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Post Reply EU and Middle East Territories for Kill la Kill
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Posted 9/25/13 , edited 9/25/13

mendo_shutaro wrote: You really rally to CR's defence don't you. It's impressive, I guess.

I study the anime media market. I rally to the opposition of whinging pommies spreading misinformation and confusion about that market.


Content is content, and I see the "not available in your region" error as much as I see videos which actually work. I assume many must be catalogue titles based on what you have said, but to be frank, I don't care and shouldn't have to care. It's just content, and it should just work. Or the UK subs should be reduced.

Why should other people subsidize the UK? That is what you are asking for when you ask for the UK price to be reduces.

After all, all of the revenue from UK subscribers goes to the series that they watch. If royalties from UK members are not enough to win the rights, what you are demanding is that Crunchyroll uses revenues from North America, South America, the rest of Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia to subsidize UK rights.

Why? What makes the UK so special that you should be subsidized by everyone else ~ including members who get substantially less access than you get?


Obviously this debate is going nowhere. You think CR are doing an amazing, barnstorming job in the UK.

Reading is fundamental. I never said any such thing, I just point out that some of the arguments that you made are unrealistic nonsense that fit a fantasy world, not the real world.


Sadly UK CR subscribers, disagree, or at least the ones on the forums do.

That is an important qualifier. Just because the small minority that makes a lot of noise on forums convince each other that they have an excuse to whinge does not mean that every UK member fits the ozzie stereotype of the whinging pommie.

Indeed, I know that not all UK CR subscribers are off in fantasy land, because I see a number on the AnimeNewsNetwork forums and the mania.com anime streaming forum who clearly understand that Crunchyroll is working to get all the UK rights that they can get, and when Crunchyroll doesn't get UK rights, its either the Japanese licensor or the contract signed by a North American or UK home video distributor that is getting in the way.


We think they're lazy, complacent, and pig headed.

Yes, its easy for a group of people talking to each other and agreeing with each other to pretend that Crunchyroll could magically get more rights if they just worked harder, and ignore that what you are asking for is for everyone else to subsidize Crunchyroll getting UK rights. That lets you ignore the fact that by pooling rights with North America, you get access to series at a much lower cost per episode than you ever could get on your own.


As for AnimeOnDemand, I'm not even sure they still exist. Their site is still up, but they've been quiet for many months now.

That's the point I was making, silly. They tried an independent UK streaming site. They even outbid Crunchyroll for UK rights. But their subscription prices were too high. Then they promised something new and exciting would be coming while streaming a number of seasons for free with no actual revenue streaming source.


Not to worry, I believe there are still plenty of fansub groups around.

Yes, its a lot easier to get things done as a leech bloodsucker, relying on the work of others. No contract costs when the original creators aren't going to see a pence of the revenues in any event.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 9/25/13

mendo_shutaro wrote:

You really rally to CR's defence don't you. It's impressive, I guess.

Content is content, and I see the "not available in your region" error as much as I see videos which actually work. I assume many must be catalogue titles based on what you have said, but to be frank, I don't care and shouldn't have to care. It's just content, and it should just work. Or the UK subs should be reduced.

Obviously this debate is going nowhere. You think CR are doing an amazing, barnstorming job in the UK. Sadly UK CR subscribers, disagree, or at least the ones on the forums do. We think they're lazy, complacent, and pig headed.

It helps balance out someone that always post as if CR can do no right, and is solely responsible for some series not being available to the UK. Apparently it is all CR's fault they can't brow beat the licensors in Japan into doing their bidding, or you think they should just shovel piles of money at them until they say "Yes", even though that would be a money-losing proposition.

Reducing the subscription cost would simply further reduce the amount of anime CR could afford to license for the UK. It would also set a precedent that CR's subscription rate should vary according to the number of titles available (which typically would mean it should increase every year).

You stated before that CR should get out of the European market and let someone else take up the cause. Let's assume such a company did, but had no more titles than CR or possibly even less, but charged the same subscription rate. Would you then berate them and clamor for them to lower their rates, because CR (a completely separate company in this scenario) provides more titles to people in the U.S.?


BTW, when were you elected to speak for all subscribers in the UK?
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Posted 9/25/13 , edited 9/25/13
I don't think Crunchyroll can be blamed for not streaming Kill la Kill to the UK and Daisuki's latest announcement makes it more likely that someone else has picked up the exclusive rights for it. This is just speculation but I think Kaze/Viz Europe have got the rights for France and the UK. Unfortunately this would mean that it would be on Anime on Demand which is possibly the worst anime streaming site I've ever used.
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Posted 9/25/13 , edited 9/25/13

MrJoMiMo92 wrote: I don't think Crunchyroll can be blamed for not streaming Kill la Kill to the UK and Daisuki's latest announcement makes it more likely that someone else has picked up the exclusive rights for it. This is just speculation but I think Kaze/Viz Europe have got the rights for France and the UK. Unfortunately this would mean that it would be on Anime on Demand which is possibly the worst anime streaming site I've ever used.


If Viz Europe are not going to do anything with Anime-on-Demand, then picking up the exclusive rights seems like being a dog in the manger. Whether they are going to restart the Anime-on-Demand on life support, or are just going to leave UK without a simulcast, waiting for the physical release, either way is clearly not a permanent solution.

Since the French licensee that uses the Crunchyroll engine for Genzai.fr, Kana Home Video, has joined forces with Kaze, which had the streaming site KZPlay.kaze.fr, to create AnimeDigitalNetwork.fr, its seems like the simplest thing for Viz Europe to do in the UK would be to just use the Crunchyroll-UK site, with a deal for special marketing links to Kaze releases in the UK.

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Posted 9/26/13

agila61 wrote:


mendo_shutaro wrote: You really rally to CR's defence don't you. It's impressive, I guess.

I study the anime media market. I rally to the opposition of whinging pommies spreading misinformation and confusion about that market.


Content is content, and I see the "not available in your region" error as much as I see videos which actually work. I assume many must be catalogue titles based on what you have said, but to be frank, I don't care and shouldn't have to care. It's just content, and it should just work. Or the UK subs should be reduced.

Why should other people subsidize the UK? That is what you are asking for when you ask for the UK price to be reduces.

After all, all of the revenue from UK subscribers goes to the series that they watch. If royalties from UK members are not enough to win the rights, what you are demanding is that Crunchyroll uses revenues from North America, South America, the rest of Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia to subsidize UK rights.

Why? What makes the UK so special that you should be subsidized by everyone else ~ including members who get substantially less access than you get?


Obviously this debate is going nowhere. You think CR are doing an amazing, barnstorming job in the UK.

Reading is fundamental. I never said any such thing, I just point out that some of the arguments that you made are unrealistic nonsense that fit a fantasy world, not the real world.


Sadly UK CR subscribers, disagree, or at least the ones on the forums do.

That is an important qualifier. Just because the small minority that makes a lot of noise on forums convince each other that they have an excuse to whinge does not mean that every UK member fits the ozzie stereotype of the whinging pommie.

Indeed, I know that not all UK CR subscribers are off in fantasy land, because I see a number on the AnimeNewsNetwork forums and the mania.com anime streaming forum who clearly understand that Crunchyroll is working to get all the UK rights that they can get, and when Crunchyroll doesn't get UK rights, its either the Japanese licensor or the contract signed by a North American or UK home video distributor that is getting in the way.


We think they're lazy, complacent, and pig headed.

Yes, its easy for a group of people talking to each other and agreeing with each other to pretend that Crunchyroll could magically get more rights if they just worked harder, and ignore that what you are asking for is for everyone else to subsidize Crunchyroll getting UK rights. That lets you ignore the fact that by pooling rights with North America, you get access to series at a much lower cost per episode than you ever could get on your own.


As for AnimeOnDemand, I'm not even sure they still exist. Their site is still up, but they've been quiet for many months now.

That's the point I was making, silly. They tried an independent UK streaming site. They even outbid Crunchyroll for UK rights. But their subscription prices were too high. Then they promised something new and exciting would be coming while streaming a number of seasons for free with no actual revenue streaming source.


Not to worry, I believe there are still plenty of fansub groups around.

Yes, its a lot easier to get things done as a leech bloodsucker, relying on the work of others. No contract costs when the original creators aren't going to see a pence of the revenues in any event.


You can look at this two ways. One, that the percentage of revenue CR gets from any given territory should be directly proportional to how much content that territory gets. So, if the UK contributes 10%, it should get 10% of the content.

Or you could look at it like this - everyone pays the same, and so should get the same product.

I obviously take the latter view, you, I assume, take the former. In my view, all non US territories are subsidising the US - we pay the same, but get far, far less. Of course, that's just my view, I have no idea of the actual numbers, nor do you.

You also assert that only a small amount of non US subscribers are unhappy about being denied content. If that were true, that would be surprising for reasons too obvious to waste time talking about.

As for fansubbers being bloodsuckers, well you could take that view I suppose. Or you could say they provide a product which is not available through any other channel. When something is available easily and at a fair price through legal channels, people are generally happy to use them. When they aren't, piracy thrives. For reasons we will presumably never know, CR haven't licensed the biggest title of the season for their paying EU subscribers. So we either a) download a fansub, b) wait for a possible DVD release sometime between now and forever, or c) don't see this particular title, ever. Guess which route most people will take?

And one final point, please don't resort to insults ever again. They add nothing, and are frankly childish.
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Posted 9/26/13

mendo_shutaro wrote: You can look at this two ways. One, that the percentage of revenue CR gets from any given territory should be directly proportional to how much content that territory gets. So, if the UK contributes 10%, it should get 10% of the content.

Or you could look at it like this - everyone pays the same, and so should get the same product.

I obviously take the latter view, you, I assume, take the former.

You are forgetting the third ~ the fair price is what it costs to serve you.

I already said that was the one I was using, so I don't really see why you have to assume I was using something else.


In my view, all non US territories are subsidising the US - we pay the same, but get far, far less. Of course, that's just my view, I have no idea of the actual numbers, nor do you.


First, what you pay in subscriber fees goes to the anime you watch. So all UK royalties either go to UK content, or go to content for UK customers who have found a way to trick the geolocation software.

Second, in a media rights system, getting rights to more content requires paying more.

All of your payments go into royalties for the shows that you watch, so unless you are tricking the geolocation software, it all goes to the series licensed for the UK. None of your money goes to the anime you are locked out of.

And at present, what you are currently paying, pooled together among all UK members, is enough to convince the licensors for 80%+ of simulcasts to include the UK.

Saying that you want to pay less than US subscribers means that you have to accept getting fewer series. Because the fewer royalties come from the UK, the fewer companies will bother offering UK rights to Crunchyroll. Remember that many of the UK series are sub-licenses, where a North American home video distributor requested broader streaming rights in order to get larger royalty payments from Crunchyroll by tapping a larger audience.

If Sentai decided that it was no longer worth while to get UK streaming rights, you would lose between five and ten series in one blow.


You also assert that only a small amount of non US subscribers are unhappy about being denied content. If that were true, that would be surprising for reasons too obvious to waste time talking about.

The reason you don't quote me saying that is because I didn't say that, so you can't.

I was referring to the people that adopt the position that you stated, which I quoted, because you said it (notice how you couldn't quote me saying what you claimed I said, because I said no such thing). That is the position that Crunchyroll could easily get 100% of new simulcasts and easily get 100% of catalog titles if only it would try harder. In your words,

It's pathetic, and is exactly the kind of lazy, contemptuous behavior which turns off customers and convinces them to cancel their subscriptions.


We know that there are a number of active UK commentators who hold that view. However, we also know that active commentators are only a very small fraction of total members, and we know that the Crunchyroll forums are not the only place where people talk about anime.

If you think that the two alternatives are "call Crunchyroll lazy" or "be happy with content restrictions", your logic is borked. There is the alternative of being unhappy with those who are actually responsible for the content restrictions: the Japanese licensor, for direct licenses, and the American home video distributor, for sub-licenses.


As for fansubbers being bloodsuckers, well you could take that view I suppose. Or you could say they provide a product which is not available through any other channel.

Both are true. The legitimate rights of creators are not restricted to the rights it is convenient of you to grant them. They include the right to deny the right to make copies in your country for not better reason than because the royalty contract costs more to write than the royalties bring in. Obviously the creator's rights cannot be effectively enforced, but that doesn't make it right to trample the rights of the creators.


And one final point, please don't resort to insults ever again. They add nothing, and are frankly childish.

Oh, irony. Lets repeat that quote:

It's pathetic, and is exactly the kind of lazy, contemptuous behavior which turns off customers and convinces them to cancel their subscriptions.


You can dish out the insults, but faced with just a mild bit of calling BS on conclusions with neither solid evidence nor sound logic behind them, and you start crying.
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Posted 9/26/13

agila61 wrote:


mendo_shutaro wrote: You can look at this two ways. One, that the percentage of revenue CR gets from any given territory should be directly proportional to how much content that territory gets. So, if the UK contributes 10%, it should get 10% of the content.

Or you could look at it like this - everyone pays the same, and so should get the same product.

I obviously take the latter view, you, I assume, take the former.

You are forgetting the third ~ the fair price is what it costs to serve you.

I already said that was the one I was using, so I don't really see why you have to assume I was using something else.


In my view, all non US territories are subsidising the US - we pay the same, but get far, far less. Of course, that's just my view, I have no idea of the actual numbers, nor do you.


First, what you pay in subscriber fees goes to the anime you watch. So all UK royalties either go to UK content, or go to content for UK customers who have found a way to trick the geolocation software.

Second, in a media rights system, getting rights to more content requires paying more.

All of your payments go into royalties for the shows that you watch, so unless you are tricking the geolocation software, it all goes to the series licensed for the UK. None of your money goes to the anime you are locked out of.

And at present, what you are currently paying, pooled together among all UK members, is enough to convince the licensors for 80%+ of simulcasts to include the UK.

Saying that you want to pay less than US subscribers means that you have to accept getting fewer series. Because the fewer royalties come from the UK, the fewer companies will bother offering UK rights to Crunchyroll. Remember that many of the UK series are sub-licenses, where a North American home video distributor requested broader streaming rights in order to get larger royalty payments from Crunchyroll by tapping a larger audience.

If Sentai decided that it was no longer worth while to get UK streaming rights, you would lose between five and ten series in one blow.


You also assert that only a small amount of non US subscribers are unhappy about being denied content. If that were true, that would be surprising for reasons too obvious to waste time talking about.

The reason you don't quote me saying that is because I didn't say that, so you can't.

I was referring to the people that adopt the position that you stated, which I quoted, because you said it (notice how you couldn't quote me saying what you claimed I said, because I said no such thing). That is the position that Crunchyroll could easily get 100% of new simulcasts and easily get 100% of catalog titles if only it would try harder. In your words,

It's pathetic, and is exactly the kind of lazy, contemptuous behavior which turns off customers and convinces them to cancel their subscriptions.


We know that there are a number of active UK commentators who hold that view. However, we also know that active commentators are only a very small fraction of total members, and we know that the Crunchyroll forums are not the only place where people talk about anime.

If you think that the two alternatives are "call Crunchyroll lazy" or "be happy with content restrictions", your logic is borked. There is the alternative of being unhappy with those who are actually responsible for the content restrictions: the Japanese licensor, for direct licenses, and the American home video distributor, for sub-licenses.


As for fansubbers being bloodsuckers, well you could take that view I suppose. Or you could say they provide a product which is not available through any other channel.

Both are true. The legitimate rights of creators are not restricted to the rights it is convenient of you to grant them. They include the right to deny the right to make copies in your country for not better reason than because the royalty contract costs more to write than the royalties bring in. Obviously the creator's rights cannot be effectively enforced, but that doesn't make it right to trample the rights of the creators.


And one final point, please don't resort to insults ever again. They add nothing, and are frankly childish.

Oh, irony. Lets repeat that quote:

It's pathetic, and is exactly the kind of lazy, contemptuous behavior which turns off customers and convinces them to cancel their subscriptions.


You can dish out the insults, but faced with just a mild bit of calling BS on conclusions with neither solid evidence nor sound logic behind them, and you start crying.


You really won't let this lie. I will however, so I shall draw this to a close.

What evidence do you have that UK customers are getting all the anime their subs will pay for, and that sub money is exclusively used for content watched in that territory. For all I, or you know, it could all go into a big pot, and more is spent on US licenses than comes in from US subs. I don't know that isn't the case, nor do you. I refer you to my point on transparency I made earlier. CR say nothing when they don't license big shows in big territories, they just pretend nothing has happened and totally ignore anyone who complains.

Oh and your last statement baffled me. You insulted me personally, but I didn't insult you, so I really don't understand your point. I called CR, the company, contemptuous and lazy, which to my eyes, they are. It was not directed at you, as you well know.
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Posted 9/26/13

MrJoMiMo92 wrote:

I don't think Crunchyroll can be blamed for not streaming Kill la Kill to the UK and Daisuki's latest announcement makes it more likely that someone else has picked up the exclusive rights for it.


Maybe.

But as CR have licensed it elsewhere and describe it as the MOST ANTICIPATED anime this season then they are setting themselves up as the target for irritation when they then say "Sorry, you live in the wrong country. No cool show for you."

It may be unfair, but until more information surfaces it simply comes across as CR not trying hard enough for the UK. Even though this likely isn't the case, it still feels like a massive slap in the face for a show to be on the /lineup page yet come up with a message saying "not available in your region".

Like it or not, from my point of view it is CR saying "Here's a bunch of shows, but you can't watch the one that interests you the most."
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Posted 9/26/13

TiggsPanther wrote:


MrJoMiMo92 wrote:

I don't think Crunchyroll can be blamed for not streaming Kill la Kill to the UK and Daisuki's latest announcement makes it more likely that someone else has picked up the exclusive rights for it.


Maybe.

But as CR have licensed it elsewhere and describe it as the MOST ANTICIPATED anime this season then they are setting themselves up as the target for irritation when they then say "Sorry, you live in the wrong country. No cool show for you."

It may be unfair, but until more information surfaces it simply comes across as CR not trying hard enough for the UK. Even though this likely isn't the case, it still feels like a massive slap in the face for a show to be on the /lineup page yet come up with a message saying "not available in your region".

Like it or not, from my point of view it is CR saying "Here's a bunch of shows, but you can't watch the one that interests you the most."


Well to be honest, it is annoying seeing tweets from Crunchyroll and Aniplex hyping up Kill la Kill when we have no idea if we'll be given an official stream for it. I'm just pointing out that this isn't the first time that AoD have blocked series from being streamed here, for example that stunt they pulled with Maoyu, Problem Children and Student Council's Discretion. during Winter 2013.

Back to Crunchyroll, I do understand why you are annoyed at them, hell I got annoyed at them too. They have been hyping up Kill la Kill this past month and when they finally announce it, it turns out they won't be streaming in the UK. Anyway we should wait for more information before pointing the finger. I've sent AoD an e-mail but knowing them they'll probably ignore it.....

If it turns out that the UK will be left out of one of the most anticipated anime series this year then someone should be held accountable for it, just unsure if it should be Crunchyroll.
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Posted 9/26/13

mendo_shutaro wrote:
Oh and your last statement baffled me. You insulted me personally, but I didn't insult you, so I really don't understand your point. I called CR, the company, contemptuous and lazy, which to my eyes, they are. It was not directed at you, as you well know.
An insult is an insult, whether it is directed at one person or a group of people. Most would consider "We think they're lazy, complacent, and pig headed" an insult. (You also once again donned the mantle of speaker for every subscriber in the UK).

The simple fact is if you don't consider CR worth the money, the solution is simple; unsubscribe and watch the free streams. Then you'll be "paying" exactly the same price per series as anyone in the United States.


As to the "we get less so we should pay less" argument, please point to an example of another international online service that adjusts rates for each nation based on the quantity of content they provide.

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MrJoMiMo92 wrote:
Well to be honest, it is annoying seeing tweets from Crunchyroll and Aniplex hyping up Kill la Kill when we have no idea if we'll be given an official stream for it. I'm just pointing out that this isn't the first time that AoD have blocked series from being streamed here, for example that stunt they pulled with Maoyu, Problem Children and Student Council's Discretion. during Winter 2013.

Back to Crunchyroll, I do understand why you are annoyed at them, hell I got annoyed at them too. They have been hyping up Kill la Kill this past month and when they finally announce it, it turns out they won't be streaming in the UK. Anyway we should wait for more information before pointing the finger. I've sent AoD an e-mail but knowing them they'll probably ignore it.....

If it turns out that the UK will be left out of one of the most anticipated anime series this year then someone should be held accountable for it, just unsure if it should be Crunchyroll.


AOD are DOA at this point, it seems. Something is going on that the rest of the UK industry isn't allowed to talk about. I suspect that tey and Kaze are on their way out of the UK, but it might still cause issues with UK rights.

In my case, i'm not really annoyed at CR. Well, I'm not annoyed at their acquisitions team.
Marketing guys are't doing themselves any favours by mentioning hype and restrictions in the same statements. If you start with "The show everyone's waiting for" and the end it with "And some of you still have to wait", well that's just really shoddy. It puts CR in a bad light that they don't deserve. but statements like that are basically painting a bullseye on themselves, when they aren't the true target.

No, I'm just annoyed at the overall situation. And not just with Anime.

I've been annoyed at the disparity between UK and American releases of all types of media for.... a short while now.
Like, when i first visited America in 1989 I started to realise how far behind we were on things. And how much we just weren't getting. hen I got online in 1994 and it was all over. Suddenly I started to become aware of what was out, where and when.

I thought geographical restrictions were BS twenty years ago, outdated BS ten years ago and unacceptable BS now.

I'm a fan of certain types of story. And I've just run out of patience with the UK getting shafted in regards to a fair chunk of the types of shows, etc, that I like.

A little upfront information from companies can help, though. It doesn't stop me disliking a situation, but when a company states exactly why something is absent or delayed, I at least don't get angry about it. Otherwise, whether they intend it to or not, it comes over as "We got it, you can't have it, we're not telling!"
And that is why people get annoyed at CR, even when the fault doesn't lie with them.
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Posted 9/27/13 , edited 9/27/13

mendo_shutaro wrote: What evidence do you have that UK customers are getting all the anime their subs will pay for, and that sub money is exclusively used for content watched in that territory.

That's how streaming royalties work.


For all I, or you know, it could all go into a big pot, and more is spent on US licenses than comes in from US subs. I don't know that isn't the case, nor do you.

If more was spent on US only licensed than came from US subs, they could increase their profit by just not pursuing those licenses. The evidence against that is indirect, to be sure, but the fact that as a start-up venture they hit profitability in less than three years says that the burden of proof is on you to establish that they are doing something that is so directly shooting their profitability in the foot.

And you have shifted the goal posts here (or the goal, if you prefer football to rugby). Your original argument was a strong claim, and required knowing something about how Crunchyroll works to be a valid argument.

Here you admit that you don't have a clue about how any of this stuff works. That is pretty much confessing that your original claim was not based on any evidence, but was just the conclusion you wanted to arrive at.


Oh and your last statement baffled me. You insulted me personally, but I didn't insult you, so I really don't understand your point. I called CR, the company, contemptuous and lazy, which to my eyes, they are. It was not directed at you, as you well know.

You said that when an argument turns to insult, it can be ignored, and you said that after you had already insulted the people who negotiate licenses for Crunchyroll.

If its sauce for the goose, its sauce for the gander. You can't pick and choose which insults "count" as undermining an argument and which insults "don't count".

As far as what you claim to be insults directed to you, If you find it insulting to have people pointing out that you are whinging about something, then stop whinging. If you think the whinging is legitimate and justified, then its not an insult, is it?

And as far as the original supposed insult, where I described your original argument as clueless, above, you admit that you original argument is, in fact, clueless: you admit that you have no idea how licensing contracts work. They involve a payment of a Minimum Guaranteed royalty, and a formula for how royalties are awarded based on viewership, and if royalties earned exceed the MG already paid, then residual royalties are paid on an ongoing basis.


TiggsPanther wrote: A little upfront information from companies can help, though. It doesn't stop me disliking a situation, but when a company states exactly why something is absent or delayed, I at least don't get angry about it. Otherwise, whether they intend it to or not, it comes over as "We got it, you can't have it, we're not telling!"
And that is why people get annoyed at CR, even when the fault doesn't lie with them.

When its the fault of a Japanese licensor, if CR was the type of company that went ahead and said, "Oh, that was Company XYZ who insisted on blocking you out," and then that company found themselves inundated with the kind of insult and virtriole that mendo_shutaro heaps on Crunchyroll, the odds are that Crunchyroll would not get any licensing from that company in the following season.

Better over the long haul for everyone if Crunchyroll shows the licensors that they can be discreet, and work behind the scenes to get broader rights when serious obstacles arise.
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Posted 9/27/13

TiggsPanther wrote:
No, I'm just annoyed at the overall situation. And not just with Anime.

I've been annoyed at the disparity between UK and American releases of all types of media for.... a short while now.
Like, when i first visited America in 1989 I started to realise how far behind we were on things. And how much we just weren't getting. hen I got online in 1994 and it was all over. Suddenly I started to become aware of what was out, where and when.

I thought geographical restrictions were BS twenty years ago, outdated BS ten years ago and unacceptable BS now.


Word. The fact that media companies can't see that with all these stupid restrictions they are only doing piracy a favour baffles me. They insist in trying to do business as if they still were in a world where everyone gets their media and information from them, dubbed and packaged in their local format. The world of popular culture is now completely globalized - everyone watches the same things, in every country of the world. There are anime fans in the UK and Dr. Who fans in Japan (and lots of people probably watches both). And yet, instead of seeing this as a wonderful chance to increase their revenues by lowering prices and dropping a few restrictions but increasing the number of copies sold tenfold, the companies try to be greedy and get everything - more customers but at the same price. And then they complain that people uses torrents and claim that they are stealing. Learn your basic economy shit, guys: when offer increases, prices go down.
brego1 
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Here in Scandinavia we're not getting either Kill la Kill or Magi, which are 2 of the biggest releases of the season. Licensing limitations is said. It's fine and I understand the argument. My question then is: WHO IS IT THAT HAS THE LICENSE!??

This isn't the U.K, Germany, France or Italy, large European countries were there are companies releasing this stuff either by streaming or DVD. Everything you can buy here (Denmark) is import either from the U.K or the U.S. So I don't believe anyone has the license for these kinds of series here. If anyone knows better or has information on that, please correct me. It just seems to me at this point that even though I pay full price, I get less than half of what others get for their money.
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Posted 9/27/13

TiggsPanther wrote:


MrJoMiMo92 wrote:
Well to be honest, it is annoying seeing tweets from Crunchyroll and Aniplex hyping up Kill la Kill when we have no idea if we'll be given an official stream for it. I'm just pointing out that this isn't the first time that AoD have blocked series from being streamed here, for example that stunt they pulled with Maoyu, Problem Children and Student Council's Discretion. during Winter 2013.

Back to Crunchyroll, I do understand why you are annoyed at them, hell I got annoyed at them too. They have been hyping up Kill la Kill this past month and when they finally announce it, it turns out they won't be streaming in the UK. Anyway we should wait for more information before pointing the finger. I've sent AoD an e-mail but knowing them they'll probably ignore it.....

If it turns out that the UK will be left out of one of the most anticipated anime series this year then someone should be held accountable for it, just unsure if it should be Crunchyroll.


AOD are DOA at this point, it seems. Something is going on that the rest of the UK industry isn't allowed to talk about. I suspect that tey and Kaze are on their way out of the UK, but it might still cause issues with UK rights.

In my case, i'm not really annoyed at CR. Well, I'm not annoyed at their acquisitions team.
Marketing guys are't doing themselves any favours by mentioning hype and restrictions in the same statements. If you start with "The show everyone's waiting for" and the end it with "And some of you still have to wait", well that's just really shoddy. It puts CR in a bad light that they don't deserve. but statements like that are basically painting a bullseye on themselves, when they aren't the true target.

No, I'm just annoyed at the overall situation. And not just with Anime.

I've been annoyed at the disparity between UK and American releases of all types of media for.... a short while now.
Like, when i first visited America in 1989 I started to realise how far behind we were on things. And how much we just weren't getting. hen I got online in 1994 and it was all over. Suddenly I started to become aware of what was out, where and when.

I thought geographical restrictions were BS twenty years ago, outdated BS ten years ago and unacceptable BS now.

I'm a fan of certain types of story. And I've just run out of patience with the UK getting shafted in regards to a fair chunk of the types of shows, etc, that I like.

A little upfront information from companies can help, though. It doesn't stop me disliking a situation, but when a company states exactly why something is absent or delayed, I at least don't get angry about it. Otherwise, whether they intend it to or not, it comes over as "We got it, you can't have it, we're not telling!"
And that is why people get annoyed at CR, even when the fault doesn't lie with them.


It does seem that Kaze maybe leaving the UK market but their recent involvement with Sony Movie Channel makes me wonder...

I honestly think that region restrictions are a load of crap and it's incredible that we're still being screwed by it in this day and age. These corporations fail to realise that it is one of the main reasons why piracy is prominent right now. What they should be doing instead of blocking piracy sites is to make their content available worldwide at a good price. Unfortunately they seem to view the internet as the enemy so they refuse to get with the times.

And yes, some transparency from companies would be helpful.
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