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Why is make-up viewed so negatively?
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20 / F / Washington
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Posted 6/26/13 , edited 6/26/13
Why is it viewed so negatively? It shouldn't be. Because you wear make-up doesn't make you fake or superfical. It's the same for tattoos. Why do people get tattoos? As most people see it, our body is a blank canvas and you can create what you want with it. I mean you like wearing clothes that make you feel cool or pretty right? then what's the difference in wearing make-up? I wear it because I feel pretty (Also I wear it because I'm actress) and I feel good about myself/ I' happy with the way I look without it and I can live going out without it too. Wearing make up is like making your face art is as the same for wearing clothes and having tattoos.

-So what are you're thoughts?


I looked to see if it's a dupicate but couldn't find it. So if it is please lock it, thank you!~
Posted 6/26/13 , edited 6/26/13
because its fake it till you make it

don't see men plastering them self in dead cells and plastic just to hide there face under 3mm of dust , cells , and all the other junk they put in it (some men do but most don't )

ever way you wearing a 1 million+ old animal on your face


natural skin is what i like


wearing clothes well that's to Keep you warm and to hide body parts.
having tattoos. if its on the face then its a no and i don't like it .

its a face thing . but faking a face you not got is lie
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26 / M / Las Vegas
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Posted 6/26/13
my thought is you just made this post to let the crunchy world universe know that you're an actress.

the only reason make up should be seen as a bad thing is when the person who is wearing it is too young. For example, little kids in pageants. Thats a whole other can of worms.
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Posted 6/26/13
Tattoos are permanent markings from temporary feelings.
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22 / M / SoCal
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Posted 6/26/13
The difference how I see it as is that a tattoo is an expression of something whereas make-up is used to cover over what one deems to be imperfections. I can see your point that to you make-up is an art form and can be used as an expression but I feel that most girls use make-up to try to enhance their looks by hiding features. For me personally, I prefer a girl who wears less make-up.
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22 / M / Houston, Tx
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Posted 6/26/13
Just avoid make-up abuse. Less is more, but that's just my opinion.
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27 / M / San Diego
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Posted 6/26/13
I dont mind Makeup, as long as it isn't overly done I think is good. same with tattoos, Moderation is key me thinks.
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23 / F / New York City
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Posted 6/26/13
I have a legitimate question to those who say that changing your appearance is a lie.

What truth is it concealing and why is it bad to conceal that truth? What importance does the truth being concealed really have?

Putting aside the fact that it's totally none of your business what other people chose to put on their bodies...

Creating a certain appearance for yourself is a form of self-expression. You are taking your physical form - the first thing people see about you - and crafting it to fit how you see your personality within. With the symbols of clothing, makeup, hairstyling, etc., you're making a statement about what sort of person you are to everyone who sees you. Aesthetic tastes do correspond with outlook and values - for instance, you would say that an optimistic outlook was "bright and sunny," while an outlook more inclined towards somber contemplation of mortality and things like that would be "dark". Gothic subculture tends toward the latter, which is why a lot of that aesthetic ends up in dark colors. Such things are linked in the human mind. It's not some oppressive "mainstream" that links them, it's just psychology.
How is "the way your face looks when you wake up" a more important truth to share with the world than your core values and attitude?

Also, where do you draw the line between what's "fake" and what's "natural"? Say there's a person who normally doesn't wear makeup, but today the store they went to only had tinted chapstick so they have that on now. Would you look at them and suddenly declare them "fake" because they put pigment on their face? No, you only mean people who do that to affect others' perception of them.

Okay so what about someone who buys necessary hygiene products like shampoo and face soap, but they buy the shampoo that says it will make their hair softer and the face wash that will help get rid of their acne. Is that "faking it"? I get the feeling you haven't thought this out, because if you had you would realize your argument makes no sense.

Also, I need to reiterate - it's none of your business what people put on their faces and bodies.
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Posted 6/26/13
(Read the thing in the middle first) Disregarding make-up on how you look, I believe that it is because the majority of people are extroverts who are very social and spend all their time doing 'social' things with their need of happiness bar much higher than an introvert's. The introvert is alot more the type of person who likes to imagine things and be alone, I think extroverts look down on introverts because they are the minority and most people don't even know what I'm talking about. Even on TV the average introvert is the kid who is picked on and bullied.

(Finally realises that this is about make-up as in face, not fantasy land. This is now really awkward...)

Reguarding make-up I think people look down on it because it's not the 'real' you. It also makes alot of people look completely different. There is also the stereotype that prostitutes and whores wear huge amounts of make-up. I guess you can blame television for it creating a bias and what-not. I personally don't care and honestly I can't tell. Maybe it's because I am colorblind and these slight color differences really don't make a difference/matter to me. Honestly when I see someone ragging on someone because of make-up I look at their face and think..."What make-up? I don't see any make-up, am I blind or something."
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21 / M / Cocoon
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Posted 6/26/13
I don't really care all that much, but when kids/pre-teens start smothering themselves in it, or when adults use too much of it, it makes me think of them as whores.
Posted 6/26/13

LavenderMintRose wrote:

I have a legitimate question to those who say that changing your appearance is a lie.

What truth is it concealing and why is it bad to conceal that truth? What importance does the truth being concealed really have?

Putting aside the fact that it's totally none of your business what other people chose to put on their bodies...

Creating a certain appearance for yourself is a form of self-expression. You are taking your physical form - the first thing people see about you - and crafting it to fit how you see your personality within. With the symbols of clothing, makeup, hairstyling, etc., you're making a statement about what sort of person you are to everyone who sees you. Aesthetic tastes do correspond with outlook and values - for instance, you would say that an optimistic outlook was "bright and sunny," while an outlook more inclined towards somber contemplation of mortality and things like that would be "dark". Gothic subculture tends toward the latter, which is why a lot of that aesthetic ends up in dark colors. Such things are linked in the human mind. It's not some oppressive "mainstream" that links them, it's just psychology.
How is "the way your face looks when you wake up" a more important truth to share with the world than your core values and attitude?

Also, where do you draw the line between what's "fake" and what's "natural"? Say there's a person who normally doesn't wear makeup, but today the store they went to only had tinted chapstick so they have that on now. Would you look at them and suddenly declare them "fake" because they put pigment on their face? No, you only mean people who do that to affect others' perception of them.

Okay so what about someone who buys necessary hygiene products like shampoo and face soap, but they buy the shampoo that says it will make their hair softer and the face wash that will help get rid of their acne. Is that "faking it"? I get the feeling you haven't thought this out, because if you had you would realize your argument makes no sense.

Also, I need to reiterate - it's none of your business what people put on their faces and bodies.


Well said I may say so my self .
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20 / M
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Posted 6/26/13
You're quite right, Dropplet and LavenderMintRose. Your body is a blank canvas for you. Many people wear nice clothings to get the same effect as someone getting a tattoo or putting on makeup. To make themselves aesthetically pleasing (not necessarily to the general public) or to express an idea. Do with it as you will.

I've worn makeup as an actor as well, although I just personally dislike the feel of it on me. I'll just stick to my hats and suits to express myself.
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F / Urban South
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Posted 6/26/13
I think that makeup and tattoos are discouraged for children, not for the populace at large. Besides, my tattoos are awesome.
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31 / M
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Posted 6/26/13
Because other than a bit of gloss, eyeliner and mascara its not really needed for the most part.

I'll be a bit blunt, yes many women style their make-up to portray their own feelings on what their image should be
But we'd be lying if we said there weren't any women who used make up to be appealing to men.

On the former, I can understand, but frequently go over the top with it.
On the latter, less is more as far as most guys are concerned. Don't need buckets of make up, and please please stay away from the red lipstick. Most girls can run with pink or light colored glosses, but I've only seen about 10 people in real life who have the complexion to pull of deep deep red lipstick (imo of course) and a third of them juggle for a living

Posted 6/26/13
I didn't really know this was a problem. I think people would like to look the best they can. Make-up on kids is terrible, but adults clearly can make their own decisions.

I dunno. With how commonly used it is I can't really tell when people wear it in moderation. I usually only notice when I see eye shadow and pretty long eye lashes, so I am pretty sure the stuff works as intended if applied as such.

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