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Post Reply ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) & Asperger's
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23 / M / UK
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Posted 8/6/13
I'm close to a lot of people on the spectrum. There are many people who think those with autism should be feared or avoided when in fact it's quite the contrary. Patience and empathy will be rewarded with some of the most fantastic conversations you'll ever have. There's a lot of insight to be heard from an autistic mind, since there's much less of the crap in a "normal" mind to clog it up.
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22 / F / in the TARDIS wit...
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Posted 8/6/13
I had patients with autism during my undergrad course internship. I rather liked them actually. Sadly society is not very enlightened about autism so most people in the areas I've been to shun autistic individuals indirectly.

I admit I still know little but it's rather fun to learn more about autism and autistic individuals.
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Posted 8/6/13
I was diagnosed with Aspergers very late, then later with HFA. I was also diagnosed with ADHD by a teacher before another teacher diagnosed me with Aspergers. Back in high school, though thinking back on it I had always tried to avoid people I didn't know. I never talked in class except one time in an English class and that was the only time in 4 years I opened my mouth for more than 2 people.

That was over 10 years ago. For those years any time I had a random social encounter and was forced to hold casual conversation I often ask myself, in my head, 'Is that something normal people say or do?' on average about 30 seconds into conversation. Then I feel flush and anxious and start reviewing my memory about places to retreat too and reasons I can use to get away.

Some of my other quirks are that I cannot bring myself to hang up the phone first so telemarketers have a field day. And once I open the front door salesmen can give my an earfull before they realize I'm just verbally dancing around their sale and not going to buy anything. Which is hard because they can be quite pushy sometimes.

Like an above commenter (I don't post at all so I didn't care to try and fail a quote) I often stumble through conversation based solely on what I've observed to date. Even then the majority of my responses are simple nods and uh-huh. I have found that I have a significantly easier time communicating with others if they can't see my face or hear my voice. So silver linings I guess.
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31 / M / Colorado Springs,...
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Posted 8/6/13


If you're interested in learning about HFA, there is a plethora of online information and symptoms but be warned, HFA can be mistaken for many other things. And it's always best to avoid self-diagnosis. It is different for a lot of people.


They were ready to diagnosis me as a sociopath because they thought I had anti-social personality disorder and narcissistic personality disorder. You're absolute right, a lot of people don't have a very good understanding of it and it's rather sad. I have very specific personality traits that shatter any ASPD or NPD diagnosis, but they would have easily written that down in my folder; for all to base their perception and future medical bias from.
Sogno- 
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Posted 8/6/13
I'm not, but I had a friend in college who was autistic, and I have taught a child who was as well. The child was hard to deal with when I was trying to teach, but he was really smart and continuously surprised me by his academic skills.
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F / cosplay central
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Posted 8/6/13

Sogno- wrote:

I'm not, but I had a friend in college who was autistic, and I have taught a child who was as well. The child was hard to deal with when I was trying to teach, but he was really smart and continuously surprised me by his academic skills.


Some kids with it tend to be a bit chaotic, while others are very shy and withdrawn. My son once hid under his desk for two hours. and i know he disrupted the classroom often, transitions are hard for a lot of ASD kids. and they act out when they have to switch from one subject to another when they haven't finished with the original work or task.

This is not true of all kids, a person earlier in the thread compared people with ASD to snowflakes, and that is a pretty apt description.

I'm not sure if this was the case for the child in your class, but if you teach an autistic kid again, and switching tasks is difficult for them, try letting them know at the beginning of a subject, and make sure they look you in the eye (or that they have a helper have the helper do this) when telling them, 'we will be doing this for X amount of time" then 10 or 15 minutes before its over, 'ok we now have x amount of time before we switch to X subject' and again at 10 or 5 minutes. It helps with my son, so he's ready for whatever is next and moving on doesn't cause issues. After they get older, its easier and this isn't needed (as much, though some warning is always nice, i wouldn't suggest surprise visits to your friend with aspergers house. they've probably past the point of hiding under desks but you'll have more fun if the person knows ahead of time and has time to mentally prepare for their day to change. again i point out that not ALL aspies or people with ASD are like this but transitions are a big deal in a lot of cases)

having said all that, another person on the forum wrote something along the lines of, some of the best conversations come from people with ASD It's very true, and a lot of aspies tend to be either very artistic, like Jim Henson, or very scientific, like Einstein, could you imagine a conversation with either of those gentlemen?
Posted 8/6/13
My brother who is now 20 has autism~ he also has a disability. And let me say he is a bright talented, and humble dude. His case is a very rare one and doctors wanted to do a documentary because he wasn't suppose to live pass 3 years old. Teaching him is hard when he was little but now we learned to be very patient and explain everything from A to C. His speech has improved alot from a couple years ago. He still stutters and sometimes spaces out and can't focus on convos we have with him. But lately having more discussions with him has worked in him thinking more about what he has to say and he talks alot more with very few stuttering.
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19 / M / Norway, Tønsberg
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Posted 8/6/13
I have been diagnosed with aspergers
Yet I am not particularly interested in anything
after we moved (before I was diagnosed) I don't really talk much to anyone anymore be it online or offline
Well I do answer questions in class but that's about it. Well I am very introverted after all.
I had pretty good grades except for in languages, but not anymore since I have no motivation and don't lift a finger the moment i leave school but somehow I am getting through it with average grades by just paying attention and working at school.
I might be depressed too but I don't really know. Well whatever.
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16 / M / London, Essex
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Posted 8/6/13
I dont think attention disorders are real. Just made up by doctors to give different kids an excuse for their actions. Just because i was naughty in my 1st skl i supposedly had Asperger's then in my 2nd skl i supposedly had ADHD. What a load of crap!
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23 / F / NY
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Posted 8/6/13 , edited 8/6/13


I'm not a psychologist and thus this is absolutely NOT a formal diagnosis, but yeah from your description you sound depressed. I know where you're coming from as I'm partially depressed myself even now (and believe me, I've been in a slump for the past 5 years now; my entire time in undergrad (I got a BA in Math from that, of all things...) and with my senior year of hs, along with my first year after college). So, just keep fighting and don't give up, albeit I feel like a hypocrite saying that X_x.



I meant a combination of the fact I had horrible coordination and the fact I was extremely fidgety as a kid (just realized you may have interpreted that wrong). In any event I'm not surprised he's into video games, I was too and games probably saved my fine motor coordination, if anything making it above average due to the passive coordination training gaming provides. I currently have no problems doing stuff like playing games that require super-fine coordination like Danmaku shooters (Dondonpachi/touhou), handling chopsticks, tying shoelaces (I was unable to do that until I was like 12, xD), or writing clearly (even though I still much prefer keyboards, which btw, I can type on at 70-80 wpm).

So video games DO have redeeming qualities, see?!
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19 / F / Michigan
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Posted 8/6/13
I personally don't have either (I have mild-severe OCD) but a close friend of mine has Asperger's. When I first met him in my sophomore year, he seemed like your average intelligent (and somewhat anti-social) high schooler. He got almost a perfect ACT and always knew some of the randomest (but interesting) facts. His level of intelligence always amazed me everyday. I didn't know about his Asperger's for a few months but to me it didn't change the way I viewed him at all.
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23 / M / England
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Posted 8/6/13 , edited 8/6/13
I have high function autism, since birth. Growing up was really hard for me, many people wouldn't understand my behaviour and
the way I felt about certain things.

I am fairly smart since when I was at college my class mates would ask me if I knew how to spell this or help them with a problem their having
with certain answers.

I do shut myself away from people sometimes since I find it hard to deal with a lot of things in my life, don't have that many friends either
though I do try to make friends, but trying to talk to people I don't know can be a challege.

As I gotten older I've learn to cope and I realised that I'm not the only person going though this, there are other people like me that have autism and some stuggle to cope, luckly I have a good family that supported me though the hardest times.

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Posted 8/6/13 , edited 8/6/13
Hi, i have a mild form of Aspergers and I can honestly I have a good life with lodes of fiends and qualifications. Yes I did try harder then most people to fit in as I found it very hard to socialize at first but one you get used to the people with me they did accepted that im different and i did have a bond with them.

I did have problems growing up with it as I did get bullied when I was young because I was different mainly from 10 - 16 years old and to be honest I’m still not the best reader, writer or speller but I just didn’t give up on it. I i was treated like an freak by people and i did feel like did not belong there. i felt like i was from another planit somethings. people didnt understaned me for a while i come out of my shell more when i was in high school and college though and i did make fiends better then in the past.

I was diagnosed at age 12 with this along with dyslexia and dysphasia.

Never got me down though!

Now I’m 18 years old and a trainee vet and a part time karate instructor (first DAN black belt) .

i also have an amazing memory of ramdom facts what has pissed poeple off in the past! Ones i start someting i dont stop even if the others dont care about what im saying i just keep on going lol. I am a science and geography geek with a very bad temper! got 4 A* in biology and chemistry all together along with A's in maths and geog all in A levels. ones iv seen it or studied it it wont leave my head lol. but still had truble reading, spelling and writing. I hade to use a laptop in all my exams in school and college.

For people who do have autism don’t think the world is against you it is hard to live with it something’s I know that more them most people and there is people who will judge you on the spot the second they know your different but there just ass holes. Trust me it gets better the older you get the more people will understand your difficulty’s and disabilities.

Ps sorry for grammar and spelling if anything is wrong lol!
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M / Texas
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Posted 8/6/13
Asperger's here. I know the DSM changes quite a bit. I am sure somewhere down the line they will bring back Asperger's. I just remember dealing with it when I was a kid. I used to read book after book on certain subjects and I was always ridiculed for it. I always thought it was wrong of people to tell me such things so I ignored them. Now people are rewarded for having such focus. How times change.

I found out a long time ago that I wasn't like most other people. I've come to terms with it. I've always been an introvert so being alone was never a big deal for me. I would much rather be somewhere reading a good book than be around people who shun me just because I'm not a cookie cutter version of a human being.

I'm actually reading a great book called Quiet by Susan Cain. In it, she talks about introverts and explains why the world needs us. It's a terrific read for anyone who's ever felt they didn't quite fit into society's mold.
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F / cosplay central
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Posted 8/6/13
ok lets see if i figured out how to use the 'spoiler' hide the extra text stuffs lol


You're probably right, I miss read something. but yes games have many redeeming qualites Orion saved up money to buy WoW (which i monitor closely) It's taught him a lot about things like sharing and teamwork too.



could you imagine a world of only extroverts?
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