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Post Reply The cultural view of seeing a psychiatrist in your country?
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24 / F / the Netherlands
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Posted 7/5/13
I think in the Netherlands the general view of psychiatric disorders in general is that they are either just imagination or that the sufferers are dangerous (it mostly varies by disorder, depression falls in the first category and anti-social personality disorders (psychopaths) fall in the second category), though I do think this differs greatly between groups of people (higher educated people seem less prone to this stereotype). Actually, it almost led to the government removing psychiatric and psychological aid from the national insurance policy.

I think seeking aid for mental problems (whether or not they are classified dissorders) receives a similar attitude, though not-disorders more generally fall into the imagination category rather than the creepy category. I recognise the "we don't think you are crazy, but we can always try if it helps" phrase, it's what is thought to medical students in the Netherlands too, the social stigma is sufficiënt to keep people from recognising they have a psychiatric dissorder (of course this is more extreme when they have mostly physical symptoms).
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35 / New York
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Posted 7/5/13
Regardless of nationality, the rejection, and vilification of psychiatry is generally a religious issue, not a cultural one.
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22 / F / London, UK
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Posted 7/5/13

mipegg wrote:


sillyriri wrote:


mipegg wrote:

In the UK, for girls mental health problems and seeking treatment for them is seen as something that happens but for boys neither the infrastructure nor mentality is where it needs to be yet. The phrase 'just man up' doesnt help someone suffering with mental health problems but its what a huge portion of men who seek some form of help for it (or even just speak to various peers) get


I understand that kind of attitude from peers (women get that too, just delivered in a different way), but do men really get that if they genuinely seek medical help? I'm skeptical, because my brother has been seeing psychiatric care for a couple of years now, and according to him he's never experienced anything other than good professionalism- and this is for a disorder of the sort that isn't really visible to others, and is often misunderstood, very much the sort of thing that would be easy for them to dismiss.


Personal experience yes, it took around 2 years for anyone to say 'maybe there is actually something up we should look into here' rather than being told that its just something you should deal with etc. Most specifically among adolescent boys is it a problem, its becoming more accepted among 25+ slowly but for the teenagers where problems often start (and thus can be cured easily) its a huge issue right now. One that most people dont care about or think doesnt exist, because men dont have problems right


Hmm, that's awful then, I'm so sorry you had to face that kind of attitude. Personally, I cannot bring myself to see a doctor about any problem- physical or mental- without symptoms that are obvious for everyone to see because of a certain family member telling me my whole life that I'm just being "overdramatic". Just trying to pick up the phone and make an appointment can trigger a panic attack. So, yeah, the general ignorance and lack of concern many people seem to have about psychiatric issues drives me up the wall; especially since there are loads of really simple ways the stigma could be lessened, yet no one seems willing to try them.
mipegg 
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22 / M / England
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Posted 7/5/13

sillyriri wrote:


mipegg wrote:


sillyriri wrote:


mipegg wrote:

In the UK, for girls mental health problems and seeking treatment for them is seen as something that happens but for boys neither the infrastructure nor mentality is where it needs to be yet. The phrase 'just man up' doesnt help someone suffering with mental health problems but its what a huge portion of men who seek some form of help for it (or even just speak to various peers) get


I understand that kind of attitude from peers (women get that too, just delivered in a different way), but do men really get that if they genuinely seek medical help? I'm skeptical, because my brother has been seeing psychiatric care for a couple of years now, and according to him he's never experienced anything other than good professionalism- and this is for a disorder of the sort that isn't really visible to others, and is often misunderstood, very much the sort of thing that would be easy for them to dismiss.


Personal experience yes, it took around 2 years for anyone to say 'maybe there is actually something up we should look into here' rather than being told that its just something you should deal with etc. Most specifically among adolescent boys is it a problem, its becoming more accepted among 25+ slowly but for the teenagers where problems often start (and thus can be cured easily) its a huge issue right now. One that most people dont care about or think doesnt exist, because men dont have problems right


Hmm, that's awful then, I'm so sorry you had to face that kind of attitude. Personally, I cannot bring myself to see a doctor about any problem- physical or mental- without symptoms that are obvious for everyone to see because of a certain family member telling me my whole life that I'm just being "overdramatic". Just trying to pick up the phone and make an appointment can trigger a panic attack. So, yeah, the general ignorance and lack of concern many people seem to have about psychiatric issues drives me up the wall; especially since there are loads of really simple ways the stigma could be lessened, yet no one seems willing to try them.


Even worse, the medication prescribed for the most common problems (panic, stress and depression) are SSRIs, they are renown for having supremely high success rate with little to no side-effect and no addictive qualities. Yet taking them seems to be a faux pas for some reason? I realize that the average populous are... dumb to say the least but surely they ahve to apply logic at some point
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Posted 7/5/13

AshRandom wrote:

Regardless of nationality, the rejection, and vilification of psychiatry is generally a religious issue, not a cultural one.


Nope... That is all.
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35 / New York
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Posted 7/5/13

DirEnGay wrote:


AshRandom wrote:

Regardless of nationality, the rejection, and vilification of psychiatry is generally a religious issue, not a cultural one.


Nope... That is all.


Then the burden of proof falls to you when it comes to finding an alternative explanation as to why all of the major anti-psychiatry advocacy groups are backed by churches and various other religious institutions.
Posted 7/5/13
Jesus christ it's you.
weejaa 
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Posted 7/5/13
There is a substantial difference between psychiatrists and therapists. Psychiatrists go through medical school and get medical degrees. Eventually they are given the privilege to prescribe medications. Therapists can have a wide variety of training including Ph.D psychology degrees, social workers, etc. However there are school counselors that fulfill a similar role with different training. In general a psychiatrist has some training in therapy, but often only dabble in training of the evidence based psychotherapies (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, etc.). If you are interested in therapy I'm not sure that psychiatrists would be the best bet. That being said there is huge variability in mental health care with outstanding psychiatrist therapists and horrible psychiatrist therapists. Another wrinkle to this is that insurance companies tend to pay less for therapy and therefore psychiatrists lose money doing therapy instead of prescribing medications.
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Posted 7/5/13
There are too many people taking Psychology major but not a lot of jobs for it. Just like Anthropology.
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Posted 7/5/13
In one of my previous jobs a couple of years back, our office was in a shared building with high security because one of the companies dealt with victims of abusive relationships and surprisingly I saw an equal amount of men walk through those doors as I did women.

I also had an Uncle who used to live next door to me who went crazy a few years ago. He used to frequent bars and pubs a lot and always considered himself to be tough and respected, then one day he got too drunk and got into a fight with pretty much a kid and got his ass handed to him. The shock from this somehow sent him completely insane. He used to starve himself, hallucinate, tried to stab my other uncle, you couldn't have a conversation with him at all and felt unsafe around him, until we eventually found him trying to hang himself and had no choice but to call the police/ambulance and he spent a while in the psychiatric ward in the hospital.

Whereas I can see the cultural and social impacts that having a therapist or psychiatrist can have on other people, mainly through judging and feeling uncomfortable around you, I can also see the huge benefits it can have for certain people, and I think it's mainly down to each individuals stance on the subject rather than how it is viewed nationwide.

Generally in the UK it is considered kind of weird to go to therapy or see a psychiatrist, we're not exactly a Nation known for dealing with or being open about our personal problems, especially not guys to guy friends, but if a situation really warranted therapy or psychiatric help then I'd hope most people would be understanding enough.
Posted 7/5/13
I don't really have anything against psychiatry in general. Mental and emotional problems are real, yes. But mainstream psychiatry is just the thought police hence another form of control over the masses.
Posted 7/5/13
Well UK had these "It's time to talk" adverts

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dTgAGeNRpw
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32 / M / So Cal
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Posted 7/5/13

crazysouthsider wrote:

In the United States seeing a psychiatrist doesn't have a social stigma stuck to it, like it does in other countries like Ireland or the UK. The normal cultural view in American society of someone going to a psychiatrist is they are getting better and people don't have negative views about a person that goes to one. But in Ireland or the UK if you see a psychiatrist people think that your sick person and your crazy.

I was wondering what is norm for what people in your country think about people that see a psychiatrist or a psychologist?


That's not completely true. A lot of Americans view people who go to a shrink as being whiny or spoiled, unless the patient is suffering from a disorder/dysfunction.
Posted 7/5/13 , edited 7/5/13
Nutcase - which is odd, because considering how many people probably see one, it shouldn't be (at least when they feel the majority decides for them. I don't think many feel that they can be honest about it - if they were, others might not see it as a big deal.) I see one. I don't know that I necessarily agree with the idea of relying on someone else's presence to help you feel better, but it's all I could think to do in the moment.
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F / West
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Posted 7/5/13
There shouldn't be a stigma related to seeing a psychiatrist/psychologist, it is essentially seeking treatment for a mental disorder/illness, just like people seeking treatment for diabetes or cancer..it is just a matter of seeing the appropriate specialist, in what you need treated.
Would you judge someone who was actively trying to get better?

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