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Being Politically Correct....
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45 / LV-426
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Posted 11/10/13
Personally, I detest the idea of PC. It's a way for the far left wingers to control what you say and how you should say it. The most glaring and condescending example is calling a black person "African-American". First of all, it implies that there is something wrong with the word "black", which most of us know is a crock. Secondly, I only met one person in my entire life who was black and had dual American and African (Nigerian) citizenship. That person, a former boss of mine, was literally African-American. No one calls me an Austrian-Italian American. I'm white. No big deal. And what's wrong calling someone with a physical handicap 'crippled'? There is nothing hateful about that word. If I were paralyzed from the waste down, I'd take much greater offense if someone called me 'differently-abled'. Once again, I would feel condescended to. Now if someone said, "Ha! Look at the gimp!", that's different. That's cruel. It's all about context.

Having said this, I consider myself quite liberal, both socially and economically. But all these soccer moms who believe that everyone deserves a trophy, even the tournament losers, is ridiculous. No. Only the winners deserve accolades. That's the point of an award. And again, I'd feel even more humiliated by a loss if someone handed me a trophy that said, "LAST PLACE!". (Believe it or not, this is a true practice....a product of the upper-middle class.)

Ultimately there is a huge difference between being practical and hateful, a difference that most self-righteous PC campus liberals can't discern.

For the record, one trend that I don't find P.C. is the anti-bullying campaign. Now THAT's practical. I'll let you all run with this now...I don't mind if you agree with me or not.
Posted 11/10/13

dirty_soap_dish wrote:
It's all about context.

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Posted 11/10/13 , edited 11/11/13
It seems people just want to be offended, like you said there is nothing wrong with the word black or cripple, but people make it a big deal for reasons unknown to me. I enjoy not being politically correct while still maintaining politeness and pose.


Its not all about context, for example if a waiter say he is serving the black man on table 3, he could be risking his job for merely calling the man black, people are overly sensitive and get overly offended even if its context is not derogatory or rude.
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28 / M / Long Island
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Posted 11/10/13
Digressing a little bit, Being both Black and crippled myself I don't mind those labels as I use them. I prefer Black over African-American as it implies that I'm from Africa yet I've lived here my whole life.

As for the crippled thing I don't mind it however I try not to use it in certain situations. I don't like differently abled as it sound like someone is trying too hard not to offend me. The labels like gimp and crippled don't bother me as I have more important things to worry about than that.

However what really bothers is how when I'm out in public people think that I need help doing everything, I understand people want to be helpful but it makes me feel like they think I'm helpless. Just last week a woman wanted to help me at the grocery store and wouldn't take no for an answer, she actually was offended that I wouldn't accept.

But anyway, I believe some degree of political correctness is okay, however like most things too much of it produces problems. These days it seems we probably are on the side of having too much of it.
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Posted 11/10/13
It's entirely possible to be left on all of the relevant issues, and yet utterly disregard the linguistic games.

It's far more important that someone actually care about equality, and humanitarian efforts, than to just simply avoid the appearance of being a racist while constantly voting for conservative bigots.
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21 / F / Balmer, Murlin
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Posted 11/10/13
This is informative:
http://grammarist.com/usage/african-american-black/

I try to avoid terms that I know people may find offensive. Why? Because I care enough to do so. It doesn't matter if it seems silly to me. If it's important to the person I am talking to or associate with, then I will respect their wishes. What is deemed "offensive" varies from person to person. I change my speech accordingly.

As for the statement on "trophies"... Here in the US, we have a race-to-the-top mentality and winner-centric culture. I believe the advent of "everybody's a winner!" that you see with kid's sports and such is a backlash against that. Parents are trying to bolster their kid's self-esteem and shelter them from the real cruelty of a winner-take-all society. Our society as a whole is trying to soften a little, which isn't a bad thing, per se. I agree that teaching people the importance of true accomplishment is necessary, but there's no need to create an atmosphere that may intimidate and discourage those who "lost" from ever participating, particularly in young kids. They are children, after all. Isn't it better to try and encourage them instead of knocking them down?
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20 / M / New York
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Posted 11/10/13
I see where you are coming from, but have you taken a sociology class? The push to be politically correct is needed when children (and those who are immature) are involved. Since children are information sponges who are heavily influenced by peers, anything even mildly racist or politically incorrect can have a huge effect on the child's thought process. If a person says something funny and his/her peers laugh and the child sees it, the child will replicate it for attention, regardless of if the material is offensive or not. Even in the case of adolescence and some adults this is true; its true of almost anyone who seeks acceptance from peers.
I could probably write an essay on this, but I don't want to seem too "in your face." >.<
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17 / F / Hinamizawa
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Posted 11/10/13
What pisses me off about the "African-American" title most is that every "African American" I know addresses themselves as being 'black'. Another politically correct title that I hate is "Happy Holidays". If it's Christmas and you're going around saying "Happy Holidays" you're implying that it would be wrong to just say "Merry Christmas". As if it weren't blatantly obvious that that was the holiday you're celebrating. What's the point?
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29 / M / A rock in the mid...
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Posted 11/10/13
I hate political correctness. It's a tactic developed and used by cultural Marxists, basically, to instill the idea of thoughtcrime, and then legislate it (see: many 'hate crime' laws). The idea essentially is that freedom of speech ends where another persons feelings begin. A completely subjective concept of feelings which can extend to any and every possible thing depending on what culture is dominant, being a basis to restrict a basic natural right, free thought and expression.

It's yet another tactic based around, not arguing rational ideas and concepts, but a purely emotional attempt to demonize any and all who do not agree with the authoritarian Marxist ideals hidden under the cloak of "liberalism" or "progressivism".
Ironically enough Marxism is completely opposed to classical liberal ideas, the foundation of the primacy and importance of individual liberties, and individual autonomy vs collectivism, and collective 'rights'(really privileges granted by the state), one of the defining characteristic of Marxist ideas including communism and socialism
Posted 11/10/13 , edited 11/10/13

Kraisis wrote:

It seems people just want to be offended, like you said there is nothing wrong with the word black or cripple, but people make it a big deal for reasons unknown to me. I enjoy not being politically correct while still maintaining politeness and pose.


Actually, IF you've ever talked to a person with a disability you'd know cripple is not an appreciated term. I know that pretty well. Calling a disabled person a cripple is not maintaining "politeness and pose"
Now, even disabled has come under criticism and now I think it's mobility impaired or something like that which is ridiculous, disabled is just fine.
Banned
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52 / M / In
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Posted 11/10/13
I am the most un-PC person I know and by that I mean I am the most honest if people don't like it then they can go to heck and you know what you telling a kid when you give him or her a trophy even when they loose? Don't try at life because it's ok to be a looser you will still be rewarded
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25 / M / Ohio
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Posted 11/10/13

dirty_soap_dish wrote:

Personally, I detest the idea of PC. It's a way for the far left wingers to control what you say and how you should say it. The most glaring and condescending example is calling a black person "African-American". First of all, it implies that there is something wrong with the word "black", which most of us know is a crock. Secondly, I only met one person in my entire life who was black and had dual American and African (Nigerian) citizenship. That person, a former boss of mine, was literally African-American. No one calls me an Austrian-Italian American. I'm white. No big deal. And what's wrong calling someone with a physical handicap 'crippled'? There is nothing hateful about that word. If I were paralyzed from the waste down, I'd take much greater offense if someone called me 'differently-abled'. Once again, I would feel condescended to. Now if someone said, "Ha! Look at the gimp!", that's different. That's cruel. It's all about context.

Having said this, I consider myself quite liberal, both socially and economically. But all these soccer moms who believe that everyone deserves a trophy, even the tournament losers, is ridiculous. No. Only the winners deserve accolades. That's the point of an award. And again, I'd feel even more humiliated by a loss if someone handed me a trophy that said, "LAST PLACE!". (Believe it or not, this is a true practice....a product of the upper-middle class.)

Ultimately there is a huge difference between being practical and hateful, a difference that most self-righteous PC campus liberals can't discern.

For the record, one trend that I don't find P.C. is the anti-bullying campaign. Now THAT's practical. I'll let you all run with this now...I don't mind if you agree with me or not.


What you talk of is veiled allusions. Let's say that you and me got into an argument, a really bad one. After all is said and done, pretend that I was the one completely at fault for starting this said argument and it caused you a form of trauma. Knowing my wrongful actions, I simply decide to bury it into my memories and if ever brought up, I will most likely refer to it as "that event". This behavior is typical and a form of damage control we subconsciously do. The P.C. term 'African-American' is our societal subconscious at work, masking the negative connotations that the word 'black' might bring. Is it wrong to do these things? That would depend on the ears of the beholder. Any P.C. term for the most part had good intentions, but I believe it gave the defined crowds too much 'special' attention hence separating them from the melting pot. This renders our thoughts of "African-Americans" and "Disabled" to be different than us rather than a part of us
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Posted 11/10/13

AshRandom wrote:

It's entirely possible to be left on all of the relevant issues, and yet utterly disregard the linguistic games.

It's far more important that someone actually care about equality, and humanitarian efforts, than to just simply avoid the appearance of being a racist while constantly voting for conservative bigots.


soo many assumptions in just a few lines..sounds hateful too. what an obummer
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Posted 11/10/13
Most people from Africa I have heard of dislike how we call African Americans African Americans while they are the African Americans. Sorry if that sounded weird, but I was trying to be politically correct.
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Posted 11/10/13
Guys, keep in mind that it's also politically correct to be against rape, school shootings, and drug addiction. Being politically correct simply means that you're taking action in a way calculated to offend the least number of people, and I see nothing inherently wrong with that. The only time it becomes a problem is when there are more important things to consider than what might be offensive. Ultimately, the interesting thing about the argument is that both sides are agreed on the content. "Black" and "african-american" both refer to the same thing. Hell, if we're saying that PC should go out the door, then "nigger" is term equal to both of them. PC is basically just another form of etiquette, and like most matters of etiquette, I would claim that you should aim be as polite as possible until it interferes with anything of import.
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