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Miyazaki: The Problem With The Anime Industry Is It's Full of Otaku
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Posted 1/30/14 , edited 12/28/14
Are we misinterpreting the word Otaku strictly for an anime fan?

Anyone with an unhealthy obsession over something is an Otaku. Of course the word is viewed as derogatory.
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Posted 1/30/14
guess it depends on what your going for or who you are aiming at if you want to reach anime fans than having the creators be anime fans aswell is good but if you are trying to bring people who might not care much for anime you may not want complete anime trope everywhere (this goes for any industry really)
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I don't really think the anime industry is run by otaku. it's run by businessmen who put any popular concept through the wringer so they can milk as much money out of it as possible. Miyazaki is way off the mark on this one.
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Posted 1/30/14
I remember when I was young I thought everyone in Japan loved anime. Then I actually started talking to Japanese people on the internet and all of them pretty much hate anime.
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Posted 1/30/14

qualeshia3 wrote:

Are we misinterpreting the word Otaku strictly for an anime fan?

Anyone with an unhealthy obsession over something is an Otaku. Of course the word is viewed as derogatory.


Otaku in Japan is like Trekkie or Furry here. it implies a degree of fandom that is to the point of social deviance. (a sociological term)

Otaku is just more generic. you can have miltary otaku (like Sio Ogura in Nobunagun, JASDF Otaku like the guys camped outside the base in TTS 801 'Airbats', and anime Otaku)

In western parlance it's acquired a certain cachet as 'ultimate, or Master (as in apprentice/journeyman/master) anime fan. I've actually seen someone type "If you don't know what a cabbit is, then you can't call yourself an anime fan, let alone an Otaku" ... Implying that someone would WANT to self identify as an Otaku.


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Posted 1/30/14

papagolfwhiskey wrote:


qualeshia3 wrote:

Are we misinterpreting the word Otaku strictly for an anime fan?

Anyone with an unhealthy obsession over something is an Otaku. Of course the word is viewed as derogatory.


Otaku in Japan is like Trekkie or Furry here. it implies a degree of fandom that is to the point of social deviance. (a sociological term)

Otaku is just more generic. you can have miltary otaku (like Sio Ogura in Nobunagun, JASDF Otaku like the guys camped outside the base in TTS 801 'Airbats', and anime Otaku)

In western parlance it's acquired a certain cachet as 'ultimate, or Master (as in apprentice/journeyman/master) anime fan. I've actually seen someone type "If you don't know what a cabbit is, then you can't call yourself an anime fan, let alone an Otaku" ... Implying that someone would WANT to self identify as an Otaku.





True indeed.
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Posted 1/30/14
Similarly. "Ronin" in Japanese translates as 'vagabond' and has a connotative meaning of 'LOSER' (with a capital L)

a More literal translation is 'Failed Samurai' emphasis on 'failed'. A Ronin is a masterless samurai, And masters are appointed for life.

In the west again, Ronin (thanks to some 80's/90's marvel comics) has this Eastwood-esque 'man with no name' cachet and again acquires a 'cool factor' it lacks in it's place of origin.
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Posted 1/30/14
I can honestly care less what the old hippie of anime thinks
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Posted 1/30/14

uncletim wrote:

I can honestly care less what the old hippie of anime thinks


Just because you dissmiss him doesn't mean there is no truth to his statement. It's easy to dismiss or discredit people because there's something about them you don't like. Labels weather they be hippie, or neocon, or redneck do not promote understanding.


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Posted 1/30/14 , edited 1/30/14

papagolfwhiskey wrote:


uncletim wrote:

I can honestly care less what the old hippie of anime thinks


Just because you dissmiss him doesn't mean there is no truth to his statement. It's easy to dismiss or discredit people because there's something about them you don't like. Labels weather they be hippie, or neocon, or redneck do not promote understanding.




You mean like how he dismisses people by calling them Otaku? If anything he should be very greatful those people who he dismissed as subpar somehow made him very rich

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Posted 1/30/14

uncletim wrote:


papagolfwhiskey wrote:


uncletim wrote:

I can honestly care less what the old hippie of anime thinks


Just because you dissmiss him doesn't mean there is no truth to his statement. It's easy to dismiss or discredit people because there's something about them you don't like. Labels weather they be hippie, or neocon, or redneck do not promote understanding.




You mean like how he dismisses people by calling them Otaku? If anything he should be very greatful those people who he dismissed as subpar somehow made him very rich



Exactly like that. his unfortunately choice of terminology doesn't change the probable reality. I've seen it too often in education. Peope got to high school and then university and the straight into teaching where they control their own little worlds, and where like post grads and professors MANY (not all of course) never leave the shelter of academia.

Their ability to meaningfully teach some folk is crippled by the fact that all they know is 'the book'

Likewise will a person who did nothing but sketch first his comic book heroes then his own comic book heroes and tell his own comic book stories to himself until he breaks into the western comic book industry have the same richness of story telling as someone who say... was a war vet in between creative endeavors? Possibly. But my money's on the person who's been places and seen things.

One of the best sci fi, 'war' authors I know has 'seen the elephant' and it shows in his writing. I don't think it's impossible to write good war novels if you're not a Vet. CJ Cherryh is considered a good writer of those type of tales and when she was of of enlistment age the military was still very much 'No GURLS ALLWD" . I still think David Drake could not have Written Hammer's Slammers without having ridden with the BlackHorse.

If that's what Miyasaki is trying to say. I think there's some truth to it. If he's just bitching that the current gen grew up in love with HIS stuff then he's being a dink.

Your mileage may vary




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Posted 1/30/14
All i know is the anime industry is run by business individuals who know how to market their goods to die-hard fans of their products. This is especially the case since i just ordered goods off of AmiAmi. Yikes. This may be a crude but fitting term, but these guys are "pimps".
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The same could be said of most creative fields out there. The people involved in the field have to be engrossed in it to make a proper living, and most of the market trends rely off of profiting on something popular or maintaining a very distinct style between your past work and current work.

If a director of movies wants to make a movie, they have to have studied them prior. Often, their movie will be similar to popular movies or movie styles that the director liked (because they're trying to make something other people will like) and the results are mostly dependent on marketing or positive word of mouth. If the movie is well-marketed, the piece doesn't have glaring flaws, and it reminds people of other movies they like, it will have positive word of mouth and become successful.

If the director is instead a fellow that's hardly seen any movies in his life and tries to throw something together based on the little knowledge they have of what works, the results are often devastatingly bad and never reach the point where they hit the market. There are flukes here and there, but this is what happens. If the person planning to market your work doesn't feel that it is familiar and isn't sure if they can market it, the results are often bad.

Yes, you must be obsessed with certain subject matter to make it a worthwhile career. And yes, as far as entertainment goes, it relies more on marketing and familiarity than absolute originality. That's why we have genres. Usually it takes several minor successes before a new niche is properly established, but once it is, its success is usually copied. It makes sense. If every person that has ever made a film had to re-invented the wheel, the results would be very hit or miss (which is very bad considering the price point on marketing them and the rather heavy amount of competition that exists compared to the years when Miyazaki first entered the market and established his style.)

This isn't something new. Lewis Caroll (pen name) had stated during his lifetime that after Alice in Wonderland's sequel Through the Looking Glass was made, there were a great number of authors making books similar to his in the hope of copying his success due to the excessive amount of competition at the time. So many, in fact, that he felt he'd have to make something wildly different than his previous work. The result was the confusing and not nearly as interesting book Silvie and Bruno. How many people have heard of both Alice in Wonderland and Silvie and Bruno? very very few.

Let's say Miyazaki himself decided to completely drop his style of film that's largely representative of the Silver Age of Disney, and create a movie under a different studio and a false name (without people finding out.) Chances are that its success would be nothing like what he has been used to. The market has been already been trying to find out "who or what studio will be the next Miyazaki." Makoto Shinkai (whose favorite film is Miyazaki's Castle in the Sky) has already started to fill this role.

The same works for Miyazaki. If Miyazaki hadn't released his first Ghibli films in a style reminiscent of Disney and other western animated film studios during a time when Disney its-self was seeing a short resurgence in the market, its current success would be, at best, part of a niche market.
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Posted 1/30/14
I think he has a good point, but phrased it poorly.

One of the best things about animation is that it can do anything the authors want it to do.

TL:DR :
need more plot and different stuff with the all the plot going around.
I want to watch something memorable.
Spice up the settings, place it in Tahiti.
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Posted 1/30/14

vangosroth wrote:



What about teen romance novels? High Fantasy novels? Are these dime-a-dozen books any worse because their are hundreds of them?

Look at movies! Big Budget blockbusters, animated Disney Princesses, our yearly Action/Comedy/Romance/Teen/Horror movies?

The problem with Anime doesn't lie in the content, but the money.

It costs more money to make an Anime than it it would a Movie. It takes far more time to make an Anime than a movie. It's also not spread as far and wide as movies generally are. The market for the Anime might be there, but the distribution isn't always there.

Because of sites like Hulu, Netflix, and Crunchyroll. Anime has a far larger market. They can now make the series, and they're obtaining revenue not only from the T.V. broadcast, but from all the legal streaming sites they've made a deal with. Additionally, when the DVD"s do get released, you'll have an entire world market to sell them to.

Companies like Production I.G., Sunrise, and KyoAni are making bank off their generic high-quality titles. They make good shows that appeal to a wide audience, and are able to reap the rewards. Sunrise still makes a Gundam-clone Mecha every season. Code Geass/Valrave/Buddy Complex. They also keep making Gundams and Gunpla is making mountains of cash.
KyoAni says "you want Moe? WE'LL GIVE YOU ALL THE MOE" and is delivering A+ grade Moe that the more generic and weak shows can't.

Then you have the newbies like Trigger, who're resorting to online streaming services and Youtube to get money. Do you know how many places are streaming Kill la Kill? It's everywhere! Getting a legal stream of Kill la Kill is available around the world, none of that "I live in the UK and it doesn't stream here" nonsense! They're Otaku, they're charging about $80 for their 13-episodes of content, but they got to make money!
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