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Will there ever be a borderline between cliche and originality in anime?
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Posted 10/9/13 , edited 10/9/13

Zeta-Nu wrote:

Cliche haters were the worst, because they didn`t learned their lesson, everything is always the same, ideas were always recycled.
Cliches is Inspiration,Cliches is Entertainment, Cliches never dies, Cliches will be like this forever.
History Repeats Itself.

Some non-cliche anime can be boring to me.
Here`s the list of my most and least favorite anime cliches.
http://myanimelist.net/blog.php?eid=738987


Cliches are more popular than anything called originality.
Posted 10/9/13

qualeshia3 wrote:

Cliches are more popular than anything called originality.


Yes, especially in books, movies and video games.
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Posted 10/9/13

Zeta-Nu wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

Cliches are more popular than anything called originality.


Yes, especially in books, movies and video games.



Agreed.
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Posted 10/9/13
If someone else says "Kuroko Basketball wished it was Slam Dunk" one more time, I will give up on my anime community.
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Posted 10/9/13

Ajcool33 wrote:

If someone else says "Kuroko Basketball wished it was Slam Dunk" one more time, I will give up on my anime community.


Ah. Wasn't Slam Dunk way before Kuroko no Basket and completely different disregarding that its about basketball?
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Posted 10/9/13
I'd go the direction of saying that severe reliance on cliche's are so often a result of really sloppy/lazy writing.

Part of the important skill is to put a different twist or perspective on a scenario to freshen it a little bit. If you don't , and you just run by-the-numbers, it's much harder to save a show... it's all about details.

...The bad writing just makes the cliche's more obvious, and it's an easy focus.

I have to say though, people are being a little too hard on the possibility of things having a fresh perspective. It can happen, and when it does it's often wonderful (not guaranteed of course).
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Posted 10/9/13

windsagio wrote:

I'd go the direction of saying that severe reliance on cliche's are so often a result of really sloppy/lazy writing.

Part of the important skill is to put a different twist or perspective on a scenario to freshen it a little bit. If you don't , and you just run by-the-numbers, it's much harder to save a show... it's all about details.

...The bad writing just makes the cliche's more obvious, and it's an easy focus.

I have to say though, people are being a little too hard on the possibility of things having a fresh perspective. It can happen, and when it does it's often wonderful (not guaranteed of course).



So cliches are fine if its done correctly or I'm mistaken?
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Posted 10/9/13

qualeshia3 wrote:




So cliches are fine if its done correctly or I'm mistaken?


Totally!

How many slice-of-life schoolgirl shows are almost entirely identical? Most of them are still enjoyable (to me) despite their utter sameness... because they're engagingly written and drawn and acted.

My theory is that cliche is just the first thing we notice when something is just bad (even as I put massive pleasure and notice on uniqueness :D)
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Posted 10/9/13

windsagio wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:




So cliches are fine if its done correctly or I'm mistaken?


Totally!

How many slice-of-life schoolgirl shows are almost entirely identical? Most of them are still enjoyable (to me) despite their utter sameness... because they're engagingly written and drawn and acted.

My theory is that cliche is just the first thing we notice when something is just bad (even as I put massive pleasure and notice on uniqueness :D)


I get what you're saying. I do enjoy some cliches while others aren't really working for me. I just see some anime fans cry out originality all the time. Yes. Some cliches are annoying yet some have manage to be in people's favor. Its one of those things that people go through when they get bad things constantly happening to them. Still...everyone is different.
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Posted 10/14/13


I get what you're saying. I do enjoy some cliches while others aren't really working for me. I just see some anime fans cry out originality all the time. Yes. Some cliches are annoying yet some have manage to be in people's favor. Its one of those things that people go through when they get bad things constantly happening to them. Still...everyone is different.

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Posted 10/14/13 , edited 10/14/13
There is nothing wrong with clichés per se, but I find that I really enjoy shows where I don't know what is about to happen, like Durarara or Monogatari. I think clichés are still quite enjoyable when done correctly, but it is rare that a show like that is memorable.
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Posted 10/14/13
True innovation or originality usually works out disastrously for the initial innovator, it isn't until the second attempt or even later on that the idea or concept would be well received. This is not universally true but more often than not is the way of things especially in an art and entertainment format, there is a reason that American TV is filled with "reality" schlock and formulaic sit-coms, it's not that producers don't want to innovate, it's just that they don't want to endure the beat down they would take from the public for straying outside the societal norms of acceptability.

So in actuality by the time an entertainment innovation gains enough acceptance to be put forth it has become the new cliché.

For example: "found footage" stories (Blair Witch, Cloverfield, etc.), "twist" endings (6th Sense, Another, etc.), fake reality stories (The Matrix, SAO, Log Horizon, etc.); those are all in theory innovative story models that are now regarded as commonplace clichés.
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Posted 10/14/13 , edited 10/14/13

Seabound117 wrote:

So in actuality by the time an entertainment innovation gains enough acceptance to be put forth it has become the new cliché.


It's a measure of safety, really. A viewer will see a movie or tv show that they like and keep an eye out for something similar to it. Why? Because they're hoping the similarity will give them what they felt was good the first time around.

Therefore, for an author or director, it's very important to make sure that your story meets those expectations.

A really good example is animated films in the US. Typically, their animated films are a "family comedy" that's "kid-friendly" with "heart-warming" moments. If a movie fails to meet two of those three expectations, people will find it difficult to take a plunge into that unknown territory.

If the viewers' expectations aren't met, films or animated television show do poorly until they are accepted.
Tim Burton animated films do fine, but the profit they earn is extraordinarily low compared to any other Disney or Warner Bros animated film.

Compare the well-received Frankenweenie ($39 million budget / $67 million box office) with the absolutely abysmal Planes ($50 million budget / $190 million box office) and you'll find that there's more profit in making an animated film that follows people's expectations or cliches with little to no care about the quality of the movie.

Unfamiliarity breeds low profit and as such, writers and directors are better off choosing from a genre or theme that's widely accepted and putting their own spin on it within the film or show.

At this time, an "American-style" animated tv show that isn't a "comedic" or "educational" does poorly. The only exceptions are "Super hero" shows. If anything deviates from the three, not only would it be hard to put on TV, it'd have a severely low number of viewers.

Does that mean an animated television show has to be one of the two to be accepted? No. You can look to anime and find romantic. serious, violent, and even perverted television shows that did just fine. However, if an "American-style" show tried any of the four, it would do poorly unless it portrayed its-self as a "comedic," "educational," or "super hero" show.
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Posted 10/15/13

Well_Spoken_Man wrote:

There is nothing wrong with clichés per se, but I find that I really enjoy shows where I don't know what is about to happen, like Durarara or Monogatari. I think clichés are still quite enjoyable when done correctly, but it is rare that a show like that is memorable.


True.
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Posted 11/6/13
I like a little bit of both in my anime (yes it can exist lol) however an abundance of either isn't inherently a bad thing.
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