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23 / M / San Diego
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Posted 11/8/13
http://www.logicalincrements.com/

This website is CONSTANTLY updated, just stick to this if you really don't know what you're doing.
It's also the best bang for your buck performance per dollar across the board, so just stick with it.
6010 cr points
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23 / M / Dublin, Ireland
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Posted 11/11/13
Core i5 3450
Gigabyte Radeon 7850, 2GB
8GB RAM
ASRock Z77 Pro3
80Plus 550W PSU
500 GB HDD


Cost me ~€650 last year. It does everything I need it to do, and it generally does it quite well. The only thing I'd really change is the HDD, I sort of skimped on it because I wanted to get as good I could get in terms of CPU and GPU.
10926 cr points
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26 / United States
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Posted 11/11/13 , edited 11/11/13
Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit SP1
CPU
Intel Core i7 2600K @ 3.40GHz 48 °C
Sandy Bridge 32nm Technology
RAM
8.00GB Dual-Channel DDR3 @ 931MHz (9-10-9-27)
Motherboard
Gigabyte Technology Co., Ltd. Z68X-UD4-B3 (Socket 1155) 37 °C
Graphics
VG248 ([email protected])
4095MB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (EVGA) 39 °C
Hard Drives
477GB Intel Raid 0 Volume SCSI Disk Device (RAID) (SSD RAID)
932GB Intel Raid 0 Volume SCSI Disk Device (RAID)
Optical Drives
ASUS DRW-24B1ST a SCSI CdRom Device
Audio
ASUS Xonar Essence STX Audio Device


The STX Essence is probably the best bang for you buck if you want a high quality sound card at a good price last I checked it was around 140$

the ASUS VG248QE monitor is one of the best gaming monitors which runs around 240$ if you live in the U.S I do not recommend buying it however if you really like color and do not own a colorimeter as its color is horrible out of the box.

Some of this is older but I've made some minor upgrades and I enjoy my PC.

Edit: That's the stock clock on the CPU, my current OC on it is 4.4 Ghz

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16 / F / イブキド
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Posted 12/7/13

dankuuwut wrote:

An i5 CPU and a GTX 260 GPU or higher. That's all you need to run all the current existing games on maximum graphics at about 40+ FPS. The rest of the components can easily be trash. Just make sure you get enough HDD slots on your Mobo. But you should exchange the GPU with a GTX 760 or better for new game releases next year. The CPU will run for another 2-3 years until you have to switch it out. The graphic industry is pretty stale right now.

That's 250 USD for the CPU, and
around 400 USD for the GPU.


Are you sure that its all existing games on max? Ive heard some games (mostly RPG) run slow on lots of computers.
Posted 12/7/13

Legion13 wrote:


dankuuwut wrote:

An i5 CPU and a GTX 260 GPU or higher. That's all you need to run all the current existing games on maximum graphics at about 40+ FPS. The rest of the components can easily be trash. Just make sure you get enough HDD slots on your Mobo. But you should exchange the GPU with a GTX 760 or better for new game releases next year. The CPU will run for another 2-3 years until you have to switch it out. The graphic industry is pretty stale right now.

That's 250 USD for the CPU, and
around 400 USD for the GPU.


Are you sure that its all existing games on max? Ive heard some games (mostly RPG) run slow on lots of computers.


If you take games like EverQuest 2 into account, their game's engine aren't optimized to support the graphics that you can crank up to. The same way that once you reach the 200 population limit in Age of Empires 2 the game begins to lag. And Age of Empires 2 is an old two dimensional strategy game that was released in the late 90's. So, your computer can run them just fine, but the game client can't. Anyone who says that they can run games like EverQuest 2 and Lineage 2 on maximum graphics without lag while attending massive raids and PVP zergfests, are, unfortunately, lying. In fact, none can run EverQuest 2 on maximum graphics without lag, even while they're standing alone in town, that is how poorly that game's performance is.

It doesn't matter how updated your computer is, you will have to turn down your graphics when you want to display a lot of information, because the game is coded to only operate so much information at the time. It's the same way that if you have a 64 bit CPU, you can't run a 32 bit operative system as if it was a 64 bit operative system. The operative system is forced to run like a 32 bit operative system because that is how it was coded.

If you take a look at really old DOS games. What's funny here is, if you try to run, let's say, Dig Dug, or Space Invaders, or my favorite, Frogger (Highway Crossing Frog), the game is going to run at the SPEED OF LIGHT. Yeah, good look trying to cross that highway mate, mwaha. Or saving the world from Aliens, whom, the moment you start the game has reached the bottom layer and killed you. Or that's how it used to be on old Windows 98, or maybe it was Windows XP. I forgot which. At one point these games ceased to work entirely (Windows Vista and Windows 7), and people rewrote them. They aren't that complicated to code anymore, apparently.
46359 cr points
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40 / M / End of Nowhere
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Posted 12/7/13

dankuuwut wrote:

If you take games like EverQuest 2 into account, their game's engine aren't optimized to support the graphics that you can crank up to. The same way that once you reach the 200 population limit in Age of Empires 2 the game begins to lag. And Age of Empires 2 is an old two dimensional strategy game that was released in the late 90's. So, your computer can run them just fine, but the game client can't. Anyone who says that they can run games like EverQuest 2 and Lineage 2 on maximum graphics without lag while attending massive raids and PVP zergfests, are, unfortunately, lying. In fact, none can run EverQuest 2 on maximum graphics without lag, even while they're standing alone in town, that is how poorly that game's performance is.

It doesn't matter how updated your computer is, you will have to turn down your graphics when you want to display a lot of information, because the game is coded to only operate so much information at the time. It's the same way that if you have a 64 bit CPU, you can't run a 32 bit operative system as if it was a 64 bit operative system. The operative system is forced to run like a 32 bit operative system because that is how it was coded.


Well, one issue is that the EQ client is a 32 bit client. Most older games are.

However, call me a liar if you want, but I have no problems running EQ2 or EQ or even SWTOR at max graphics without any real lag. And clients do not come any worse optimized than the SWTOR client. The modified Hero engine they use is just bad. I just got off a 16 man Nightmare mode op at max graphics, no problems. I used to run 120+ man EQ raids at max graphics. Even EQ2 I would be in the middle of zergfests with some lag, but not unplayable lag. Sure it is not 100 fps at that point, but 30 or so fps is quite doable.

One solution of course is more RAM. I currently run 16gigs of RAM on my primary with zero lag issues in any game that isnt generally server side. EQ2 does not even warm up the rig anymore. Sure there are zergfest times when things lag some due to the amount of particles, but these are rare with a good system that is correctly built. I just find a lot of people do not build their systems all that well.

Budget video cards are nice and cheap, but often come with less onboard RAM which hurts. Also, a lot of computers I find these days are underpowered and underamped. Everyone is so concerned about wattage, they fail to check to see how many amps are being pushed down the 12volt rail. Or worse they are running modular powersources with multiple 12volt rails, none of which are rated for the cards they are using. Just because you have a killer Powersupply does not mean you have enough amps going down the rail to power it correctly. Especially these days with the power hungry cards that are out there.

I also find pairing Intel with nVidia gives a better result on many MMORPG's than AMD and ATI. AMD is cheaper, as is ATI usually, but Intel is just a generation ahead of AMD at this point. And while ATI and nVidia are generally closer on the benchmarks, I find that Intel chips just work better with nVidia.

Posted 12/9/13
AMD 965
8gb
660 TI SLI

although I can't play very good since I play at 5760x1080
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29 / M
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Posted 12/11/13 , edited 12/12/13

Legion13 wrote:


Are you sure that its all existing games on max? Ive heard some games (mostly RPG) run slow on lots of computers.


Okay, you posted a VERY vague original post, that is why you are getting so much mixed information.

SECOND. paring a i5 with a 260 makes me laugh. The i5 is a high performance CPU and the 260 is budget gaming. bottom line the i5 will be bottlenecked by the 260. (aka, not reach max performance) An i3 would be a solid pairing with the R7 260.

Third, in MMORPGs, things can get VERY intense when alot of action is going on. and iirc they more cpu intensive then most single player games.

As for answering you questions.

No. This will run most modern games but not necessarily at max settings and such. You'd have to drop at least 200-300 on the graphics card to do that.

Also consider the current state of gaming. Some people think the environment is still stagnate but it's not. The new generation of console is out. This will highly encourage developers to code higher graphic games. Still a top end card will give you several years of solid gaming.

So Hear is my recomendations.

Budget end.

Cpu
IntelI i3 (any sandy bridge or later) or AMD FX 4350 or FX 6350
GPU
Nvidia 650 ti or AMD 7770 or R9 260
Make sure to get GDDR5 cards not DDR3. Also 1 gb is min but 2 GB needed for higher resolution gaming
Ram.
Any ddr3 ram at least 1330 or better 1600. 4 GBs min, 8 GBs if you run a lot of programs in background. Do not listen to any recommending more, you will never use it.
MB
You do not need a super expensive MB unless looking for OC or extra features. a solid budge gaming board from Asus, ASROCK, or Gigabyte do well. MSI is also a good budget brand but would recommend it last. Also make sure you are getting the right CPU socket for your CPU. B or H series chipsets are the budget end for intel.
PSU
Recommend Corsair. They are building friendly, the CX budget Power supplies are solid (better options out there especially from corsair) Most are single rail designs, so no guess work for AMPs on rails. Check Wattage requirements with PSU calculator but also check manufacture reccomendations and add some wiggle room for later upgrades. 50% extra is the rule of thumb. Also make sure it has enough/right connectors for what you are connecting.
Hard drive.
Avoid Green HD or 5400 rpm. you'll want 7200. I recommend WD blue drives, 1TB. or if you keep your HD relative clean (few programs and games installed you could try to get an SSD. you'll want to get at least 256 gbs or more if only using a SSD. you can get by with 60 gb if you have an HD for storage.

This will run most modern games at decent settings. Some compromises will have to be made on higher graphic games.

High end.

CPU
Intel i5 (i7 provides small boost in performance but terrible bang for buck.) AMD FX 8350
GPU
Nvidia 760 or higher AMD 7950 boost or higher R9 280x or higher
Most cards at this end have the 2gbs needed. Higher is only needed for multi-monitor play.
I do not recommend SLI or Crossfire. Single cards are more stable and use less power. consider SLI or crossfire for upgrade options later.
Ram
again 4GB but at this end really 8 GBs. For pure gaming Rig no more is needed.
MotherBoard.
again, ASUS, ASROCK, and Gigabyte. MSI gaming series are also solid. Consider freatures like crossfire or SLI support, ran slots and Sata ports for Optical and HDs. If overclocking you'll want Intel Z series MB. AMD use 990. Again, especially with intel, confirm cpu socket compatibility.
PSU
At this level I recommend a 80+ gold PSU. 500+ watts single rail will run most Graphics cards. I recommend Corsairs HX or RM power supplies. They have nice long cables, solid build quality that is highly rated, and all cables are compatible with all standard MB. They are also modular PSU making cable management easy.
Hard drive
An SSD is a must at this price range. again 250 GBs or more. Especially for single drives. Recommond a standard HD for mass storage. Western Digitals are highly recommended.

This setup should run just about everything with max or high settings.

I am not an overclocker but comment if you are interested in OCing.

Budget with intent to upgrade later.

CPU
i5 or FX 8350
GPU
650 ti or 7770/R7 260x Upgrade to 760 or 280x later. Other option is crossfire for 7770/260x or SLI for 650 ti
Ram
4GBs
MB
See previous two entries leaning towards high end.
PSU.
If you don't mind changing out the PSU, you can start with a lower end one. Otherwise stick with my high end recommendation of gold 80+ corsair 500+ watts or better.
If going with Crossfire/SLI later, need higher watts. Check with manufacturer for recommendations. Still recommended Corsair brand.
HD.
Start with a standard HD 7200 and upgrade to a SSD later. see previous recommendations.

Build Philosophy
Some components of a computer are harder to replace then others. The order of difficulty (in my opinion) are starting with the easiest are.

Ram
Hard Drives/optical drives (depending on case this may be after graphics card)
Graphics card
PSU
CPU (only this high because of handling care needed)
Motherboard.

So when consider a build meant to be upgraded, you don't want to have to upgrade the harder componets if you can avoid it. So sink more into your CPU, Motherboard and PSU. Upgrade the Ram, HDs, and graphics cards later with much more ease. Special note on RAM. I recommend 4 memory slot MBs when planning to upgrade ram later. This way you can still use the sticks you bought and just add in 2 more of the same. Graphics cards are easy to switch out or put into SLI/crossfire. Also easy to add some HDs, but that can vary based on case. CPUs and MBs are much more labor intensive to replace. Better to get higher options now then upgrade later.

Sorry this is so long but your question was so general. If you have questions let me know. If you'd like to give more input on your needs, Such as budget or space requirements, I can give you a more specific build.

And to the AMD haters.. if they sucked so bad why are they still in business? If it's no question to get Nvidia and intel, how do they stay in business? For pure gaming there is very little difference between the two. I am not talking about numbers and figures showing how awesome intel and Nvidia are. I am talking about real game play data, FPS and playability. A FX 6350-8350 rig running with a top end graphics card will keep up with an Intel rig with the same card. On the budget end it's hard to beat AMDs offerings. AMD entire FX line up and top end APUs are all OC ready. Only intels top end CPUs, i5 XXXXK and i7 XXXXk, are overclockable. Yes they do put off more heat, but this can be handled with a decent thermal case.

As for Nvidia vs AMD. Nvidia has nice developer features and good driver support. but for gamers the only relevant feature is advance Physx. Now first of all, you can use Physx off your CPU with either low end nvidia (which lack advanced Physx) or AMD cards. However it is not the same experience. If you don't care about physx, then it's all about performance. Most AMDs will run louder and hotter then similar priced nvidia, but will also offer a better bang for your buck. So if you can provide a good thermal solution, AMD wins. If you need cooler, dislike louder noise, or want Physx, Go Nvidia.


Edit: Noticed a mistake in a reccomendation.
Posted 12/11/13 , edited 12/11/13

tirusr wrote:


Legion13 wrote:




Are you sure that its all existing games on max? Ive heard some games (mostly RPG) run slow on lots of computers.


Okay, you posted a VERY vague original post, that is why you are getting so much mixed information.

SECOND. paring a i5 with a 260 makes me laugh. The i5 is a high performance CPU and the 260 is budget gaming. bottom line the i5 will be bottlenecked by the 260. (aka, not reach max performance) An i3 would be a solid pairing with the R7 260.

Third, in MMORPGs, things can get VERY intense when alot of action is going on. and iirc they more cpu intensive then most single player games.

As for answering you questions.

No. This will run most modern games but not necessarily at max settings and such. You'd have to drop at least 200-300 on the graphics card to do that.

Also consider the current state of gaming. Some people think the environment is still stagnate but it's not. The new generation of console is out. This will highly encourage developers to code higher graphic games. Still a top end card will give you several years of solid gaming.

So Hear is my recomendations.

Budget end.

Cpu
IntelI i3 (any sandy bridge or later) or AMD FX 4350 or FX 6350
GPU
Nvidia 650 ti or AMD 7770 or R9 260
Make sure to get GDDR5 cards not DDR3. Also 1 gb is min but 2 GB needed for higher resolution gaming
Ram.
Any ddr3 ram at least 1330 or better 1600. 4 GBs min, 8 GBs if you run a lot of programs in background. Do not listen to any recommending more, you will never use it.
MB
You do not need a super expensive MB unless looking for OC or extra features. a solid budge gaming board from Asus, ASROCK, or Gigabyte do well. MSI is also a good budget brand but would recommend it last. Also make sure you are getting the right CPU socket for your CPU. B or H series chipsets are the budget end for intel.
PSU
Recommend Corsair. They are building friendly, the CX budget Power supplies are solid (better options out there especially from corsair) Most are single rail designs, so no guess work for AMPs on rails. Check Wattage requirements with PSU calculator but also check manufacture reccomendations and add some wiggle room for later upgrades. 50% extra is the rule of thumb. Also make sure it has enough/right connectors for what you are connecting.
Hard drive.
Avoid Green HD or 5400 rpm. you'll want 7200. I recommend WD blue drives, 1TB. or if you keep your HD relative clean (few programs and games installed you could try to get an SSD. you'll want to get at least 256 gbs or more if only using a SSD. you can get by with 60 gb if you have an HD for storage.

This will run most modern games at decent settings. Some compromises will have to be made on higher graphic games.

High end.

CPU
Intel i5 (i7 provides small boost in performance but terrible bang for buck.) AMD FX 8350
GPU
Nvidia 760 or higher AMD R9 280x or higher
Most cards at this end have the 2gbs needed. Higher is only needed for multi-monitor play.
I do not recommend SLI or Crossfire. Single cards are more stable and use less power. consider SLI or crossfire for upgrade options later.
Ram
again 4GB but at this end really 8 GBs. For pure gaming Rig no more is needed.
MotherBoard.
again, ASUS, ASROCK, and Gigabyte. MSI gaming series are also solid. Consider freatures like crossfire or SLI support, ran slots and Sata ports for Optical and HDs. If overclocking you'll want Intel Z series MB. AMD use 990. Again, especially with intel, confirm cpu socket compatibility.
PSU
At this level I recommend a 80+ gold PSU. 500+ watts single rail will run most Graphics cards. I recommend Corsairs HX or RM power supplies. They have nice long cables, solid build quality that is highly rated, and all cables are compatible with all standard MB. They are also modular PSU making cable management easy.
Hard drive
An SSD is a must at this price range. again 250 GBs or more. Especially for single drives. Recommond a standard HD for mass storage. Western Digitals are highly recommended.

This setup should run just about everything with max or high settings.

I am not an overclocker but comment if you are interested in OCing.

Budget with intent to upgrade later.

CPU
i5 or FX 8350
GPU
650 ti or 7770/R7 260x Upgrade to 760 or 280x later. Other option is crossfire for 7770/260x or SLI for 650 ti
Ram
4GBs
MB
See previous two entries leaning towards high end.
PSU.
If you don't mind changing out the PSU, you can start with a lower end one. Otherwise stick with my high end recommendation of gold 80+ corsair 500+ watts or better.
If going with Crossfire/SLI later, need higher watts. Check with manufacturer for recommendations. Still recommended Corsair brand.
HD.
Start with a standard HD 7200 and upgrade to a SSD later. see previous recommendations.

Build Philosophy
Some components of a computer are harder to replace then others. The order of difficulty (in my opinion) are starting with the easiest are.

Ram
Hard Drives/optical drives (depending on case this may be after graphics card)
Graphics card
PSU
CPU (only this high because of handling care needed)
Motherboard.

So when consider a build meant to be upgraded, you don't want to have to upgrade the harder componets if you can avoid it. So sink more into your CPU, Motherboard and PSU. Upgrade the Ram, HDs, and graphics cards later with much more ease. Special note on RAM. I recommend 4 memory slot MBs when planning to upgrade ram later. This way you can still use the sticks you bought and just add in 2 more of the same. Graphics cards are easy to switch out or put into SLI/crossfire. Also easy to add some HDs, but that can vary based on case. CPUs and MBs are much more labor intensive to replace. Better to get higher options now then upgrade later.

Sorry this is so long but your question was so general. If you have questions let me know. If you'd like to give more input on your needs, Such as budget or space requirements, I can give you a more specific build.

And to the AMD haters.. if they sucked so bad why are they still in business? If it's no question to get Nvidia and intel, how do they stay in business? For pure gaming there is very little difference between the two. I am not talking about numbers and figures showing how awesome intel and Nvidia are. I am talking about real game play data, FPS and playability. A FX 6350-8350 rig running with a top end graphics card will keep up with an Intel rig with the same card. On the budget end it's hard to beat AMDs offerings. AMD entire FX line up and top end APUs are all OC ready. Only intels top end CPUs, i5 XXXXK and i7 XXXXk, are overclockable. Yes they do put off more heat, but this can be handled with a decent thermal case.

As for Nvidia vs AMD. Nvidia has nice developer features and good driver support. but for gamers the only relevant feature is advance Physx. Now first of all, you can use Physx off your CPU with either low end nvidia (which lack advanced Physx) or AMD cards. However it is not the same experience. If you don't care about physx, then it's all about performance. Most AMDs will run louder and hotter then similar priced nvidia, but will also offer a better bang for your buck. So if you can provide a good thermal solution, AMD wins. If you need cooler, dislike louder noise, or want Physx, Go Nvidia.


Lol, 760 is not a high end card it is A little better than one of my 660 ti and it should be in the budget part not high end lol, 660 tis are cheap as hell now so i dont know what you are talking about so you should change that to a 780 or 770

Also Nvidia>amd anyday
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29 / M
Offline
Posted 12/12/13 , edited 12/12/13

Homucifer wrote:


Lol, 760 is not a high end card it is A little better than one of my 660 ti and it should be in the budget part not high end lol, 660 tis are cheap as hell now so i dont know what you are talking about so you should change that to a 780 or 770

Also Nvidia>amd anyday


the 760 at 250$ is considered Entry level Enthusiast grade. Iast I knew the 660 ti was it about the same price range and the 760 was slightly better overall. Did not know about any price drops. I also am noting newegg is completely sold out ^^.

Quick search of Amazon shows 660 ti for around 230 without buying used. Either card is a good buy at that price.

I also never assume people are just made of money. So I don't suggest 300+ cards for people unless they specify they are an extreme enthusiast or have money to burn.


If Nvidia was better then AMD would be out of the Graphic card business. They have advantages, those I will not dispute and infact listed in my post. However, AMD cards perform well and many offer better performance per dollar. If that is what matters for you at the end of the day, then does it matter which brand you have?

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-card-review,3107-8.html

Note how R9 290 has better performance then the 770 but is found for the same price. Now the 290 is louder and hotter (I believe) but if you can deal with that, it is the better buy. Everyone situation is unique and declaring an overall winner like that is stupid and tells me your a fanboy not a tech guy.
3731 cr points
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16 / F / イブキド
Offline
Posted 12/12/13

tirusr wrote:


Legion13 wrote:


Are you sure that its all existing games on max? Ive heard some games (mostly RPG) run slow on lots of computers.


Okay, you posted a VERY vague original post, that is why you are getting so much mixed information.

SECOND. paring a i5 with a 260 makes me laugh. The i5 is a high performance CPU and the 260 is budget gaming. bottom line the i5 will be bottlenecked by the 260. (aka, not reach max performance) An i3 would be a solid pairing with the R7 260.

Third, in MMORPGs, things can get VERY intense when alot of action is going on. and iirc they more cpu intensive then most single player games.

As for answering you questions.

No. This will run most modern games but not necessarily at max settings and such. You'd have to drop at least 200-300 on the graphics card to do that.

Also consider the current state of gaming. Some people think the environment is still stagnate but it's not. The new generation of console is out. This will highly encourage developers to code higher graphic games. Still a top end card will give you several years of solid gaming.

So Hear is my recomendations.

Budget end.

Cpu
IntelI i3 (any sandy bridge or later) or AMD FX 4350 or FX 6350
GPU
Nvidia 650 ti or AMD 7770 or R9 260
Make sure to get GDDR5 cards not DDR3. Also 1 gb is min but 2 GB needed for higher resolution gaming
Ram.
Any ddr3 ram at least 1330 or better 1600. 4 GBs min, 8 GBs if you run a lot of programs in background. Do not listen to any recommending more, you will never use it.
MB
You do not need a super expensive MB unless looking for OC or extra features. a solid budge gaming board from Asus, ASROCK, or Gigabyte do well. MSI is also a good budget brand but would recommend it last. Also make sure you are getting the right CPU socket for your CPU. B or H series chipsets are the budget end for intel.
PSU
Recommend Corsair. They are building friendly, the CX budget Power supplies are solid (better options out there especially from corsair) Most are single rail designs, so no guess work for AMPs on rails. Check Wattage requirements with PSU calculator but also check manufacture reccomendations and add some wiggle room for later upgrades. 50% extra is the rule of thumb. Also make sure it has enough/right connectors for what you are connecting.
Hard drive.
Avoid Green HD or 5400 rpm. you'll want 7200. I recommend WD blue drives, 1TB. or if you keep your HD relative clean (few programs and games installed you could try to get an SSD. you'll want to get at least 256 gbs or more if only using a SSD. you can get by with 60 gb if you have an HD for storage.

This will run most modern games at decent settings. Some compromises will have to be made on higher graphic games.

High end.

CPU
Intel i5 (i7 provides small boost in performance but terrible bang for buck.) AMD FX 8350
GPU
Nvidia 760 or higher AMD 7950 boost or higher R9 280x or higher
Most cards at this end have the 2gbs needed. Higher is only needed for multi-monitor play.
I do not recommend SLI or Crossfire. Single cards are more stable and use less power. consider SLI or crossfire for upgrade options later.
Ram
again 4GB but at this end really 8 GBs. For pure gaming Rig no more is needed.
MotherBoard.
again, ASUS, ASROCK, and Gigabyte. MSI gaming series are also solid. Consider freatures like crossfire or SLI support, ran slots and Sata ports for Optical and HDs. If overclocking you'll want Intel Z series MB. AMD use 990. Again, especially with intel, confirm cpu socket compatibility.
PSU
At this level I recommend a 80+ gold PSU. 500+ watts single rail will run most Graphics cards. I recommend Corsairs HX or RM power supplies. They have nice long cables, solid build quality that is highly rated, and all cables are compatible with all standard MB. They are also modular PSU making cable management easy.
Hard drive
An SSD is a must at this price range. again 250 GBs or more. Especially for single drives. Recommond a standard HD for mass storage. Western Digitals are highly recommended.

This setup should run just about everything with max or high settings.

I am not an overclocker but comment if you are interested in OCing.

Budget with intent to upgrade later.

CPU
i5 or FX 8350
GPU
650 ti or 7770/R7 260x Upgrade to 760 or 280x later. Other option is crossfire for 7770/260x or SLI for 650 ti
Ram
4GBs
MB
See previous two entries leaning towards high end.
PSU.
If you don't mind changing out the PSU, you can start with a lower end one. Otherwise stick with my high end recommendation of gold 80+ corsair 500+ watts or better.
If going with Crossfire/SLI later, need higher watts. Check with manufacturer for recommendations. Still recommended Corsair brand.
HD.
Start with a standard HD 7200 and upgrade to a SSD later. see previous recommendations.

Build Philosophy
Some components of a computer are harder to replace then others. The order of difficulty (in my opinion) are starting with the easiest are.

Ram
Hard Drives/optical drives (depending on case this may be after graphics card)
Graphics card
PSU
CPU (only this high because of handling care needed)
Motherboard.

So when consider a build meant to be upgraded, you don't want to have to upgrade the harder componets if you can avoid it. So sink more into your CPU, Motherboard and PSU. Upgrade the Ram, HDs, and graphics cards later with much more ease. Special note on RAM. I recommend 4 memory slot MBs when planning to upgrade ram later. This way you can still use the sticks you bought and just add in 2 more of the same. Graphics cards are easy to switch out or put into SLI/crossfire. Also easy to add some HDs, but that can vary based on case. CPUs and MBs are much more labor intensive to replace. Better to get higher options now then upgrade later.

Sorry this is so long but your question was so general. If you have questions let me know. If you'd like to give more input on your needs, Such as budget or space requirements, I can give you a more specific build.

And to the AMD haters.. if they sucked so bad why are they still in business? If it's no question to get Nvidia and intel, how do they stay in business? For pure gaming there is very little difference between the two. I am not talking about numbers and figures showing how awesome intel and Nvidia are. I am talking about real game play data, FPS and playability. A FX 6350-8350 rig running with a top end graphics card will keep up with an Intel rig with the same card. On the budget end it's hard to beat AMDs offerings. AMD entire FX line up and top end APUs are all OC ready. Only intels top end CPUs, i5 XXXXK and i7 XXXXk, are overclockable. Yes they do put off more heat, but this can be handled with a decent thermal case.

As for Nvidia vs AMD. Nvidia has nice developer features and good driver support. but for gamers the only relevant feature is advance Physx. Now first of all, you can use Physx off your CPU with either low end nvidia (which lack advanced Physx) or AMD cards. However it is not the same experience. If you don't care about physx, then it's all about performance. Most AMDs will run louder and hotter then similar priced nvidia, but will also offer a better bang for your buck. So if you can provide a good thermal solution, AMD wins. If you need cooler, dislike louder noise, or want Physx, Go Nvidia.


Edit: Noticed a mistake in a reccomendation.

Sorry for making the original post so vague, but thanks for the recommendations.
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No problem. I hope I was able to help clarify things. If you have any quetions or want something more specific let me known and I'll do my best to help.

If you want to post or PM a budget I can give you some more suggestions. Even a ballpark budget would help nail it down.
Posted 12/12/13 , edited 12/12/13

tirusr wrote:


Homucifer wrote:


Lol, 760 is not a high end card it is A little better than one of my 660 ti and it should be in the budget part not high end lol, 660 tis are cheap as hell now so i dont know what you are talking about so you should change that to a 780 or 770

Also Nvidia>amd anyday


the 760 at 250$ is considered Entry level Enthusiast grade. Iast I knew the 660 ti was it about the same price range and the 760 was slightly better overall. Did not know about any price drops. I also am noting newegg is completely sold out ^^.

Quick search of Amazon shows 660 ti for around 230 without buying used. Either card is a good buy at that price.

I also never assume people are just made of money. So I don't suggest 300+ cards for people unless they specify they are an extreme enthusiast or have money to burn.


If Nvidia was better then AMD would be out of the Graphic card business. They have advantages, those I will not dispute and infact listed in my post. However, AMD cards perform well and many offer better performance per dollar. If that is what matters for you at the end of the day, then does it matter which brand you have?

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-card-review,3107-8.html

Note how R9 290 has better performance then the 770 but is found for the same price. Now the 290 is louder and hotter (I believe) but if you can deal with that, it is the better buy. Everyone situation is unique and declaring an overall winner like that is stupid and tells me your a fanboy not a tech guy.


What I am saying on your "budget pc" it should be one of those and your "high end" should list a 770 or a 780, the R9 280x is perfect on that regard.

And I would probably get the R9 280x instead of blowing a assload on a 780/ti but I would HAVE to have it in crossfire due to me using surround/eyefinity(in that case) or it would perform even worst than what I have now but I don't have 800$ to spend ATM on 2 of them.



And on the SSD to save money like I do you can get a small SSD at 60gbs JUST for windows since I have 2 regular HDD's(3 if you count my old laptop HDD) at 500GB and 1.5TB and I have no problems


Also why even bring newegg and that its "sold out"?
I have never once ordered from that site I always use ebay since I don't have to pay taxes.

And here are plenty to choose from ALL new

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_sacat=0&_from=R40&_nkw=660+ti&_dcat=27386&rt=nc&LH_ItemCondition=3
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Posted 12/12/13 , edited 12/12/13
I went to anandtech for help with my build, that and about 4 months of researching, reading reviews, watching videos. This is not to say I'm new to pc's, just was out of the field for a while took my time. My builds a bit over a year old now, won't bore anyone with details unless ya wanna know...

but 2 points i wanted to bring up which was the reason i made this post:

1. One of anandtech's forums users keeps a weekly update on a mid-range build, aiming for $1000, based on bang for buck at highest quality, not counting for keyboard, mouse, monitor, or OS current build is:
http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2192841

12/8/2013 update:
i5 4670K + MSI Z87-G55 + G.Skill DDR3 1600 8GB combo $387
GTX 770 2GB $300 AR
Samsung 840 EVO 250GB $170
Seagate 7200RPM 1TB $65
Lite-ON DVD Burner $18
Corsair 650TX $70 AR
Corsair 200R $50 AR
Total: $1060 AR AP

2. Everyone there insists on answering a set of questions, I won't list them all out, but you can find them here: http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=80121

they use them to stream-line the process of helping users out. It'd help us to help you, if we had the answers to those questions (if you feel comfortable answering them here).

I will say that the guys over there are very helpful as well, if you need the extra help.

I definitely recommend custom built even if you've never done so, it's a lot of fun and you'll love you system all the more knowing it's exactly what you want. :)

Good luck!
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You and I have different Ideas for what is 'High end'. Allow me to explain my reasoning.

Entry: $100 or under All about cost.
Mid:$100-200 I want some kick.
High:$200-300 More Dakka
Enthusiast:$300-500 I am demanding
Extreme: $500 The best and nothing but.

And yes you could save on an SSD by only buying one big enough for the OS but getting bigger allows you to put games on it. Which is nice. You could also use a 120gb and use Intel's Smart Responce to use it as a cache for your storage HD. I wasn't trying to go into too much detail because it was such a general answer.

Since I don't plan on using Mutimonitor gaming, I have no looked into it as much. I only heard that most recommend cards with more then 2GBs of memory. lucky the 280x has 3GB standard (at least at the cards I looked at.) However, they were having driver problems with crossfire and Eyefinity. I dunno if those have been worked out yet. Generally speaking I would favor a single card setup and much higher then 300$ you start getting a lot less for your buck.
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