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Post Reply What is FUNimation?
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Posted 9/8/13
I don't understand, what is FUNimation? If they license something does that mean Crunchyroll cannot? Can someone explain what funimation is and why they prevent crunchyroll from streaming certain shows like highschool dxd?
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Posted 9/8/13 , edited 9/9/13
Funimation is a licensing company , they make japanese anime into english and basically sell it to english buyers over here in the west.

Funimation basically also own the copyrights to highschool dxd, also if crunchyroll had it you wouldn't have it uncensored like funimation does. Crunchyroll is basically just a streaming site to watch anime.

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Posted 9/8/13 , edited 9/8/13
Crunchyroll censors?! :O
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Posted 9/8/13

pandrasb wrote:

Crunchyroll censors?! :O


CR does not censor anything themselves. However, many of the more fanservice or violence heavy shows will be censored for the television broadcast in Japan (to encourage viewers to buy the BD/DVDs when they are released uncensored). When Funimation licenses shows, they are often able to secure those uncensored home video masters, while CR only ever receives the broadcast masters.
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Posted 9/8/13

eyeofpain wrote:


pandrasb wrote:

Crunchyroll censors?! :O


CR does not censor anything themselves. However, many of the more fanservice or violence heavy shows will be censored for the television broadcast in Japan (to encourage viewers to buy the BD/DVDs when they are released uncensored). When Funimation licenses shows, they are often able to secure those uncensored home video masters, while CR only ever receives the broadcast masters.


Thanks for the info.
Still curious how illegal sites get them uncensored.
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Posted 9/8/13 , edited 9/8/13

pandrasb wrote:

Still curious how illegal sites get them uncensored.


Some of those shows are broadcast on pay cable stations, which have to adhere less strict broadcast standards, and typically don't have a licensing relationship with Crunchyroll, which mainly deals with over-the-air channels (along with other intellectual property holders).

And since the fansubbers don't have to abide by any legal contracts (they're already breaking the law, after all), they pull videos from where ever they feel like.

Don't take the above information as the absolute Truth; I'm sure I got some facts wrong, and someone will be along to clarify/correct.
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Posted 9/8/13

eyeofpain wrote:


pandrasb wrote:

Still curious how illegal sites get them uncensored.


Some of those shows are broadcast on pay cable stations, which have to adhere less strict broadcast standards, and typically don't have a licensing relationship with Crunchyroll, which mainly deals with over-the-air channels (along with other intellectual property holders).

And since the fansubbers don't have to abide by any legal contracts (they're already breaking the law, after all), they pull videos from where ever they feel like.

Don't take the above information as the absolute Truth; I'm sure I got some facts wrong, and someone will be along to clarify/correct.


Well, I get a good idea of how it works, thanks for satisfying my curiosity
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Posted 9/9/13
While the thread is still hot I've got a question to add to it.

How does FUNimation and Crunchyroll, even other legal streaming and distribution companies, get the rights to the anime?

Is it an agreement? Is it a license? Does Crunchyroll have the right to distribute but not the means? Funimation probably has the right to steam as I believe they do it, however poorly.

What makes FUNimation and Crunchyroll different from each other license wise, as far as we're able to know.

I'm sure they have plenty of reasons, but what are some of the more visible and obvious ones? We can't exactly look at the contracts of course, but I'm curious.
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Posted 9/9/13 , edited 9/9/13
Pretty much the same thing as CR, I will never get thier slogan though.

'you should be watching'

what is that suppose to mean? Somehow the tv figured out I chat on this website while watching Eureka Seven AO (Actually doing it right now as I type this lol)
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Posted 9/9/13

Felstalker wrote:

While the thread is still hot I've got a question to add to it.

How does FUNimation and Crunchyroll, even other legal streaming and distribution companies, get the rights to the anime?

Is it an agreement? Is it a license? Does Crunchyroll have the right to distribute but not the means? Funimation probably has the right to steam as I believe they do it, however poorly.

What makes FUNimation and Crunchyroll different from each other license wise, as far as we're able to know.

I'm sure they have plenty of reasons, but what are some of the more visible and obvious ones? We can't exactly look at the contracts of course, but I'm curious.


Funimation's main revenue stream comes from selling physical discs, while Crunchyroll is primarily focused on digital distribution (I believe they've only been involved in one DVD release, and that was a Makoto Shinkai rescue).

As for getting the rights/permission for shows, I believe this starts as an agreement, and solidified in a legal contract before the licensor (like Funi or CR) is able to receive materials and do anything with the episodes. For a more detailed explanation, I'd suggest reading The Anime Economy articles written by Justin Sevakis and posted on ANN, [url=http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/feature/2012-03-09]the 3rd Part in particular, which deals specifically with digital distribution.


GeassForce wrote:

Pretty much the same thing as CR, I will never get thier slogan though.

'you should be watching'

what is that suppose to mean? Somehow the tv figured out I chat on this website while watching Eureka Seven AO (Actually doing it right now as I type this lol)


Yeah, it's not the best slogan. After all, if I'm hearing it, I'm already watching.
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Posted 9/9/13

GeassForce wrote:

Pretty much the same thing as CR, I will never get thier slogan though.

'you should be watching'

what is that suppose to mean? Somehow the tv figured out I chat on this website while watching Eureka Seven AO (Actually doing it right now as I type this lol)


The "you should be watching" is meant to be taken as "You should be watching FUNimation products." Which is why it makes the best sense if it's said this way, "FUNimation: You should be watching." with FUNimation as part of the phrasing. Think Japanese sentence structure over English with the verb placed at the end. Putting it at the beginning of videos and such is redundant since you are doing what the slogan told you to do, however the marketing for the company itself (not individual products) is what the slogan is for.
Dragon
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Posted 9/11/13


You can think of Funimation and CR as competitors at times. Both want exclusive streaming deals because those are the ones that draw more users (and hopefully money) to each company. I'm not privy to the details behind these, but based on other experience with a similar industry, it works kind of like this:

Some contracts are up for open bidding. Effectively, the companies say how much cash they'll pony up for the rights to stream the item, and after that contract expires, it may be renewed, may go back up for auction, or may be pulled from streaming completely. Generally these go to the highest bidder.

Some contracts are bulk deals. You are trying to get, say, all of Studio IG's output for the winter season. These might get you a slightly lower rate per show, since some are high demand titles while others are not, but it does mean you pay more for the lower-demand titles that won't bring in as much cash for the streaming site.

Some are "first right of refusal" type - you have a good deal going with a studio, and so you get it written in to a previous contract that they have to come to you first the next time a show comes up for distribution, and you get to say yes or no (at the quoted price) before it can go up for a normal bidding war.

And some are mixes, where you might get a lower rate on a renewal of a license to stream if you also purchase the streaming rights for a new season, or you might pay extra to have exclusive rights to stream for a month, but then other companies can also start streaming and the price goes down per company. Then there's stuff like if it'll also be on Hulu, or if it's from a premium channel in Japan (perhaps because those sometimes show uncensored stuff), that will be more expensive, and more.

Basically, it mostly boils down to money, with a healthy dose of wheeling and dealing for other stuff on the side in order to get the stuff each streaming site wants to show.



That's mostly assumptions that contracts in my own industry work the same way as these, and some guessing based on other comments around here and other places.
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Posted 9/11/13 , edited 9/11/13
What above is about right. In addition, those who license the titles can sub-license those titles to others if the agreement doesn't exclude that. For example, Funimation might license something for North American and Europe, and sub-license the European distribution to another company. If the licensing agreement doesn't include exclusive rights, it could be licensed to another company in the same market as well. There is normally a higher cost associated with these exclusive agreements, but it is normally done to edge out competition.

In a way, exclusive agreements can be good, whereas you don't receive an inferior product, but can be bad if a company goes under and its license ends up in limbo. In some cases, a company will miss a title that wasn't a big hit in Japan, but does much better in another market.

Similarly, Electronic Arts has exclusive rights to make games featuring NFL products. This an example of where lack of competition hurts innovation, as a company doesn't have to improve on its product as there isn't a company to compete against you.

Right now, Funimation is a licensing company, though they have started to dabble outside of that, with streaming and their cooperation with EA on a Mass Effect movie. Their streaming portion is quite far behind Crunchyroll at this time, mostly due to the lackluster performance of their website.
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Posted 9/11/13

ShadowFallsAlpha wrote:

Their streaming portion is quite far behind Crunchyroll at this time, mostly due to the lackluster performance of their website.


Funi is in the middle of rolling out their new site backend, so hopefully that improves in the next couple weeks (I kinda miss their forums, too).
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Posted 9/11/13 , edited 9/11/13
That remains to be seen, their forums have been offline for over two months now, the site "upgrade" has been in process for at least a year... With little to no results and no estimated time to completion. The lack of communication during the issues has been even worse. To me, it seems as if there is only one person doing it during their lunch breaks...

I can only hope they come back with a better site that uses HTML5, or at least Silverlight for the videos, which works pretty well. Netlfix uses it. The Flash heavy site was part of the issue, among other things.
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