First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
What does it mean to be an Otaku?
41659 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F / Southern Oregon
Offline
Posted 12/3/13

PKMNTrainerAndrew wrote:

I'm writing a speech for a public speaking class, and would like to hear from fellow members of this sub-culture on the subject. I.E. what does it mean to you, what does it involve, how are you perceived because of it, what do you like the most about it, etc. etc

I'm having difficulty writing it because it feels like some of the reasons I like what makes me an Otaku are rather abstract, and would be hard to explain to people who absolutely no idea what I'm talking about, and only have my words to guide them.


I don't think it would really be that hard for others to understand because everyone has something that they are really nerdy about. The only reason why people snicker at Star Trek fans and praise fashionistas is that one is more socially acceptable then the other. Every group had a range of types from the "casual" fans to the "hard core" fans to the "so far out there we don't even know what they are thinking" fans.

I think the only thing you have to do is talk about what anime and manga is and why you like it. You may also want to talk about how anime isn't a genre it's an art medium and how there is a range of different type of shows and movies for many age ranges (i.e., not all are either porn or children shows). In that you can mention how the misconception most have about anime and manga causes fans to be perceived negatively and how some (like myself) went/go to great lengths to hide it out of fear of being an outcast in school.

Personally the reason why I like anime (and feel free to use this if you like) is because it makes me think about things. The first show I really got into was Digimon and the reason was because it was the first time I had ever watched a "cartoon" kids show that talked issues children go through in a realistic non sugar coated way. It was the first time I had seen a show that looked at what it felt like for a child who was adopted to find out and come to terms with it; what it was like for an older brother, who was separated by devoice from his younger brother, try to figure out what it meant to be a brother again. I was completely blown away by it and thought how come American cartoons don't do this? I like that anime has more freedom to present issues with more maturity without resorting to being crud (like in America where "mature" always equals crud and gross when it comes to animation). I also like that different cultural views that come up when watching anime especially when it is very different or even controversial because it forces me look at my own views and opinions on the topic and think about them. It has helped me to be more tolerant and understanding of other people and has helped me to be a more well rounded person.

578 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Somewhere
Offline
Posted 12/3/13
For the intro, I would describe and define otaku as what it is considered to be: people obsessed with anime, manga, video games, etc.,
But then, go on to describe it in short with more depth. When you think about it now, an "otaku" is just the same as someone who is obsessed with something they like....such as Italian food.....or Basketball..... or porn.......I dunno.
Though make sure you clarify that, in this day and age, Otaku is most generally pertained to Japanese manga, anime, video games, etc.

Then maybe describe the history of the word. Where did "Otaku" come from? What is its origins? Original meaning?

AFterwards, different types of otaku, such as cosplaying types, video game types, etc.,

The feelings and opinions otakus have based on interviews, research or surveys......

The feelings society has on otakus based on interviews, research or surveys......

Then, (if you are American, or from a different country,) describe the impact Otaku culture has on your country/region.

Lastly, the finale. Summarizing the points you made, and maybe some speech on how no matter who you are, if you are passionate and obsessed with something, you probably have an otaku spirit in you.

....and, yeah. That's all I got. xD
7127 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
18 / M
Offline
Posted 12/3/13
Otaku is Otaku.

We are special geeks
66 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / Your wareness
Offline
Posted 12/4/13 , edited 12/4/13

PKMNTrainerAndrew wrote:

I'm writing a speech for a public speaking class, and would like to hear from fellow members of this sub-culture on the subject. I.E. what does it mean to you, what does it involve, how are you perceived because of it, what do you like the most about it, etc. etc

I'm having difficulty writing it because it feels like some of the reasons I like what makes me an Otaku are rather abstract, and would be hard to explain to people who absolutely no idea what I'm talking about, and only have my words to guide them.

I, personally, don't identify myself as an otaku. However, with its numerous applications, its a term that could certainly be applied to me.

Others have already noted most of the aspects of what it means to be an otaku, which generally depends on perspective and culture. In Japan, it's commonly used pejoratively, which might still be the case if it's used to mean "geek/nerd" in the general sense. It can also be used for specific interests and hobbies, if someone thinks (perhaps even the person in question) that enough of a person's time/effort/resources is devoted toward a certain something -- and it can get very specific, in that regard. In the United States, the term doesn't have the same baggage as it does in Japan, so its meaning is pretty simple and straightforward, mostly meaning that someone is enough of a fan of anime or manga in general.

Had I lived in Japan, "otaku" would certainly be used to describe me in a pejorative way. I'm a NEET, and a hikikomori, with my time spent doing little else that doesn't involve anime, manga or video games. In reality, I don't really know how I'm perceived because I don't come into contact with a lot of people in my environment, and because it's uncommon for me to communicate with them on top of that. I can imagine what others might think of me (had they been aware of me), but I -- ultimately -- don't care, which is why I don't perceive myself as an otaku. I just get whatever helps me to pass the time; I have no real passion for anything, really.
16119 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
15 / M
Offline
Posted 12/4/13

Aokidanza wrote:

A hearty obsession with Japanese animation. Like a film buff, but with anime. You know seiyuus like actors, treat classic shows like classic movies, are accustomed to certain troupes (some of which you love, and others you hate). You follow your favorite studios and directors. You fawn over certain characters and are emotionally invested in their story. You discuss theories with others, share your thoughts, engage in the fandom. You collect merchandise of your favorite series and pride yourself on your collection.

It's really no different from movie fans or TV fans. People think it's different because it's just "cartoons", but it really isn't.

My favorite part of anime fandom is talking with other fans. I especially love discussing theories on ongoing shows and guessing what's going to happen next. The suspense is the best part of weekly shows, anime or not!


I like your view on the fandom the best
14478 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
19 / M / Puerto Rico
Online
Posted 12/4/13

qualeshia3 wrote:

Otaku is a derogatory word though......in Japan.

Yet Otaku is just another word for "geek"(and/or "nerd")and the word Otaku isn't just for people that enjoy anime.
Anyone can be an Otaku and NOT enjoy anime.


Just my opinion.


It's funny because even though it's derogatory (and also can be used for train/plane otakus etc.) it has slowly been accepted as a term to define an identity, and I don't just mean in the West (that has been common for some time now). Japanese teens who have always lived in their homeland are increasingly using the term to refer to themselves and others that share the same interests, and an ex-Prime Minister from Japan once used the term on himself to express approval towards the interest of foreigners or something along those lines. Both articles are cited in the Wikipedia page for Otaku, numbers 17 and 18, but they're completely in Kanji so yeah :/

The one about the term gaining approval is very recent, just this year, so I think it's safe to assume that the western love for the term over the years has been noticed over there and influenced these changes.

However, at its core it is still derogatory. Also, while this may not be the best analogy, it is somewhat similar to the way the N word's image has evolved. For a long time it was purely derogatory, then those which the term was meant to represent caught wind of it and it became ok to call each other by that name since they shared the referenced trait in common. But if someone who doesn't share that attribute with you calls you with it, it is usually viewed as offensive (with the N word more than Otaku, but it's still considerably similar).
23467 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / F / New Jersey, USA
Offline
Posted 12/4/13




The way I see it the N word is just taking a bad thing, turning it around, and making "good" use of it. The word Otaku is derogatory but people who use it don't really care.

That is just what I think though.








First  Prev  1  2  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.