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The cultural view of seeing a psychiatrist in your country?
Posted 8/22/13 , edited 8/22/13

cpblair83 wrote:

I think it generally depends on the individual. It's fairly natural to judge others based on red flags. It isn't exactly a great impression when someone tells you they are suffering from a mental illness. Especially when you consider that people's minds usually go to the worst possible scenarios.

For instance, sociopaths... Yes, they can be attractive. Most of them are very charming and appear very nice. They can also be very harmless. There are a lot of sociopaths within our day to day society that function and operate perfectly fine. But we always kind of imagine the worst possible scenario. A psychopath! rawr! An intelligent sociopath isn't going to do something that puts his or her "self" in an uncomfortable or regrettable situation. They are capable of leading a life that pretty much resembles a "normal" person.

Psychology isn't exactly a great field atm. In my opinion, it is currently stunted and ass backwards. Even the people with "official" diagnoses might only suffer from mild forms of mental illness, but the "throw a handful of drugs at them and take however many stick!" method is kind of a problem. Plus, you have to realize that most things people experience as mental illness is simply a heightened version of an already present human personality trait. We all get sad. We all act selfish. We all have an ego and we all get mad.

But to answer your question, I think it entirely depends on the person. I don't think it would be accurate to presume a society or even city's stance on a particular topic. Even family members may have differing opinions. The most empathetic people regarding mental illness will be people who have experienced it personally, whether themselves or a family member. The ones who fear it or associate stereotypes/stigma will be the individuals with very little personal experience, because ultimately it isn't something to fear.


nice post. especially the last two paragraphs. psychology is siginificantly flawed and a lot of people probably feel let down by the lack of real treatment and instead they get GP's pushing their shitty ssri's which just interferes with the mind and the illness even more. I agree that people with mental illness or who have experienced it closely will take a different perspective than people who haven't and there first instinct is to be cautious of being around the person.

I really don't like people in real life to know what I have. I wouldn't really know what the view of seeing a psychiatrist here is generally but I do not know many people who openly mention it, a lot don't even get help for it. I don't think people here assume you are crazy, there's a huge rise in the last 10 years of depression and suicides in the UK especially amongst young people so here there's programmes and campaigns to recognize mental illness un-judgementally. Mental illness is subjective to the person and it doesn't help to have people be intolerant and treat you differently because of it, they'd rather have people accept it and treat them normally than have people try to understand it as if they're inside your mind. LUCKILY my psychiatrist trusts what I says and doesn't ridicule it or make me feel irrational.
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24 / F / Iowa
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Posted 8/22/13 , edited 8/22/13
I feel like it depends on what the psychological issue is. If its abuse or trauma then people have no problem with anyone visiting the psychologist but if its depression or for a mental illness I think its far more looked down upon, especially in small communities where everyone knows everything, visiting the psychologist could ruin a person's reputation and cause more damage than good.

After my dad went to Iraq my brother had to go to the psychologist due to behavior issues, the psychologist acted like it was my fault and didn't deal with the true issue, that really angered me. So I'm not a fan of them myself, I prefer medication which goes to the direct source of the problem, which is usually chemical imbalance. I get depressed, there is no "underlying" cause, I sought out help with it and now I'm better with pills. :/
Posted 8/23/13
Yeah, nothing really.
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19 / Chiraq
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Posted 8/23/13
i see a psychologist and psychiatrist, and i live in the us, but have mexican roots. at first, my parents thought mental health stuff was for crazies and kooks, and it was useless on "regular" people. stuff happened blahblah. now they think it doesnt work/ is a waste of money because they think you can get past your illness yourself with your mind and willpower....
i try to tell em, but eh.
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22 / M / Ireland
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Posted 8/23/13
I would say in Ireland you would be considered crazy. Some people wont accept others purely because they are slightly different.
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40 / F
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Posted 8/23/13 , edited 8/23/13
In Washington State (USA), therapists are used by the average and low-income people when major trauma occurs in a person's life (such as when a person is sexually assaulted). Not every health insurance plan covers mental health in their plan, so people who aren't covered are often put on some charity program or refered to a recovery group (such as in the case of alcoholics).

People in this area won't see you as crazy if you go to a shrink (aka a therapist) to sort out your problems.

The average person would be considered crazy by the general public if the person starts exhibiting symptoms of mental disability like schizophrenia. (It's sad, I know. ) On the other hand, the highly educated person, the scientific community and the govt. consider a person with schiophrenia or other mental illness to be "mentally disabled".
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21 / F / Canada
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Posted 8/24/13
No one cares in Canada. In fact, in Canada; Psychiatry appointments are FREE!


I see one every few months, and another every week/ 2 weeks
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Posted 8/24/13
It's also looked down upon in America too. Just because some people think it's to improve life, doesn't mean everyone does.
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52 / M / In
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Posted 8/24/13
The army made me talk to a shrink when I came home from Iraq the first time. At the time I felt it was a waste of time but now I can see the need for it
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47 / Chico
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Posted 10/11/13
i don't think it has too much stigma attached to it anymore in the states ... personally, i think everyone can use an impartial person to rant to now and again ... we all have something to say and need a sounding board that is not emotionally attached to our personal life ... it can be a good thing ... a freeing thing to our spirits.
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23 / F / ireland
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Posted 10/18/13
Historically, Ireland had a pretty shity attitude toward mental health and there is still some stigma to it. Like telling people with depression 'to get over it, think of the starving kids in Africa' or something. We used to just lock people away.

They are trying to change attitudes though with stuff like mental health week.

We have quite a high suicide rate and quite a lot of suicides aren't reported or just called something else. In Limerick people go round the river at night with torches to stop people throwing themselves in. Most of these deaths aren't called suicide so the family can get some insurance payments.
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29 / M / Kentucky
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Posted 10/18/13 , edited 10/18/13
I don't think people need psychiatrists unless suffering from a distinguishable disorder. Most people just want someone to shutup, listen to their problems, and comment or hear their honest thoughts and opinions about them without any restraints from social order or norms.

By distinguishable disorder, I mean schizo, bipolar, multiple personality disorder, and possibly social disorders.

Edit: I don't THINK people in my country view it as irregular at all really. Course asking just 1 person for an overall view of the country Is kinda pointless anyway.
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31 / M
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Posted 10/18/13
I dont think a psychiatrists has the same function in every country.
psychiatrist is 7 year university study 3-5 year of medical and then 2-4 years of specialization in mental disorders and other problems

I Denmark where i live a psychiatrist is the only one who can diagnose i mental disorder and is someone you have to get reffered to by your physician/doctor so in Denmark you'd generaly be mentally voulnerable to even go to a psychiatrist.
A psychotherapist, or a psychologist( cannot diagnose with a joined oppinion from person with a medical degree)

I know this cause i've been all the way through the system XDD
Posted 10/18/13 , edited 10/18/13

Oh for fuck sake. Quote your shit properly. All of you.

As for the OP. Where I'm from it's not stigmatized. Of course, the majority of women don't dig someone who has problems with their mental health, no matter what it is, because they're shallow, just the way the majority of men are shallow in their own way, but that's not stigma. The few who attempts to stigmatize psychological illnesses in this country are mostly high-functioning retards; people who lack self-consciousness, perspective, and insight; momma's boys who got to suck on their mommy's titties too long, but nobody gives a crap about them. In fact, most people are quick to shut them up and mock their lack of intelligence.
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22 / M
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Posted 10/18/13
Eh, it's not really stigmatized where I live. Some people really improve from the help they get from talking to a psychiatrist. I've kind of wanted to become a psychiatrist for a while myself, so I look up to them. They have to be unbiased and totally objective, and they get to meet some very interesting people.

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