Looking for fantasy
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Posted 6/20/13
I've been on a fantasy kick lately, and I'm looking for stuff to read that are not parts of 10 book epics. I like stand alone books, or even 3 or 4 book series.

Any recommendations?
Posted 6/20/13
Prince of Thorns.

/thread
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46 / M / KC
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Posted 6/21/13
"The Emperor's Soul" by Brandon Sanderson is a short, stand-alone book that I loved.
"Sasha" by Joel Shepherd. It's the first book in a trilogy, I believe.
If you like urban fantasy, you might want to try "Discount Armageddon" by Seanan McGuire.
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Posted 6/25/13
. . . 5 book series? Soulless by Gail Carriger. Steampunk/Mystery/Romance/Supernatural awesome blend.

2/3 books out of Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor. Modern setting, Prague and Morocco + other-world stuff. Angels and demons, sort of. Really great series.

Also The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern.

And The Strange Adventures of Rangergirl by Tim Pratt. I would recommend his Marla Mason series but you said you don't want longer things and that's 7 or so books, so far.
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Posted 6/27/13 , edited 6/27/13
Can I meet you half way? Steven Erikson's A Tale of the Malazan Book of the Fallen is ten books long, but they're all individual novels (except for the last two, which are a pair). Basically while each one advances the overall story of the world in some way, it also has its own complete set of internal story arcs, which you then line up end-to-end.

(It might not sound like it, but this structure really is different from A Song of Ice and Fire or The Wheel of Time, etc.).

The first two novels especially are very differentiated as they follow two different Malazan campaigns on two different continents (the first in Genabackis and the second in Seven Cities). At that point you've been introduced to most of the cast, and been emotionally devastated by the end of Deadhouse Gates. The next eight novels proceed from there.

Fair warning though: Erikson is a rather enigmatic writer. The magic system he's devised is incredibly rich and complex, but info dumps are few and far between. Most of what you learn about it, and many other things in this world, you learn by picking out of conversations or current events. But this also means you're always learning new things.

I tend to dislike most long fantasy series because it feels like most of the information you're interested in is info dumped early, and the rest of the series is just filler between the actually significant events which leaves you feeling like you should be rushing through the boring bits, or you finish a novel and feel like barely anything actually happened.

But that doesn't apply to Erikson's work, at least for me. You learn to slow down and really absorb everything he's saying because all of it is valuable and in some way enhances your understanding of what is going on and who these people actually are. And he's notable for having a huge cast of characters which can withstand this kind of intense scrutiny.

But another warning: the first book is definitely the hardest one to read. I don't think it's bad (I've read it four times now, and the last three times were amazing), it's mostly due to acclimating to Erikson's style and feeling a bit disjointed because you're not entirely sure what's going on and what information or characters you should be paying attention to.

Additionally it's also the most exclusively character-focused of the books. It occurs during a lull in the Genabackis campaign, so the story revolves very intently around the specific actions of a relatively small cast of characters. This can leave you feeling rather claustrophobic, and occasionally bored since you haven't yet connected with the characters.

And also occasionally confused, because a plethora of things are happening all around you which are rarely explained in the moment. Including how their magic works, since it's obviously fairly complex and defined (but takes awhile to fully understand). And gods will intervene in mortal affairs with a fair amount of frequency, although few at first.

Deadhouse Gates begins in much the same way, but eventually transitions from the story being told from the position of people taking orders to those giving the orders. Which is more or less how the rest of the series plays out. I'm close to rambling at this point, but basically these are really good books that are each valuable in themselves.

It'd be a bad idea to mess with the order in which you read them, since that'd upset the overarching plot and the later novels assume you've read the previous ones, but after reading one you're not left with "I have to read the next one to find out what happens," more than "That just happened; now I can read the next one to find out what happens next."

Edit: Basically I can feel confident in bringing this series up because even if you read a book or two and decide you don't like it, since the books themselves are more or less self-contained I won't feel like I just wasted a chunk of your life. At least in the beginning; some later books become fairly more complexly intertwined with advancing various plot threads.


Other than that, Brandon Sanderson is a pretty prolific writer and I really liked The Way of Kings.

So based on that, if any of his books catch your eye I'm fairly certain they'd be a good read.
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Posted 6/27/13 , edited 6/27/13
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman, is a fantastic stand-alone read. It's a short book, about 200-something-odd pages, and is one of the most original settings I've ever read, wherein present-day London (and it's implied to be the same case in other major cities), certain people have "slipped through the cracks" of reality, and end up in a parallel world that intersects, but never really integrates with the world we know.
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Posted 6/29/13 , edited 6/29/13
I second Neverwhere. I would also recommend William Gibson's Neuromancer although it certainly is more science fiction than it is fantasy--which is really all dependent upon one's definition of fantasy.
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Posted 6/30/13 , edited 6/30/13
Just a heads up that I've (just moments ago) created a new thread specifically for recommendations, like we have in other forums. Please use that for new recommendation requests going forward.

http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-809929/recommend-me-a-bookcomics-non-manga-read-first-post
Posted 7/11/13

Ink-e wrote:

Prince of Thorns.

/thread


Give me it
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Posted 7/14/13
All of Brandon Sanderson

All of Patrick Rothfuss

I read a lot, but those are my favorites!
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Posted 7/14/13
Locking and closing because this really is now covered by the recommendations thread, and there's no discussion happening here.
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