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Post Reply Your experiences with disabled people
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19 / M / Maryland
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Posted 2/18/14
I have ADHD, but I wouldn't call myself disabled
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54 / M / Tacoma, WA. wind...
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Posted 2/18/14 , edited 2/18/14
Most of the time I try my best to get along with disabled people. Sometimes I have to be more patient but that comes with the experience. When I was going through confirmation class, (ELCA Lutheran), our pastor took us on a field trip to the North Dakota State Hospital in Jamestown, ND. It was a bit overwhelming, so many people who could not function without constant help. This was back in the days when people with Aspergers, ADHD and the like were still told to "tuff-it-up" and "get straitened out", they really didn't know very much about those things. The NDSH was mostly for people that were retarded or had rather severe mental health problems. I just remember all the people who were sitting in wheelchairs (some were strapped in) and thinking, "my worst problems are pretty much moot compared to these people," it was a pretty sad place... I think "empathy" or "sympathy" was one (or both) of the lessons our pastor was trying to teach us. Trouble is over the last couple of decades it has gotten worse. Here in America there is less space for the mentally ill and most of them end up in jail cells, our lack of tax dollars at work. Too often on the news for Portland/Vancouver or Seattle/Tacoma is someone who was mentally ill died in police custody.

I've known a number of people with different disabilities, ranging from Aspergers to Down syndrome, to Cerebral Palsy, most of them turned out to be interesting people, good people. Some of them, like the rest of society, could be jerks. One fellow that I'd kept in touch with for years was starting to be abusive when ever we talked and I reluctantly decided not to contact him any more.
Hopefully he found some kind of peace.

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49 / F / Center of the Uni...
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Posted 2/18/14
well... hmmm

almost 20 years ago I was a Developmental service worker.
for the last 13+ I've been a nurse working in Long Term Care.
Before that I was in Complex Continuing Care. One of my clients was so... heavy... that WSIB wouldn't pay for our injuries unless there were five staff just to turn her on her side, and she needed a speciall heavy duty 'person crane', and her wheelchair was more of wheel love seat.
I have a good friend with Aspberger's Syndrome (although I'm told it's been removed from the DSM V and it's now just high functioning Autism)
Another good friend (perhaps my best friend) copes very well with his epilepsy and probably knows more about his variant of the illness than his Neurologist.
One of my (now deceased Aunts) had crippling arthritis and was a pioneer in knee replacements
Another Uncle and a Cousin both died of Cancer
I have a couple of things going on with myself, Bipolar (recently Diagnosed replacing an earlier diagnosis of Depression), Gender Dysphoria and lately do to some ... stuff... that went down at work, severely paralyzing anxiety about not being PERFECT at work.

I guess you could say. I'm familiar with disabilities.
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25 / M
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Posted 2/18/14
One of my friends has tourettes syndrome. He sporadically swears and shouts some racial slurs, but he's still nice.
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22 / M
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Posted 2/18/14
Well, I had a friend in middle school who had Aspergers. Honestly, didn't even know until somebody told me. Still didn't care when they told me. He was a fairly interesting person, and we liked similar things.

Girl I'm friends with now has Cerebral Palsy. I treat her like I treat everyone else, with dispassion and relentless teasing. Of course, I'll tease her about anything but her Cerebral Palsy. Too easy of a target.

I've probably have messed around with other people who have 'disabilities,' but none come to mind. People think I have a couple myself, but I don't really care if I do or not. Let's see. People have thought I was ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Aspergers. 'Course, they change their minds after a while.

Basically, I don't care for people with disabilities any more or less than anyone else. If they're interesting, I'll care. If they're not, I won't. Nothing else factors in. Simple.
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30 / M / Newport News, VA
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Posted 2/19/14
My mother is considered to be disabled by the US Army. She injured her back when she flipped over a barrier while on guard duty. She also has neck problems from an accident that involved being rear-ended while in a HMMWV. To add to that, she also has knee problems that also arose in the Army. However, she refuses to let the pain get the best of her and continues to serve in the Virginia Army National Guard as well as work in a civilian capacity at McDonald Army Health Center on Ft. Eustis, VA. While her disabled status is only on her military record, it still counts as such. It's also nowhere near as debilitating as what is described in other posts. Even so, there are times where she needs help due to how much pain she is in and that is why I continue to live with her.
Punk29 
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19 / F / England
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Posted 2/19/14
Loads actually o-O
I myself have severe depression and post traumatic disorder - which gives me panic attacks, constant anxiety and it affects my concentration a lot.
My ex-boyfriend had autism, and to be honest he was a really nice guy - sadly I just didn't have the patience to deal with someone autistic who constantly required one sided attention, he also complained a lot and didn't really think of my feelings a lot. But that was just his autism. As lovely as he was, I just couldn't relate to him and we thought too differently - it just didn't work out.

My current boyfriends Mum, who is my carer (I am empancipated) is physically disabled as she broke her back in the army. She can walk short distances but has to use a wheel chair most of the time as well as always having to be on a lot of pain killers.

But that's about it XD
Sogno- 
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Posted 2/19/14
my father has been handicapped all my life, as a child i thought it was weird everyone else didn't have a father with a walker/wheelchair

one thing i always tell myself is "it is what it is", things like that you can't change and you might as well carry on
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25 / F / in the land of th...
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Posted 2/19/14

Lethargic_leopard_Seal wrote:

You know what? Fuck it. I'm going to own up to this. Genetics are a roll of 46 dice, and I rolled Autism. What am I saying? I can't claim this! I'm... no! I'm stronger than my birthright! I am an obelisk standing in defile of DNA itself to deliver this message! I've spent twenty years battling a genetic rip tide to emerge as the one who walks with the rest of society, detached from the plague; uplifted of my own accord to write happiness into human hearts! I'm not the best writer, I'm a rifle's shot away from drawing anything worth focusing red faulted eyes upon, but I'm strong! Strong enough to lift myself and one day everyone else who's ever been put down hard in this world!


You are a wonder!!

So very talented....I love it...

Blessed Be.

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25 / F / in the land of th...
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Posted 2/19/14
ADHD can be a blessing...

I know several ....I love their minds, I adore their souls,,, humor, and of course their pride.
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41 / F / Sitting under a B...
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Posted 2/19/14
My son has sensory processing disorder and asperger's syndrome which is yes... being removed as a name from the autistic charts... and being called one of many in the autism spectrum disorder, my daughter has fibromyalgia. People used to call my son retarded in school because he wouldn't talk much at all.... he would fully analyze a person speaking with him and make the choice to talk or not. My daughter, people would tease her left and right while in school while being in a wheelchair... until my son would pop around the corner and punch a kid... ofc with a smile on his face.. especially when someone would absolutely disrespect his sister because of being in a wheelchair. Being they were both in the same school and just a few years apart... they were the best advocate for each other while in school when I couldn't be there from being at work. Their real friends... are absolutely amazing, mixed with people who are normal and people with disabilities.

I ofc have all internal birth defects. Double ureter right kidney, refluxing ureters [ all 3], refluxing urethra.In short and quite laymen terms, instead of voiding, it will pick a kidney, back up into it, and bruise everything which results in excruciating pain ofc, and either total loss of control or not being able to go without the help of a catheter. When I have to wear a catheter... you will catch me clipping it to a pants pocket... it''s no big deal... and I do consider it an accessory to an outfit.... a quite necessary one... it's a "normal" way of life.

One thing I can actually say, it seems like it's "easier" being born that way versus developing something later in life.... meaning... when born with some abnormality, it's the only thing you know.... and it's your normal.... versus developing something later in life.... then you know it's not normal and have to adjust to things the way they are.

FYI in a house full of different disabilities.... we end up laughing at and with each other... about our major snafu's. If you can't laugh with and at yourself.... you can't laugh with someone else
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52 / M / In
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Posted 2/19/14

datamonger128 wrote:

My mother is considered to be disabled by the US Army. She injured her back when she flipped over a barrier while on guard duty. She also has neck problems from an accident that involved being rear-ended while in a HMMWV. To add to that, she also has knee problems that also arose in the Army. However, she refuses to let the pain get the best of her and continues to serve in the Virginia Army National Guard as well as work in a civilian capacity at McDonald Army Health Center on Ft. Eustis, VA. While her disabled status is only on her military record, it still counts as such. It's also nowhere near as debilitating as what is described in other posts. Even so, there are times where she needs help due to how much pain she is in and that is why I continue to live with her.


A salute to your mom from one ol beat up warrior to another much respect

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Posted 2/19/14 , edited 2/19/14
My mother suffers from the physical hernia where her large intestine broke through the muscle wall of her abdomin. Despite 3 weeks in intensive care, the repairs done were simply enough to put everything back together. The result is that her stomach constantly hangs out a bit and she can't do anything that involve the use of abdominal muscles.

The result of this has left her obsessively spending excessive amount of time on the internet exploring political rumors and hubub which she believes whole-heartedly regardless of source. She also leaves the TV on all day, blasting a television channel that has nothing but preachers on it.

She has healed enough that she can once again continue simple household activities, but has very little endurance.

My father (whom divorced my mom about 15 years ago) suffers from irreversible cerebellar ataxia. In other words, his cerebellum is decaying.

You'd be surprised how important your cerebellum is. When the condition was in its early stages, my dad would stumble and fumble his words. Over time it has gotten worse. My father can no longer has control over his physical stability. Walking, for him, is like running during an earthquake, eating involves him coughing up his food and gasping for air now and then, listening to him speak is like comprehending the words of a drunk, he YELLS in his sleep, he falls out of bed, and he is so impatient with his own body that he is absolutely intolerable and impatient with everyone around him.

If my father wants anything, he wants it "F#$&ING NOW!!" (except he doesn't sound that crisp.) If he knocks on my sister's door, he EXPECTS her to already be opening it the moment his knock ends. If not, he shouts, then he BANGS on the door, then he yells. And when the door opens, he'll go "DO YOU HAVE SCHOOL TODAY!?" in the most incomprehensible mouth full of spit word fumbling was possible. Oh.. did I mention he was the most OCD person in the world BEFORE his condition? You should see what his OCD now that he can't control his speech, his walking, his eating, or his patience..

Oh.. also.. he gets very lonely.. on a daily basis. So he'll do odd things like make popcorn a few days ahead of my day off of work in the hopes that I'll watch movies with him (he has a rather good popcorn maker.) He also likes to stop me and have long chats. I think the Cabin Fever gets to him a little since he recently lost his ability to drive..

The result of their conditions is that neither of my parents are fit to work and I cannot afford to have anybody take care of either of them. My dad was thankfully a hard working person during his "top of the line" days, and as such his social security and disability do pay for his rent and bills (he's a US Veteran as well, so he goes to a Veteran's hospital at a discounted rate.. though they'll only see him a couple times a year if he doesn't injure himself..) When I suggested that he, my mom, and my sisters rent a house (which would be cheaper than the separate apartments), he "Would not have it!" I don't know if it's because he divorced my mom or because he's obsessively OCD.

Yes.. Obsessively OCD. Before his condition, my youngest sisters were living in one of his spare rooms. If my father found one of their hairs on the floor, he would go ballistic. "YOU NEED TO CUT THEIR HAIR" he'd shout before proceeding to yelling a lecture at them. In the bathroom, if you used the sink, you HAD to dry up all of the water. If you didn't dry the water.. you better be prepared to die. During the course of a day, he would sweep, mop, and dust his apartment.. and go through your room and clean your closet of things he felt needed to go. It was a bit much, so my sisters moved out. Now with that coupled with his brain deteriorating.. it's just hard to be around him.

Oh.. and he'll still clean his apartment. Whether or not there are injuries during such a thing, I don't know. I often can't be around due to work and dealing with things on my own end, so I often just trust that he's alright until I see him again.

Other than that: My sister is legally blind in one eye, my other sister's best friend is partially deaf, a coworker of mine is absolutely deaf, and one of my best friends in high school slowly progressed from normal sight to red-green color blindness and was slowly losing the rest of his color recognition.

There are probably less interesting troubles such as my heart being smaller than it should be and my grandmother having diabetes, and there's plenty of mental disorders to go around.. But those are rather everyday and boring, I'd imagine.
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Posted 2/19/14
My oldest son was born with additional genetic material on the Y chromosome of the first chromosomal pair. That's its official name. The geneticist who diagnosed him (very early on as it was evident from birth there was a problem) said that most times when something like this happens, the fetus is aborted by the mother. The little bear didn't. He's now 25 and he has the mental and physical abilities of a 2 to 4 year, without the ability to form sentences or words. Other than that, he's happy most of the time and very affectionate with a teasing streak. He loves to pull himself up to his window, since he can't stand or walk and scream at the crows in the yard. They sometimes scream back. The hardest thing is knowing I'll outlive him and praying that I do, since he needs me to care for him. As I've explained to my nephews and nieces over the years, the little bear doesn't need pity or kid gloves, what he needs is affection, a little bit of rough-house playing, and the occasional butt-pinch to hear him giggle like a maniac. You give up a lot to make sure they stay alive as long as they can and as healthy as they can and as happy as they can be. You give up relationships that could have happened, but didn't. Job opportunities that never come around again. The change to move to a different place because their doctors and care providers who know him are where you live, and it's too scary and frightening to train new ones. But you do it. Each and every time because it means they have another day to wake up and laugh and hug and pinch and cry and you do that time again, each and every day, as that means the little bears get to have another day.
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24 / M / N, Ireland
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Posted 2/19/14 , edited 2/19/14
For me I have speech impediment and I have Autism.. but I rarely go into tantrums or stuff. Just tend to be quiet which as gotten me bullied. My Uncle's actually similar though I don't talk to him much.
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