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Post Reply Your experiences with disabled people
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26 / M / UK
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Posted 11/22/13
In my time working in retail, people with disabilities always were one of the most challenging people to work with. And I don't even think it even them that causes the problem. When faced with a person who had a very apparent disability, it could be as simple as they are in a wheel chair, or something mentally, the issue I faced was that I wanted to come across as nice and friendly as possible without wanting to be condescending or seen to be looking down on them, but I also wouldn't want to talk to them too fast or make things uncomfortable.

I got around this by trying to get to know each person a bit before trying to sell to them, or fixed what ever issue they may have had. Its often said that people with disabilities want to be treated the same as everyone else, but sometimes I think thats easier said then done
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Posted 11/22/13
I've been disabled all my life. I had a disease called PAPA syndrome. It acts like arthritis except you can get inflammation not just in joints but soft tissue, muscle tissue, and skin tissue. I had major flare ups as a kid in all my joints. Elbows, knees, ankles, wrists, fingers. Then I turned 12 and i started getting inflammation in the skin. That means the skin swells up with fluid and it's a big purple ball and then it opens and turns into an open wound because my immune system couldn't heal my body. I had wounds popping up for over 10 years. Some remained open for five years, some remained open for two but regardless it took years for any wound to close and only when I was doing crazy drug therapy to close them. I finally got a bone-marrow transplant because I would have died if I continued to get all these infections because of the wounds. Lot of close calls through the years. Now my wounds are closed and we are working on fixing the left -over damage to the joints and skin left by my disease process. I still have to be in a wheelchair for long stretches that need walking like on UTA campus but I can get around the house with a cane. I'm 24 but I'm only 4ft 6 and have osteoporosis because all of the drug therapy over the years kept me from growing correctly and messed with my bones but my life is great. No wounds, not as much pain, and I don't have to worry about infections anymore. Life is good.
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20 / M / Eng Land
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Posted 11/22/13
I've had quite a few experiences. I've worked at a place which is sort of like a charity for disabled people. I only interracted with two people who were disabled during my time there (one of which was just an old guy who I don't think had anything wrong but I didn't ask). Some of my dad's friends have physical disabilities who I talk to. One has lost four fingers on one of his hands and the other needs a crutch to walk properly. I myself have hyperacusis where I'm put in pain when I hear high pitched noises. It was a huge problem for me in my younger years of school before I started wearing earplugs. I cried nearly every day going to school because I just knew I was going to be surrounded by noisy children. It also made me fear going out because I associated the outside world with my pain, and when you have parents who love going out to restaraunts because it saves them cooking, crying babies were quick to become my number 1 enemy. Luckily its died down a bit as I've grown older (or I've become better at dealing with it) but it's still slightly awkward going out everywhere with people seeing you wearing earplugs yet them not knowing why you are.
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24 / F / Arlington, Va
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Posted 11/22/13 , edited 11/22/13
When I was in High school, I had a class with this mentally disabled kid. It was my Spanish class to be exact. I feel like when you're in High school majority of the kids there are really immature. So anyways people would pick on him for no reason at all, They picked on me as well because of my weight, so I was always skipping that class (plus classes in general) but when I finally did go to the class he was the first person to talk to me.

He was all "Hi" I was like "Hey" and after that we talked, and he was a really good drawer! and he loved anime and batman. I always could have a good laugh with this kid. He was the most nicest person I ever met, I even added him to facebook. Some of the times when I would skip the class he would come find me and be all like "Hey buddy! why didn't you come to class today I was sad and had to endure things on my own" This made me terribly sad so after that day I never skipped that class because of him. He would even walk me to some of my classes. Yeah we created a bond and a good friendship.

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52 / M / In
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Posted 11/22/13
I lost my left leg in Iraq and I don't feel disabled or handicapped in any way I don't even have a blue placer for my pickup though I could have one if I wanted one
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29 / M
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Posted 11/22/13
I have cerebral palsy that affects my right side no control on right foot limited on the arm compared to my left which is by far better/stronger than most people's. I have never been a target for bullying though
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25 / M / Inside Lorreen's...
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Posted 11/22/13 , edited 11/22/13
I experience every day with someone who is disabled, my sister has Hydracephalus. I don't feel like going into a long story like a lot of others have here but the best way to put my daily life is I have to care for a 1 year old child who just happens to have the body of an 18 year old and is prone to seizures and can't learn anything past being a 1 year old. She can hold her cup to drink but she can not walk, talk (other than notice someone is there and laugh or something), or really do anything.

When I was younger I thought it was horrible that my little sister couldn't go out and play with everyone like I could, and I suppose I still think like that now but I have gotten so used to it I guess it just doesn't phase me anymore.

Edit: (since I actually read the full post) My sister personally that I am aware of has never been targeted for bullying, most people I knew were not complete asses and understood she was disabled, especially when it was put in the way of how I said earlier, she is a one year old who just happens to have an older body, kids seem to understand that easier at least.

I had been targeted a few times for bullying because of it I suppose, but thanks to some training (I guess??) from my Grandfather I never let bullying directed towards me bother me one bit in my life. Though like all males in my family I am a bit of a hot head, and I am extremely protective of my sister, so if anyone made a rude comment about her too my face about her being disabled, I probably caved in their face.
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Posted 11/22/13
I don't want to get into details or it'll turn emotional in my part.

I almost lost a leg due to a crime incident. I lost a lot of blood and muscle tone.

My physical therapist only trained me how to transfer myself from a bed to a wheelchair, wheelchair to a bed, from bed to the floor, then floor to the bed. She also taught how to put socks in my feet with a piece of cloth.

I did not like my therapist on that day. She's more into telling me her own injuries from sports than what I was going to.

I refused to be wheelchair-bound or had a ramp installed to my doorstep, so I was like, "meh. I'll figure something out."

I used my brother to help strengthen my legs. Did a lot of assisted passive range of motion. A lot of flexing and pushing.


Anyway, two years later, I got hit-n-run, and my legs were the first impact of the collision.


Past years later, I'm running two miles on the treadmill almost daily and I play basketball.

I was young and lucky.
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21 / M / On the Court
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Posted 11/23/13
I was a Peer tutor in highschool. We work with mentally challenge and the disable and I thought it was pretty cool. Some was harder to deal with then others but over all they just wanted to be treated like everyone else. I work with this kid name Luke and he would go crazy. I would have to restrain him because he went around hitting people, but never hit or spit on me. I guess that's why they gave him to me. But, he was a very smart boy learning words and items at a very fast paced. The funniest part is when I would cook a bag of popcorn he would eat the bag and stick it on his head. I had fun dealing with those kids.
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23 / M / Kaguya's Panties
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Posted 11/24/13
This video explains exactly how much I respect disabled people <3
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=442501949183327
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55 / M / Portland, Oregon
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Posted 11/24/13
pat yourself on the back > inflate ego here
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55 / M / Portland, Oregon
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Posted 11/24/13
You are Super Inspirational!
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55 / M / Portland, Oregon
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Posted 11/24/13
I am a single Dad with 2 disabled children.
One severely autistic but physically strong.
The other less autistic, but physically disabled.
Every day is a challenge.
I love them with all my heart!
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21 / F / Balmer, Murlin
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Posted 11/24/13
My father's friend (close enough to the family that I call him uncle) has a mentally disabled son. He's a couple years older than me. Really sweet guy. They can't pinpoint exactly what his condition is, but he has a speech impediment, which makes it a bit difficult to understand what he's saying (especially when he gets excited). He and his dad visited our house just yesterday, actually. Hadn't seen either of them since I was six or seven.

I knew another disabled kid in high school who I used to have lunch with all the time. Nice kid. It was obvious that not a lot of other students wanted to be around him (they weren't outright bullying him, they just avoided most of the disabled kids), so he would stick close to me and my friends during our lunch hour. He came up with some of the most imaginative ideas and was really fun to talk to.
Posted 11/24/13
i have a family member who is disabled. unfortunately i work very hard with him to accept that he is unique, and that being different is a great thing. I love disabled people, i think they are the most warm-hearted people ever. I use to take my family member to this therapy place for disabled kids, and i always waited in the waiting area, and i saw kids there all the time. I would play and talk with them. Their smiles would make my day. A lot of people discriminate against them, and i think its because it is difficult to deal with them. But i believe disabled people are the smartest and most beautiful people. i admit i use to beat up kids in elementary, middle school and high school for picking and physically mistreating my family member. sometimes a lot of people do not do anything, and that just makes me angry. in high school the staff would make those disabled children clean the school. i never knew that until i saw it and the staff was yelling at them for not cleaning the right way. i had to stand up, i took the broom from that kid and gave it to the lady and told her maybe you should learn some respect, and if you don't like how she is cleaning do it yourself, she is a student here and should be taught just like the rest of us, she is no different. the lady looked at me and walked away. it makes me sick to see how others treat disabled people.
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