Post Reply Does writing works of fiction increase your hype?
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Posted 10/7/13
Ok, so I have started writing works of fiction based on anime/manga and have noticed something. I find myself more entrenched, naturally, in the anime/manga that my works are based on, you know for research purposes, making sure I don't miss plot points, etc. In the process, however, I have acquired a strange form of shame when watching/reading the actual cannon.

Not shame directed at the show, mind you, but rather at my own work--specifically with character development. It's almost like watching the cannon brings me to think "Darn, they do a really good job!" Then I look at my work and...eh? Don't get me wrong. I enjoy writing and anime/manga, but at times I dread watching a new episode because I'm afraid that it'll blow my ideas out of the water, per say. So...it ALMOST, but not quite, makes enjoying the anime/manga bittersweet.

Maybe it's just me or something all people who write go through. What do you think?
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Posted 10/7/13
Some of the stuff I write is influenced by the anime I watch, but I don't write anything that is based on anime/manga. I may swipe the tone or the color or the atmosphere from a show, but I like creating my own worlds.

So, I guess I don't really understand what you are going through. Obviously, some shows are well done and some are not so much. I wouldn't doubt that, depending on the anime/manga, sometimes you do a better job of development, etc. than the actual show does. But don't forget that the people writing this stuff are supposed to be professionals. They've got a lot of experience doing what they are doing.
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24 / M / CA
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Posted 10/7/13
I've written a story during a time when I was highly influenced by an anime, though not one based directly on an anime, and I think I can kind of understand how you feel, but I can't say the same is true for me. When I see an anime do an excellent job of using an idea or a concept I used in my story, I just kind of find myself thinking 'I wish I could have done that in my story.' I guess I just tend to give props to the writers for doing what I couldn't.
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44 / M / Memphis, TN
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Posted 10/7/13
I believe you mean canon, not cannon. Still, I understand your dilemma. While I enjoy reading fanfics, I cannot bring myself to actually write one--I'm too afraid of failing the characters I love and admire.
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25 / M / Canada
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Posted 10/8/13
I don't think it's necessarily a matter of quality, to be honest. Maybe the stuff you're writing is great, right up on par with the canon, but the fact is that you're not using your own characters. I've tried my hand at fan fiction once or twice, but I just couldn't enjoy it as much as I can when I work on original stories. I'm okay with borrowing a setting sometimes (mostly for tabletop roleplaying nowadays though; I try to do original settings for fiction), but using someone else's character always makes me feel guilty. It's not about whether or not you're doing the character justice qualitatively, it's just that the only one who really knows how that character would act is the person who created him or her.

I think you should try out original stories. There's absolutely nothing wrong with letting something you've seen or read inspire you. Take your ideas from wherever you can, but mix them up, and put your own personal spin on them. Most importantly, craft your own characters. Mentally and emotionally, a writer is more in tune with a character they've created than they are with even their closest friends, because they know exactly what makes their creation tick. One of the major joys of fiction-writing is moving your characters around and making them interact. The reason I feel so guilty writing fan fiction is because I'm basically taking someone else's character and making it mine, which I don't feel I have the right to do. And if, for example, someone did fan fiction of one of my stories (I can dream, right? :P), I wouldn't consider the characters in that piece the same ones that I wrote about. They'd be different people in the same body. I can't say for sure, but I think that's how many creators must view fan fiction.

I think I'm probably coming across as a little harsh, and I apologize if so, but I honestly think that while fan fiction is fine for practice, every writer owes it to him or herself to move past it and do something original: it's the only way to get the full experience of writing, and to see how good you really are. You can get so much more out of writing when you use your own characters.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 10/8/13
I'm usually very critical of my writings when it's just finished and fresh. But after like 3 years or something, I went back to read my old writings and I thought to myself, "I'm a genius, did I really write this?".

I think people tend to get critical of their own works when they've just finished it, let it sit for like 3 months or something, then go back and read it, you'll think it's the greatest thing ever. (in my case, I thought my work was a genius with tons of grammatical errors).


English isn't my first language, so I know I'll never be able to attain perfect grammar or construct a perfect smooth sentence like Mr. Henry James, but writing, in my opinion, isn't about perfect grammar, it's about being able to express great ideas on paper--and that's what I'm able to do, so I'm satisfied with my writing skill.
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