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Post Reply When it comes to writing stories, do you sweat the small stuff instead of writing?
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 2/4/14 , edited 2/4/14
Let me know if a thread like this one exist or not.
Thanks a bunches.


I find myself worrying about making grammar mistakes(I HATE IT!) and showing rather than telling. I write the story then get annoyed by my work once I read it over. Got any advice for me.

Explain your answer in great detail.
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Posted 2/4/14

qualeshia3 wrote:

Let me know if a thread like this one exist or not.
Thanks a bunches.


I find myself worrying about making grammar mistakes(I HATE IT!) and showing rather than telling. I write the story then get annoyed by my work once I read it over. Got any advice for me.

Explain your answer in great detail.


Well I don't really worry about grammar or handwriting. ( I hand write my school stories before typing them) My main focus on my story is originality and how long its got to be because my teacher likes out creative handing writing homework. Then I also worry about showing another side of my personality when I write stories for my class because no matter how long the story he makes us present them. My advice is if your going big really its not a problem, but if you feel like poking and proding every thing then that's just the way you were made. ( Really the thing that matters most in a story is the story element if you got a great story with a few mistakes here and there then no one will pay attention to the mistakes.
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Posted 2/4/14



Thank you. I never really liked writing stories by hand due to having more thought on my laptop. I type better than I write anyways. The only time I'l write by hand is just to jot some notes.
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26 / M / Mission Ctrl
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Posted 2/4/14
Do you write on digital or traditional media? I ask because, obviously plain paper won't judge your grammar. While most digital apps will red-mark even the tiniest imperfections, like the jerk that they are. I have no point to make there, it's merely a subjective view I have.

Personally, I find imperfections show character, so no, I do not 'sweat the small stuff'.

If you're writing something to be shared (short story/ poem/ etc) Then draft it first. It could be just scribbles and foot-notes in it's infancy. That's why it's called a rough draft. Don't spend all that time focusing on minuet detail in the beginning. If it's something you're really proud of, [so long as it isn't pony fan-fic. The internet has well enough of that.] go ahead with the tedium. Ultimately, who cares what other people think, a good majority of the online under-verse can't spell their name, much less be a judge of literary work of any caliber.
~Just my thoughts.
Posted 2/4/14
I always tell instead of show.

I don't quite understand what "showing" is.

It's easy for me to say "She was angry" but you know.. how can you show anger? So that the reader will KNOW it's anger? >.> Or.. he was jealous. How will that be?
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Posted 2/4/14



Instead of simply telling the readers "she is angry", you should have the get an idea and see exactly how angry she is. I always figured it's best to show the readers what is happening in the story as a way of sucking them into it. I felt a descriptive and enjoyable was best for me.

That's what I struggle with.
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Posted 2/4/14

Skreig wrote:

Do you write on digital or traditional media? I ask because, obviously plain paper won't judge your grammar. While most digital apps will red-mark even the tiniest imperfections, like the jerk that they are. I have no point to make there, it's merely a subjective view I have.

Personally, I find imperfections show character, so no, I do not 'sweat the small stuff'.

If you're writing something to be shared (short story/ poem/ etc) Then draft it first. It could be just scribbles and foot-notes in it's infancy. That's why it's called a rough draft. Don't spend all that time focusing on minuet detail in the beginning. If it's something you're really proud of, [so long as it isn't pony fan-fic. The internet has well enough of that.] go ahead with the tedium. Ultimately, who cares what other people think, a good majority of the online under-verse can't spell their name, much less be a judge of literary work of any caliber.
~Just my thoughts.



I use digital media. The only time I'l hand write something pertaining to my stories is when I jot down notes.
Posted 2/4/14

qualeshia3 wrote:




Instead of simply telling the readers "she is angry", you should have the get an idea and see exactly how angry she is. I always figured it's best to show the readers what is happening in the story as a way of sucking them into it. I felt a descriptive and enjoyable was best for me.

That's what I struggle with.


XD Hahaha! I think the idea 'state the obvious' would be good in writing too!

Hmm... Thanks.

For telling... In writing, showing is what the teachers love. If you tell people what is going on, there isn't much going on for you x.x
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 2/4/14



You're welcome.

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Posted 2/5/14
i often spend jut as much time proofreading as i do writing. i often have to better organize my ideas once i type the first draft.
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25 / M / 'murica
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Posted 2/5/14
"Write drunk, edit sober."
Don't take it literally, but think of it more as write crazily. Get it all out.
Worry about showing and telling and spelling and a coherent story during the edit.
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Posted 2/5/14

chaoseye wrote:

"Write drunk, edit sober."
Don't take it literally, but think of it more as write crazily. Get it all out.
Worry about showing and telling and spelling and a coherent story during the edit.



Okay then.
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26 / M
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Posted 2/6/14
What exactly are we considering the "small stuff"? Writing is in its entirety (in my anxiety-riddled opinion) the "small stuff" if you are defining it as grammar, syntax, and the like.

With that said, these elements don't necessarily have to be used according to the rules of any textbook, unless you want the narration, characters, etc. to sound like they belong to said textbook. As for grammar, write how you want it to sound; semi-colon to your heart's content to rush a reader's/speaker's pace and develop a sense of breathlessness. I believe I've read a Hemingway short story (I think it was him -- I can't quite remember what it was, I want to say "Hills Like White Elephants," but that's irrelevant) in which one sentence was about a page long, so even the most prestigious authors take their own liberties with the ill-derived laws of legibility (though that passage was incredibly dense and such practices are likely more taxing to read than write). The same goes for spelling/word-usage. Unless the narration is wholly unbiased and a voice of irrefutably supreme intelligence, there is little reason to write perfectly/mechanically. There's a reason that the dictionary has to be revised every year; language is fluid -- shape it to your desires. Take for example my earlier use of "semi-colon" as a verb (yes, that was intentional); it was likely understood what I meant in the context, yet its use was technically improper. I think doing something of the sort can be an effective tool when dealing with that whole showing/telling dilemma; turn images themselves into verbs (e.g. instead of "A drop of blood condensed and hung, ready to fall," try "The blood began to stalactite."). It efficiently directs the reader towards an image that they may already have established in their head so that you don't have to work in excess to generate it. As much as you may want to force incredibly specific images into the reader's mind, their thought processes and experiences will inevitably distort the depictions you desire, so reference points may allow the shared experience of text to carry its variable experiences as well (if that makes any sense). Incredibly small elements of writing and language can easily be seen as absurdly contradictory tricks of grandiosity (i.e. artistic license, the reappropriation of words, excessive intrusions via parentheticals [my favorite!])...

...So, in a word, yes, I most certainly do sweat the "small stuff."
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23 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 2/6/14



I mainly dwell on grammar and trying to show what goes on in the story rather than telling it. People say "don't worry about the grammar so much" still it doesn't feel right to me. Can I really not have both perfect grammar in a story that isn't textbook boring?
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M / A Library!
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Posted 2/6/14
When typing, I always worry about grammar because It's better to know and not do it again than to not know and do it all the time. Secondly, I think its best to practice showing rather than telling by doing exactly that, i used to take time everyday to describe, explain, and work on getting a general image of what i was writing. Then, I would leave where ever i wrote about, and have someone else read it (now that i think about it, i sound kind of crazy).
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