas are berries.
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Posted 5/29/13

Hairbelly wrote:


minatothegreatjiraiya wrote:

Peanuts are not nuts.


That's correct. Peanuts are legumes.


While “nut” is in their name, peanuts are in fact legumes. Peanuts actually grow underground, as opposed to nuts like walnuts, almonds, etc. that grow on trees (and are sometimes referred to as "tree nuts").

Peanuts, along with beans and peas, belong to the single plant family, Leguminosae. Legumes are edible seeds enclosed in pods. As a group, they provide the best source of concentrated protein in the plant kingdom. While their physical structure and nutritional benefits more closely resemble that of other legumes, their use in diets and cuisines more closely resembles that of nuts. (http://www.peanut-institute.org/peanut-facts/)


Also, bananas are berries.

Dat logic..

Cashews.. is there more to say on the topic? what he said^ :D

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Posted 5/29/13

Hairbelly wrote:

Also, bananas are berries.


:o I CALL BS
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Posted 5/29/13

Hairbelly wrote:


minatothegreatjiraiya wrote:

Peanuts are not nuts.


That's correct. Peanuts are legumes.


While “nut” is in their name, peanuts are in fact legumes. Peanuts actually grow underground, as opposed to nuts like walnuts, almonds, etc. that grow on trees (and are sometimes referred to as "tree nuts").

Peanuts, along with beans and peas, belong to the single plant family, Leguminosae. Legumes are edible seeds enclosed in pods. As a group, they provide the best source of concentrated protein in the plant kingdom. While their physical structure and nutritional benefits more closely resemble that of other legumes, their use in diets and cuisines more closely resembles that of nuts. (http://www.peanut-institute.org/peanut-facts/)


Also, bananas are berries.


And the banana plant is an herb.
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