Post Reply Recent topics of Interest
Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 9/28/13
GWAAAH!!! I am so interested in random stuff!! Must.find.out.more
Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 9/28/13 , edited 9/28/13
IDEOLOGIES/FEMINIST MOVEMENTS IN THE PAST

Separate Spheres ideology during the Industrial Revolution - although basic idea was conceived way back. It defines and prescribes separate spheres for women and men. Culturally located in Europe and North America.
Dictates that men, based primarily on their biological makeup as well as the will of God, inhabit the public sphere – the world of politics, economy, commerce, and law. Women's "proper sphere", according to the ideology, is the private realm of domestic life, child-rearing, housekeeping, and religious education.The separate spheres ideology presumes that women and men are inherently different and that the sex differences as well as the resulting separation of spheres are "natural".

Cult of Domesticity or Cult of True Womanhood
It was a prevailing value system among the upper and middle classes during the 19th century in the United States and Great Britain. This value system emphasized new ideas of femininity, the woman's role within the home and the dynamics of work and family. "True women" were supposed to possess four cardinal virtues: piety, purity, domesticity, and submissiveness.

The women and men who most actively promoted these standards were generally white, Protestant, and lived in New England and the Northeastern United States.
Although all women were supposed to emulate this ideal of femininity, black, working class, and immigrant women did not fit the definition of "true women" because of social prejudice

Suffrage movements
Suffragettes were members of women's organisation (right to vote) movements in the late 19th and 20th century, particularly in the United Kingdom and United States. Suffragist is a more general term for members of suffrage movements, whether radical or conservative, male or female.
The term "suffragette" is particularly associated with activists in the British women's suffrage movement in the early 20th century, whose demonstrations included chaining themselves to railings and setting fire to mailbox contents (as Aubrey put it, extremely inefficient methods =) }.
British suffragettes were mostly women from upper and middle-class backgrounds, frustrated by their social and economic situation. Their struggles for change within society, along with the work of such advocates for women’s rights as John Stuart Mill, were enough to spearhead a movement that would encompass mass groups of women fighting for suffrage. Mill had first introduced the idea of women’s suffrage on the platform he presented to the British electorate in 1865.[4] He would later be joined by numerous men and women fighting for the same cause.

In UK
Women were not prohibited from voting in the United Kingdom until the 1832 Reform Act and the 1835 Municipal Corporations Act. Both before and after 1832, establishing women's suffrage on some level was a political topic, although it would not be until 1872 that it would become a national movement with the formation of the National Society for Women's Suffrage and later the more influential National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS). Women's rights were becoming increasingly prominent in the 1850s as some women in higher social spheres refused to obey the sex roles dictated to them. Feminist goals at this time included the right to sue an ex-husband after divorce (achieved in 1857) and the right for married women to own property (fully achieved in 1882 after some concession by the government in 1870).
Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 9/28/13 , edited 9/28/13
HISTORY OF EUROPE

WORK IN PROGRESS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_history#Early_Middle_Ages


Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 9/28/13
Utilitarianism

WORK IN PROGRESS
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utilitarianism

a theory in normative ethics holding that the proper course of action is the one that maximizes utility, usually defined as maximizing happiness and reducing suffering
Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 10/19/13 , edited 10/19/13
Hayflick Limit

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayflick_limit

number of times a normal human cell population will divide until cell division stops. Empirical evidence shows that the telomeres associated with each cell's DNA will get slightly shorter with each new cell division until they shorten to a critical length


Concept of such a limit devised by Leonard Hayflick in 1961

Events leading to its Discovery
Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 10/19/13 , edited 10/19/13
Cell potency

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_potency

a general term which describes a stem cell's ability to differentiate into different cell types. Potency is taken from the Latin term "potens" which means "having power."


Totipotency

is the ability of a single cell to divide and produce all of the differentiated cells in an organism, and example totipotent cells are spores and zygotes. [3] In the spectrum of cell potency, totipotency represents the cell with the greatest differentiation potential.


Pluripotency

a stem cell that has the potential to differentiate into any of the three germ layers: endoderm (interior stomach lining, gastrointestinal tract, the lungs), mesoderm (muscle, bone, blood, urogenital), or ectoderm (epidermal tissues and nervous system).[11] Albeit, cell pluripotency is a continuum, ranging from the completely pluripotent cell that can form every cell of the embryo proper, e.g., embyronic stem cells and iPSCs, to the incompletely or partially pluripotent cell that can form cells of all three germ layers but that may not exhibit all the characteristics of completely pluripotent cells.

Induced pluripotent stem cells can be artificially derived from a non-pluripotent cell, typically an adult somatic cell, by inducing a "forced" expression of certain genes and transcription factors.

Multipotency

describes progenitor cells which have the gene activation potential to differentiate into multiple, but limited cell types. For example, a multipotent blood stem cell is a hematopoietic cell — and this cell type can itself differentiate into several types of blood cell types like lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, etc., but cannot differentiate into brain cells, bone cells or other non-blood cell types.

New research related to multipotent cells suggests that multipotent cells may be capable of conversion into unrelated cell types.

Oligopotency

the ability of progenitor cells to differentiate into a few cell types. It is a degree of potency. Examples of oligopotent stem cells are the lymphoid or myeloid stem cells.[1] A lymphoid cell specifically, can give rise to various blood cells such as B and T cells, however, not to a different blood cell type like a red blood cell.[26] Examples of progenitor cells are vascular stem cells that have the capacity to become both endothelial or smooth muscle cells.


Unipotency

one stem cell has the capacity to differentiate into only one cell type. It is currently unclear if true unipotent stem cells exist. Hepatoblasts, which differentiate in hepatocytes (which constitutes most of the liver) and cholangiocytes (epithelial cells of the bile duct), are bipotent.[27] A close synonym for unipotent cell is precursor cell (which is a type of partially differentiated, usually unipotent cell that has lost most or all of the stem cell multipotency.).

Creator
57382 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / シンガポール
Offline
Posted 10/19/13
Character vs. Characterisation

WORK IN PROGRESS
https://www.goodreads.com/author_blog_posts/4936945-character-vs-characterisation

Character - is all that stuff you, the writer, know.
Characterisation - how you sneakily, subtly, artfully get it into your story so your reader can learn about your character.

Characterisation through Physical Description
Characterisation through Action
Characterisation through Reaction
Characterisation through Interaction
Characterisation through Dialogue
Characterisation through Thoughts.
You must be logged in to post.