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Post Reply Your experiences with disabled people
Posted 11/24/13 , edited 11/24/13
My sister has Bipolar Disorder.
She wanted me to live with her and for awhile and I was up for it.
I decided to hang around her a couple days to see how she is to get a feel for it.
She doesn't it like it when you tell her to do something,
she hates it when you give her any form of advice,
I don't fight with her and I try very hard to avoid it.
Sometimes she mimic's other people as if what they say is moronic and she makes fun of them.
The only thing she likes doing is giving me advice.
When I try and give her advice it's never good enough and shot down all the time.

She is a time bomb
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Posted 11/24/13
my father has been physically disabled all my life... it's very tiring and expensive, causes a lot of stress and physical exhaustion. i don't have a pretty view of handicapped people, but it's not like they can help it.

have taught an autistic child, and that was difficult too. i think it takes a very good and special person to help people with mental disorders.
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28 / F / Seattle
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Posted 11/24/13 , edited 11/24/13
I have expressive language disorder, which is classed as a learning disability. I like to explain it as "dyslexia of the mouth." I can write perfectly, but in real life it's hard for me to speak more than one sentence at a time. It's been a source of major embarrassment for me most of my life, and has made learning foreign languages very hard.

I've had several friends and acquaintances with various disabilities - some with several. One lady had a hard time recognizing people's faces (I don't remember what it was called) so I had to always had to be the first to say "hi" to her when I saw her, since she could recognize my voice. Another was misdiagnosed with autism as a young child, but then was re-diagnosed as an adult before applying to a government work-training program. What she actually has is a really rare condition, similar to down's syndrome. She's really sweet, but really, really shy and unemotional around people she doesn't know yet (hence the inaccurate diagnosis).

If you're interested in meeting people with disabilities, and you're in college, volunteering to be a notetaker is a great way (some schools may also offer some sort of compensation). Some people who request notetaking services will want to be anonymous, but others will be happy to meet with you. It's usually offered through the school's disability services, and anyone with an applicable disability can request it, whether because they have issues with their hands, eyes, ears, or anything else that affects their physical ability to take hand-written notes.

Taking classes in sign language (ASL was the ONLY language I didn't totally flop at, lol) is a good way to meet deaf people. Talking with deaf-blind people is a really fascinating experience.
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Posted 11/25/13 , edited 11/25/13
I will check it out. I miss Kagura's voice







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Posted 11/25/13
Some interesting stories here. Thank you all for sharing!

It warms my heart to see how supportive everyone here is. Good on you for being able to look beyond the disability and treat everyone equally.

And those of you who mentioned someone who has passed away, I give you my condolences.
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24 / F / Johnstown, PA, USA
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Posted 11/26/13 , edited 11/26/13
I have ADHD, specifically what used to be called "ADD." I take Tyrosine, an amino acid, for it. MY ADD is dangerous, because it would even affect my driving if I weren't to take something. I've had several close calls on the road before I took prescription medication, while taking the prescription medication, and after I switched from the prescription and was still working out the proper dosages to take of Tyrosine. It was at it's worst when I was taking Focalin, which, ironically, is supposed to treat it. Apparently, the Focalin was having a bad interaction with Lexapro. It also turned out that I didn't need Lexapro at all (an antidepressant), and that I was just going through grieving and didn't actually suffer from depression.
In short:
anti-depressants + anti-"ADD" = worse ADHD and chemically-induced depression.
I was pissed, because my former psychiatrist should have known better. Maybe he did, but was too greedy to care? Either way, I ditched him ASAP, and started taking Tryosine. Focalin's possible side effects are scary, anyway, so I was happy to switch. Also, about a year or two ago (after I had already stopped taking it), warnings about birth defects associated with Lexapro started circulating television.
I still have some issues with fighting the ADHD, and I occasionally find myself in willful denial of the symptoms; however, it's pretty manageable.

My maternal grandma and grandpa have dementia. It's sad to watch them slowly lose themselves.

My little sister has spastic CP. She's been letting her legs regress quite a bit, so it's going to bite her in the ass later in life. I've warned her countless times about her needing to stretch her legs on a regular basis, and so has our mother. She stubbornly refuses to listen. I'll eventually get to say, "I told you so."
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34 / M / Oregon
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Posted 11/26/13
My younger brothers had some complications, the youngest was unable to form words until he was 11 and even now he speech can be difficult to follow, but no doctor has ever provided a diagnosis of why his speech is why it is out side of him having ADHD. He frequently had people harassing him because of his inability to speak and I got to be his translator for communicating at times other times it was scaring away would be attackers whether it be verbal or physical. My other brother was diagnosed with ADHD and just recently with the same genetic disorder as me that at least causes blindness and possibly the loss of other senses, retinitis pigmentosa. Most of the time it was just standing up for them since they got bullied a lot and we never seemed to live in one place for to long, so I got pretty used to having to routinely stand up for them. With retinitis pigmentosa or RP for short your eyes don't cloud over to give a visual clue to others that you can't see.
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22 / M / Alabama
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Posted 12/1/13
My cousin (20) was in a wheelchair all her life and all of the family were used to it and did everything to help her. It wasn't a mental disability but rather she attained a disease that cut off all communication to her legs. I was too young to realize it but as I grew up I saw it as normal. One time my and uncle and I were going to the store with my cousin and this jerk parks in the handicapped spot and he didnt even need it. I got out of the car (I'm 12 when this happended) and tried to fight this 20ish something punk. Of course that didn;t turn out well but I was absolutely ticked off cause he said it didnt really matter and that she could go the extra 20 ft the store. She passed away recently but whenever I see someone with a disability, I am reminded of her and try to help anyone in that position
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Posted 2/18/14
Just checking back over this thread months later, it's nice to see how varied a community of people we have here on CR.
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Posted 2/18/14
My experience with disabled people is easily defined by a quick look in the mirror.
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27 / M / Mor Dhona
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Posted 2/18/14
Whoa. A place to share my troubles and speak of the people I've heard of with similar problems?

Well I have Schizoid Personality Disorder; to oversimplify, I'm asocial. The problem is that being asocial I really don't care what anyone thinks of me, so I'm the stereotypical "neckbeard who lives in his parents' basement" type. It wasn't always this way... I used to be in the US Air Force, you know. But, well, getting a little depressed around Christmastime and sent to the crazy house got diagnosed with the PD, which was upheld by the military doctor, which gave me a one-way ticket out the door.

I've tried to reverse it, but because any second opinion isn't in the military environment, which is "unique[,] and symptoms may not surface when removed from it" am stuck in a Catch-22.

Anyway, I've not met a lot of people with physical handicaps, but I did meet plenty of crazies in the crazy house, and for the most part they're just people. One woman was brain-damaged, I think, but everyone else (save for fresh-off-the-streets druggies) were just struggling with themselves. Too many see people with disabilities as being defined by those problems; while it's certainly true in my case (though I wish it weren't) for the most part disabled people are still... people.
Posted 2/18/14
My aunt is schizophrenic, but I treat her just like any other elder of mine.
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Posted 2/18/14 , edited 2/18/14
When I was in high school, the special kids had their designated tables, both inside the cafeteria and outside. One day, they were eating outside and the teacher who was supervising them had left to get a carton of milk for a student who forgot to get one. Well, this stupid ghetto broad comes up and spits in a girl's milk, and says a few very nasty and harmful things. Without hesitation, a female friend of mine sees what has happened and beats the living hell out of the stupid b***h. It wasn't a silly cat fight either. I probably couldn't have done a better job myself. The stupid girl was expelled (she was already on thin ice anyways), and my friend's actions were excused after we clearly explained what had happened. I have helped the special kids at school from time to time, but that was by far the most memorable story. Everyone one won in the end. Except for the stupid girl. She doesn't matter and deserves to suffer.
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23 / M / California
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Posted 2/18/14
You know what? Fuck it. I'm going to own up to this. Genetics are a roll of 46 dice, and I rolled Autism. What am I saying? I can't claim this! I'm... no! I'm stronger than my birthright! I am an obelisk standing in defile of DNA itself to deliver this message! I've spent twenty years battling a genetic rip tide to emerge as the one who walks with the rest of society, detached from the plague; uplifted of my own accord to write happiness into human hearts! I'm not the best writer, I'm a rifle's shot away from drawing anything worth focusing red faulted eyes upon, but I'm strong! Strong enough to lift myself and one day everyone else who's ever been put down hard in this world!
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Posted 2/18/14
My little brother has autism and sometimes he's either very happy and friendly than his mood will change drastically to destroying everything than crying for no reason. It's very difficult, but you'll eventually get used to it. He needs the most attention out of my family. My dad is bipolar, but it's not as hard to deal with as people make it to be.
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