Created by qualeshia3
Post Reply Would you read a fiction novel with great grammar but is utterly boring?
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 10/31/13
Explain your opinion in great detail.


My Turn



Bonus Question:

1. Know any fiction books with good grammar yet bores you to death?

Let me know if a thread similar to this one exist
Thank a bunches.
Bavalt 
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25 / M / Canada
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Posted 10/31/13 , edited 10/31/13
I can ignore bad grammar to an extent, but if it's really bad, I am capable of putting the book down because of it. However, and this is coming from an aspiring editor, good grammar should never be considered a viable substitute for a good story. A boring story with immaculate syntax and spot-on punctuation is still a boring story. People read fiction for entertainment, so the writer's primary goal should be to entertain.

On a related note, 'good' grammar, much of the time, can actually be detrimental to how the writing shapes the story. Text-rendered dialects, slang words, nonstandard spelling or constructions, bizarre syntax, and creative use of punctuation and spacing can add so much to a piece of writing, as long as the writer knows how to pull it off. Many of the most highly-praised works of fiction are so well-regarded because rather than using good grammar, they use bad grammar in a way that surpasses good grammar. My go-to example is Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, but it's something that you'll see everywhere in fiction if you look out for it.

As for myself, I like to think I have a pretty solid grasp on grammar, and I'm fairly good at using it or ignoring it to my liking to get the ideas that I'm trying to convey across. It's fun to give narrating characters recognizable thought patterns or mental tics, and it does wonders for characterization. It's still something that I'm working on though, and I'll probably continue to do so as long as I keep writing things, because I have such a strong interest in writing style.
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 10/31/13

Bavalt wrote:

I can ignore bad grammar to an extent, but if it's really bad, I am capable of putting the book down because of it. However, and this is coming from an aspiring editor, good grammar should never be considered a viable substitute for a good story. A boring story with immaculate syntax and spot-on punctuation is still a boring story. People read fiction for entertainment, so the writer's primary goal should be to entertain.

On a related note, 'good' grammar, much of the time, can actually be detrimental to how the writing shapes the story. Text-rendered dialects, slang words, nonstandard spelling or constructions, bizarre syntax, and creative use of punctuation and spacing can add so much to a piece of writing, as long as the writer knows how to pull it off. Many of the most highly-praised works of fiction are so well-regarded because rather than using good grammar, they use bad grammar in a way that surpasses good grammar. My go-to example is Faulkner's The Sound and the Fury, but it's something that you'll see everywhere in fiction if you look out for it.

As for myself, I like to think I have a pretty solid grasp on grammar, and I'm fairly good at using it or ignoring it to my liking to get the ideas that I'm trying to convey across. It's fun to give narrating characters recognizable thought patterns or mental tics, and it does wonders for characterization. It's still something that I'm working on though, and I'll probably continue to do so as long as I keep writing things, because I have such a strong interest in writing style.



I'm just too hard on myself about grammar and making the story enjoyable.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 11/1/13
I think so.

Henry James is a good example of an author who was able to compose perfect sentences that consist of good syntax and rhythm.

His stories aren't that interesting, but the sentences you read are magical.
Posted 11/1/13

GayAsianBoy wrote:

I think so.

Henry James is a good example of an author who was able to compose perfect sentences that consist of good syntax and rhythm.

His stories aren't that interesting, but the sentences you read are magical.


Thanks I'll check that out~!
Posted 11/1/13
I would think so yes, definitely give it a chance at least
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Posted 11/1/13
I'd probably at least give it a chance, since I have a really hard time putting books down unfinished, but I'd prefer a book with interesting plot and some grammatical errors (provided they don't interfere with the ability to understand the story; as soon as the grammar gets bad enough to make it hard to read, it has to be a really good story for me to continue).
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17 / F / Los Angeles
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Posted 11/2/13
No.
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 11/2/13



Simple and to the point...huh?
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17 / F / Los Angeles
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Posted 11/2/13

qualeshia3 wrote:




Simple and to the point...huh?


I see no need to read something that would put me to sleep, already had my share of those.
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 11/2/13



Ah. Okay then.
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24 / F / Ohio
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Posted 11/2/13
I'd try it. It might not bore me. Ill pretty much read anything.
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