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What inspires fansub groups? what keeps them going?
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23 / M
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Posted 1/12/14
I mean, there not being paid, and subing a episode requires a lot of work! they have love for anime but also the knowledge of the Japanese language! now i am very grateful, but what ecaxatly is there motivation is puting in all the time and effort just to give other people subbed episodes?
Guardian of A/M/P
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Yo Mama's House
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Posted 1/12/14
Internet cookies.
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27 / F / Australia
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Posted 1/13/14 , edited 1/13/14
i guess its the fans and after awhile most of them (the good ones) put out Tshirts with their quotes so they do get money in the end
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Posted 1/13/14 , edited 1/13/14
Ego is what keeps them going. For the big ones anyway. Some of the smaller ones are doing it out of a genuine desire to provide translations for something that is otherwise not available (which the big ones invariably ignore because not enough people would download it for them to bother).
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M / Seattle
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Posted 1/13/14
Ad generated revenue. Donations. Sharpens skills for future opportunities. Internet glory.

Stuff like that.
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44 / M / Canada
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Posted 1/13/14
It depends on the 'fan' 'subbers'. Some just rip off the Crunchyroll subs, either by downloading the feed or by writing it down. They don't do any sort of Japanese language anything...

And it is not all 'free'. There are download places that have ads, those that 'premium' early access downloads, 'lifetime subscriptions'. Many of them don't do the actual subbing, they just get torrents off and make websites, put some ads in, profit! No effort! Same for manga, there are those which profit off the work of others, doing very little of their own. Just buy a book, take the binding off, pop it in a scanner, upload, take the money.

But there are folks that did things like sub all 4 episodes of Nekomonogatari Kuro over a year ago and Kokoro Connect Michi Random same thing. 4 episodes came out in one night and they weren't streamed anywhere with English subs so some people worked very hard to get them out quickly.

Why? First post? Wanna be a hero? They watch a lot of fansubs and want to 'give back' to that community?

I summarize and translate a few manga and novel chapters now and again. Why do I do it? People ask... I dunno. I only do it if the 'proper' baka-tsuki and scanlators are months or years behind and people really want to know how things go. And I need to stop offering to do it as it takes 5-10 times longer to translate than just to read and I would rather be reading...

Some might do it to practice for getting a real job. Funimation had a job out for translator/subbers recently and they wanted experience. Where can you get experience for this other than doing fansubs?
Posted 1/13/14
just an fyi. if any url shows up here that is not supposed to be here, it will be removed and endanger the entire thread.
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25 / M / This Dying World
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Posted 1/13/14
When anime y does not get subbed picking up he slack was probably the major factor.

So I guess that is what stuck with me in my earliest years.
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26
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Posted 1/13/14
If I remember correctly from long ago, it was unusual for even a forth of a season's anime to be released in English in some form (VHS or otherwise), and many anime shows on television (Dragon Ball, Sailor Moon, etc) could easily be several seasons behind on their broadcasts.

As a result, some fans felt they could generate talk and interest about an anime more so if they were to fansub them into VHS format. And if it were popular here, then it's possible that companies such as SciFi channel & ADV (later on) would take notice and choose to license the anime on VHS to the public (since there's a visible public interest in it.)

You could also think of it like mods for video games. One player that knows a little code might be upset that a game from a series they love was never released in English (like Valkyria Chronicles III) or they might be upset at the poor quality of a port and want to fix an already existing version of it via their own patch (like Dark Souls' buggy PC release.) Cases like this, but with anime domestication about 10-20 years ago sparked a fansubbing frenzy.

With the rise of DVDs and websites like amazon & ebay (I'm talking the early days of DVDs & amazon), it started becoming common practice for an anime to be pirated by Chinese groups and sold rather cheaply over the internet (even if the anime was never officially licensed. If any anime you own on DVD doesn't have the logo of a legit English licensing company on it or if it's old and has Chinese subtitles, I GUARANTEE that you own a pirate copy.) As a result, many would-be buyers of anime started to feel that they could simply get their anime cheaper from these groups and discontinued their services to official licensing companies.

At this time, there was also a sudden surge of fansubbing streams on the internet due to possible revenues attainable by such websites. It was also just as illegal as buying the rather cheap 1-2 disk seasons of an anime from a pirate company, so many simply didn't care. It was simply another source to acquire anime that would rarely be licensed into English anyway.

At around this time, websites like Crunchyroll began streaming fansubbed anime shows, etc.

However, licensing companies had gotten more efficient at acquiring anime licenses and releasing a larger quantity of them (usually a few seasons late). As a result, cease and desist orders and lawsuits started to become commonplace, since getting the streams removed before you start advertising a "new anime" to an English speaking public is far better than leaving them up and risking part of your revenue being lost to such websites.

As a result of these cases and the crackdown on streaming groups, Crunchyroll had decided to go the legal route with their streams (since streams could potentially make just as much as a DVD release, and the sooner you release them, the more viewers you would get and the more legal revenue you could acquire.)

As a response to this, companies such as FUNimation & Aniplex began using AnimeNetwork, hulu, and their own websites to attain revenue from streaming (and started releasing anime a lot quicker than they've ever released them before.)

As a result of all of these new (and legal!) stream, it's now HIGHLY UNUSUAL for popular anime to not receive licensing in English. Due to this, many of the fansubbing groups from the past simply cease to exist (since it'd be pointless for a fan to go through the effort to fully translate an anime episode-by-episode if it's already being done by a legitimate company, available early, and available in English to the general public.) It's still done by a few, but most groups have ceased functioning entirely.

However, as above posters have mentioned, streaming anime illegally can still provide illegal revenue. As such, subtitled works by FUNimation, crunchyroll, etc are sometimes illegally ripped and re-streamed on illegal streaming websites.

A website like Crunchyroll is really a 1990's fansubber's dream. Most of Japan's popular or unique anime are available within days of Japanese release, in English, and for free if you're willing to watch ads or cheaply if you want to watch quickly and ad-free.
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24 / M / CR Forums
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Posted 1/13/14

HauAreWe wrote:

.


Yeah, HauAreWe has an excellent post on this! Just read his over again.

It reminded me of that old gaming inustry related quote from Valve.

"Pirating is a service problem"

People created fansub's and bought Chinese boot-legs because they were unable to get it elsewhere. Consumers have proven that they're willing to pay any price to obtain something they want, so long as they're able to obtain it.

The fans will bring us Fansubs when the companies won't, and when the companies do they go away.
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35 / M / Canada
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Posted 1/13/14 , edited 1/13/14
Well, fansubbing goes back to the 80s and 90s before anime was even available here in original format. As such, people bought it, then smuggled into country, put the subs and rented the videos. Only way it was possible back in the start outside of Japan. Well, you could get the happy super edit for north america....

Since the advent of the digital media, fansubbing is pretty much not even fansubbing anymore outside of the old, odd or just eclectic. Any studio wanting to make some extra bucks can put in a translated digital sub for other languages then sell it through distributors. With fans expecting exact matches to the show, there really is less editing work. It is easier than dubs since don't need to speech match.

The fansub posts on youtube and torrents, and manga translations. 95% of it (especially shows and mangas already being international) is nothing more than piracy in my books. I give exception to anything that simply is not able to be purchased anymore or isnt translated. Drove under Tokyopop and many others once downloading and freehosting sites became "the norm". Only hurts the industry and people's livelihoods.


HauAreWe wrote:



ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS WRITEUP ^.^
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35 / M / Tucson, AZ
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Posted 1/13/14 , edited 1/13/14
It's difficult for some of you young folks to realize how much of a godsend fansubbers were back in the day. In the 90's I use to tape trade everything and anything I could get my hands on. There use to be a comic book store that sold a lot of these fansubs across the street from Florida International University in my hometown of Miami. Man those were the days, we are all spoiled now. I use to think I was so cool because I saw all the anime we never got in the states and that I knew what was going to happen on Dragon Ball Z before new episodes came out.
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24 / M / The Dark Continent
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Posted 1/13/14
I've often wondered about this too...
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Posted 1/13/14
In the end they're more than likely either trying to become big enough to ads and stuff in theirs, so they can make some money. The other option is that someone has some spare time and views it as a hobby. Right now, I'm trying to teach myself japanese, so i might go in and try to do a couple myself just because it would be great practice and provide services otherwise not there.
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19 / M / Watching CR
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Posted 1/13/14
For the people who dont give a dam about where or how they watch anime. There are a lot of people who watch fansubs due to the fact that they are free and widely available. Cheap people would rather watch with fansubs then wait a week for Crunchyroll with low quality.
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