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Post Reply ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) & Asperger's
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M / Texas
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Posted 8/6/13

AzuresShade wrote:

ok lets see if i figured out how to use the 'spoiler' hide the extra text stuffs lol


You're probably right, I miss read something. but yes games have many redeeming qualites Orion saved up money to buy WoW (which i monitor closely) It's taught him a lot about things like sharing and teamwork too.



could you imagine a world of only extroverts?


In the book, it talks about how many of us are pushed to be extroverts and even many businesses practically require you to be one for things like group and team work. I remember being told in school that if I didn't participate in a group, I would get a lower grade. I just think it's funny that some people think everyone has the potential to be an extrovert. Studies have shown that some of us are hardwired to be an introvert and there is no amount of exposure therapy or medication that will change that. It's a wonderful book. You should check it out if this subject interests you.
tedn 
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53 / M / Portland, Oregon
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Posted 8/6/13
It's a spectrum disorder. Some grow out of it,some get worse and just curl up into a ball in the corner, don't bother them! My kids dont talk, have fits,self abuse, but we try to be happy every day.
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Posted 8/6/13



you're right about all of that. I once worked at TGI Fridays (loong ago back with they still required 'flare') I was hired as a hostess, but was eventually talked into becoming a server. Being a hostess wasn't bad, I was able to stay quiet and interaction with the patrons was basically just giving them somewhere to sit. but the servers were expected to be loud and boisterous, to yell out announcements and bounce around singing happy birthday and like.

one day while i was dressed in my nice hostess clothing (business wear) a server begged me to present a birthday and i capitulated. afterwards i was a total wreck, shaking so hard and I almost past out from stress and nerves.

It was after that, that I realized i donned my serving uniform like 'armor' basically it was a costume and i 'played the part' i don't really know how to explain it better than that, and when i was forced to take on that role without my armor it didn't work out so well.

so yeah, pretending to be extroverted *nods* I can relate. I'll probably pick that book up, thanks for sharing!
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Posted 8/6/13

What an interesting thread! Thanks for starting this. I was diagnosed with ADHD (also a sensory integration disorder) as an adult, and was heavily medicated for a while. If I were in grade school now, I might be mistakenly diagnosed with Asperger's. I'm a high Machiavellian with stunted empathy, but excellent analytical skills. Now I am a research scientist working on a PhD in neuropharmacology, with an interest in the cognitive deficits correlated with major depressive disorder.

You're very lucky that your parents got you OT and other interventions during early childhood, while your neurons were still myelinating. The amount of neural plasticity is amazing at that age, and slows down considerably after the age of four, although most pediatricians won't bother to evaluate kids before they are five. Also, lying about your diagnosis was totally done for your benefit. Fifteen, twenty years ago the public understanding of autism wasn't particularly enlightened.

This sounds like Asperger's to me. I did early childhood care for a few years, and the Asperger's kids were this kind of different. I remember caring for a child that was obviously this kind of different, and trying to convince his parents that he would benefit from early interventions without overstepping my bounds. He had a thing for wheels, and was fascinated by anything that turned around an axis. When he was overwhelmed by his environment and started freaking out, I would pull him into a calm place in the room, put a hot wheels car into his hand upside down and spin the wheels for him. As he grew he learned to keep one in his left hand at all times for self-regulation.

They are real, and you are probably a weird kid. But don't worry about it, because lots of us are weird, and you don't have to take medicine to make you "normal". Medicine is one of many compensatory tools you have at your disposal. It's the most effective tool, but it's really only useful when you need to function in a certain way to accomplish something (like making it through a school day without detention/suspension). I personally think that a lot of kids are forced onto a pharmacological regime because their parents find them annoying, and that vigorous exercise and earplugs are more than sufficient for weekends and school breaks.

Anhedonia is a symptom of depression, but unless it is accompanied by long-term (>2 weeks) feelings of despair and hopelessness then you do not meet diagnostic criteria for clinical depression. You are at an age in which nihilism is common, so don't rush into any prescriptions. Try some lifestyle changes first. For example, exercise if you're sedentary, eat meat if you're a vegetarian, try some moderate drinking if you're a heavy drinker (or a non-drinker), kick your sex life up a bit, etc.

Ass burgers...
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23 / M / UK
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Posted 8/6/13


I'm so glad I came back to this thread. Best reply I've seen on a forum in ages.
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