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Anyone thinks university is over-rated for getting a job? I think it is highly over-rated
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27 / M / Waterloo, Ontario
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Posted 1/31/14 , edited 9/12/14
This thread is primarily for people in high school who don't know what to do after graduating. Protip. You don't need to go to university for a successful career. There are other options, like community college and apprenticeship.

A high school diploma is enough for many jobs. Or you can get a 2 year degree from a community college for vocational training. I've been watching a lot of Youtube videos lately, and I think university is a waste of money and time for most people. If you want to acquire knowledge, just use the internet and the library, which are far cheaper.

University is way too expensive in the USA and Canada, and there are other alternatives for higher education. For example, you go to community college to learn a hands-on skill, like policing or nursing, which is typically much cheaper than a 4 year university degree. Or you can become an apprentice and learn hands-on skills from work experience. Become a plumber or car mechanic or something like that. Those jobs pay fairly well and you can earn a sufficient income for a fairly good living off those jobs.

Unless you are majoring in something that can land you a good-paying job, going to university is a waste of money and time. If you want to major in Electrical Engineering or Nuclear Physics, go ahead and rack up some debt. That's because the job you will end up having ACTUALLY requires an university degree. And the income you receive actually allows you to eventually pay off your tuition loans.

However, it is not worth going into five or even six-figure student debt for a degree that is not going to land you a high-paying job. So I would think twice before going into a huge amount of debt for a degree, like English or Sociology, which will land you in a job that you could have gotten with just a high school diploma. I've been watching some Youtube videos of people, who have racked up tens and even hundreds of thousands of dollars of debt studying something like Sociology or English. And then they end up either jobless or doing a minimal-wage job that even a high-school student could do.

Do you really think it is a good idea racking up tens of thousands dollars in debt majoring in something that will land you with a minimum-wage job? If you have a minimum-wage job after graduating and tens of thousands dollars in debt, you will be burdened by not only low-income and poverty but a huge debt you will never be able to pay off. So you will end up being a debt slave for the rest of your life. You can't declare bankruptcy because you must pay off your student loans the moment you graduate.

I'm posting this thread because I want to warn people to not fall into the college debt trap. Don't burrow tens of thousands of dollars in student loans to go to university and then end-up with a minimum-wage job, being unable to pay off your debt. Get a high school diploma and then either go to a community college or vocational training. Community colleges offer plenty of good programs for jobs that are in-demand, like nursing, policing or cooking. Or you could get an apprenticeship in a job like wielding, auto-repair, hair-dressing and plumbing. Do your research, and consider alternative post-secondary educational routes, before choosing the 4 year university route.

Ultimately, the whole point of this thread is that you don't need to get a four-year university degree to be successful in life. In fact, you are probably better off without one, because becoming an impoverished debt-slave is not worth it.

In this thread, we can discuss the career paths you can take, after you are finished high school. Remember a 4 year university degree isn't the only option.
Posted 1/31/14
tl;dr
College/ uni are necessary for certain jobs but it's not needed to get money.
If supply and demand applies to the work force then it's possible this has spawned an idiot epidemic where replenishing old stock with more of the same is more in demand than innovation.
at the moment most of the products in my country are imported and the money is in the retail and not manufacturing this means it's become a consumerist / throw away society.
Here is an example of what I mean:

This painting is now 50 years old


Right now there's an idiot proof policy on the developed world so anyone can use their equipment, drive a car, answer a telephone.
The key to living successfully is to be "of the majority." especially in a democracy.
So if you work in retail for minimum wage, are married with at least one child, rent your house watch more sport than is healthy and drug yourself into a stupor at least once a week then you are living as well as you can expect to.
Posted 1/31/14
If you like debt slavery, then yes. Else you've obtained a scholarship or some way to completely pay off the dues.
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21 / F / Australia
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Posted 1/31/14
I live in Australia. I finished my High School studies in 2013, finishing my exams in December. University applications in my state (South Australia) provide us with a choice of a maximum of 6 preferences in total (across all courses and Universities, in SA there are 3 mainly known Uni's and probably a few others that aren't so well known) and the deadline was due in November, so prior to actually finishing our High School studies - the pressure of University applications and exams were pretty extreme.

We received our offers from the Universities just a few weeks ago. I received an offer in Psychology however I felt disappointed. I love Psychology and I love neurobiology so I was fascinated by all aspects of Psychology. I've known for a long time that I don't want to make a job out of it though. Firstly, I believe that the Psychology courses out there are overrated courses that people who have no clue what they want to do just enter into because they think it'll be easy or they'll be able to easily get a job (I disagree with both prospects as well as doubt the happiness that a job in that profession would offer to an individual contemplating long term employment).

I've always been writing and reading, essentially all my (capable) life. It's what I enjoy and apparently I have the power to move people and as long as people take away from what they've read, that I was meaning to put into my writing then that is more than enough for me. Obviously creative writing isn't a stable job hence why I decided to not pursue a creative writing course in University. Instead, I'm going for a Bachelor of Media meaning I can major in Journalism and another creative yet modern subject such as Graphic design or Advertising - jobs that are by no means out-dated but indeed growing with the growth of technology use.

I will take that course, which is only 3 years as opposed to typical 4 year courses and continue creative writing on the side in order to see if it takes me anywhere.

My mum was by no means insistent on me going to University. However, she insists that the experience you gain at University is unlike any other, particularly in your educational experiences, and that it is worth attending simply for that - even if you aren't planning to use your qualifications to aid your future. That is coming from someone who attended University TWICE. My family (parents, brother and I) left Europe to come to Australia post-war (I was quite a bit younger) and at the time their University qualifications from our home country was not applicable, therefore they had to repeat their degrees whilst learning English at the same time - they had 0 knowledge about English and indeed learned it from scratch but with hard work they managed to continue their English studies, University studies and work part time to take care of two young children after moving to a completely foreign country with no money except for what the government supplied. Although I don't live with both of them, they both have good-high paying jobs - my dad completed Civil Engineering and works as a Draftsman and my mum is a scientist.

Regardless of this, my mum still recommends the experience. She believes it is invaluable and you meet people that you will remember for life at University too. I have no idea what my future holds. I have no idea if my creative writing will take me off on a completely different path and on a different journey or if my University qualification will enable me to become employed in certain Media-related fields that I enjoy. I have no clue at all. All I know is I look forward to University.

Annual tuition fees for my course is $6,100, equating to a total of $18,300 for my full 3 years. It is indeed a bit of money but of course not the most expensive that a course can attract. The Australian government offers fee assistance and there are other forms of Financial Assistance available. I'm taking a gap year (a year off after secondary education completion), so rather than entering straight into my tertiary education, I've deferred my course till 2015 so that I can take this year off to work and accumulate savings. It is also possible to complete courses part-time as opposed to full-time, meaning you can work and study at the same time making dealing with fees and such a bit easier.

However, what my mum said does not just apply to those fresh out of secondary education, entering tertiary education. It can apply to middle age individuals who already have stable jobs, even older people, anyone. Her point is the experience, it does not necessarily mean you have to experience it as soon as you complete secondary education.

I don't believe everyone is fit for Vocational Training and otherwise. Some people may be, no doubt, but others are not. Hence it is necessary for them to obtain University qualifications in order to get employed in their area of interest. However, this thread is an interesting way to raise awareness for those who believe that University is the be all and end all and, for those who intend to attend University, it is also raising awareness of the fees. If someone is dead-set on a University course, there is no harm in taking a few years off in order to earn money and prepare for the fees that accompany University if that is what you really want to do. There is no rush to complete your University degree(s) because you want to finish when other people your age finish or around the same time as others, that is simply irresponsible and essentially an immature mindset to adhere to.

This was extremely long. TL;DR Do whatever the hell you want with your life however don't just dive in the deep end without dipping your toe in the water first. It would be horrible to complete your ideal degree and be burdened by the weight of debt. Plan ahead.
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24 / M / Kaguya's Panties
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Posted 1/31/14
Yes, over rated.
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50 / F / Toronto
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Posted 1/31/14 , edited 1/31/14
SO overrated in Canada that all our tradespeople are over retirement age.

university has it's uses. But if you're going there only because someoneELSE thinks you're "smart enough to do better than the trades" Take a good hard look at reality first.


That said there's more reasons to go to university than to get a job. While it's true there are sheltered nobs out there who've never left academia for the real world. The engineering student motto that "Friends don't let Friends take arts" is also a dangerous mind set. For one thing it's a mindset that Albert Speer (in his probably exculpatory book) made things easier for the Nazi's to take power in Germany.

Just... know what you're trying to get from your university experience and try to balance your perception of the gains vs. the cost.
Posted 1/31/14
What I've learnt in the real world is that you don't need a university degree to get a good job; what you need are good connections and charisma.
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26 / M / UK
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Posted 1/31/14 , edited 1/31/14
"Over-rated" implies there's some massive fanbase for University and they're telling everyone that it's the best place to go . Usually they mean it and will insist upon it over other forms of education. I don't know a single person who acts like this towards it and even teachers/careers advice these days are willing to talk about vocational colleges and apprenticeships. Some even talk about self-employment, if the kid's wise enough.

So no, I don't think University is over-rated. I do, however, think that it still holds an unrealistic pedestal in the minds of many. It's not the be-all and end-all of intelligence and achievement. You should only to go to Uni if your current main interest lies in somewhere academic or scientific - history, sciences or medicine, mainly. If you have any interest in manual trades, you need to go to vocational college. If your interests are arts based - literature (not as a study), music, photography - then you should consider just starting to work on it and going for menial jobs in the meantime.

If you're going to work in the arts, the sooner you get work experience, the better. It will usually teach you valuable skills like how to market yourself to other people and how to nurture relations with people you don't necessarily give two shits about. You may also bump itno someone who can help you really get started in your career path.
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25 / M / Inside Lorreen's...
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Posted 1/31/14
There are some things that obviously require you to get a 4+ year degree that more or less force you into University if that is your goal, Engineers and Programmers are good evidence of this, and these are two highly sought after fields of study. But for the majority, I think I read somewhere last year something like 65% or something like that of the US jobs, they only require a high school diploma or 2 year (community college) degree.

So for quite a bit of jobs out there, plenty of which can easily support someone living on their own, the most you really need is a 2 year degree. But if you want a better job obviously, and are going for a particular degree that needs it, you will have to go to University.
Posted 1/31/14

GayAsianBoy wrote:

What I've learnt in the real world is that you don't need a university degree to get a good job; what you need are good connections and charisma.


Definitely, most companies will even pay for your University etc...
Posted 1/31/14

Sornette wrote:


GayAsianBoy wrote:

What I've learnt in the real world is that you don't need a university degree to get a good job; what you need are good connections and charisma.


Definitely, most companies will even pay for your University etc...


the australian defence force would definitely pay for your tuition fee and pay an income on top of that. especially if you've served for some time and then want to do mechanical engineering or some other sh*t that they need.
Posted 1/31/14 , edited 1/31/14

GayAsianBoy wrote:


Sornette wrote:


GayAsianBoy wrote:

What I've learnt in the real world is that you don't need a university degree to get a good job; what you need are good connections and charisma.


Definitely, most companies will even pay for your University etc...


the australian defence force would definitely pay for your tuition fee and pay an income on top of that. especially if you've served for some time and then want to do mechanical engineering or some other sh*t that they need.


I didn't know that but I'm talking about the Finance, Accountancy sector, the oil and gas sector, biomedical scientists etc... in the UK all put your experience above your degree and will invest in your future by giving you the opportunity to get that degree if you are missing one, basically fill any blanks.
Posted 1/31/14

Sornette wrote:
I didn't know that but I'm talking about the Finance, Accountancy sector, the oil and gas sector, biomedical scientists etc... in the UK all put your experience above your degree and will invest in your future by giving you the opportunity to get that degree if you are missing one, basically fill any blanks.


I agree.

Once you get your foot in the door, you can only go up from there. (Unless you butthead your boss like Mutta from space brothers)
Posted 1/31/14

GayAsianBoy wrote:


Sornette wrote:
I didn't know that but I'm talking about the Finance, Accountancy sector, the oil and gas sector, biomedical scientists etc... in the UK all put your experience above your degree and will invest in your future by giving you the opportunity to get that degree if you are missing one, basically fill any blanks.


I agree.

Once you get your foot in the door, you can only go up from there. (Unless you butthead your boss like Mutta from space brothers)


Ah! I'd have to add Law too. Depends on like you said, connections. Some schools are brilliant at attracting local companies to come over and appeal to high school kids, like a couple of law firms went to my little sister's school telling the kids to come work for them and promising to pay for their higher education. It's too bad my sister is determined to become a dentist so for someone like her, University is necessary.
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21 / M / Here
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Posted 1/31/14 , edited 3/12/14
Over here in the UK, there aren't any jobs anyway. You hear of plenty of people getting A's and A*s in Uni, but they still can't get a job. It's also possible to be overqualified. Besides, grades alone aren't enough anyway. There's way more to coming across as a good candidate than having good grades. I can see how achieving highly in University is neccessary for a high tier job, but if you don't want that then it's absolutely pointless. Luckily enough, my dad has his own business and will accept me anytime, so failing everything else I've always got that.
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