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When it comes to writing stories, do you sweat the small stuff instead of writing?
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F / Edo Era
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Posted 3/16/14
I used to sweat a lot of small stuff but then I reminded myself that no matter how much i worry i have to finish.determination is the best thing to practice because giving up is too easy and i know many writers dont take the easy way out.
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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 3/16/14

qualeshia3 wrote:



I get the feeling I tell too much rather than show and the characters aren't even fictionally human enough to appeal to the readers. Grammar, punctuation, syntax, vocabulary, and etc are always on my mind. When I think about the story, I can see it like watching a movie yet when I write it feels different. The same happens when I read a fiction novel. I CAN NOT visualize what happens in the story my mine is always focused on something else. If there is a fight scene going on in chapter 5 of a story, the only thing I can do is read it instead of reading and visualizing together. It's so annoying and it been that way since I was young. I have ADHD/bipolar which causes problems for me when it comes to reading. I get the feeling it affects my writing too.

I haven't been able to enjoy reading and writing creatively since it doesn't feel real anymore. I write yet it doesn't feel the same. I lost all motivation and dedication for it.




Oh, so you're a technical(ly oriented) writer then.

You have most of the classic symptoms of just missing some of the nuts and bolts, ie practice. If you make a character too much like a regular person, you'll need some twists or they'll be boring. If you make them too outstanding, they need some flaws or they'll be unbelievable. Same goes for dialogue, actually.

Are you using any sort of outline? A full outline is actually not recommended for fiction, because it creates boredom. You simply wind up mundanely carrying out whatever was in the outline, there's no surprise. You might try, however, cobbling together bits and pieces. Character profiles. Settings. Events. Plotlines. Work on them separately and see if it makes a difference. Especially if you haven't tried any sort of structure at all.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/16/14




I sometimes use an outline only because I need to set things out. A technically oriented writer?
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36 / M / Denver
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Posted 3/17/14
Some writers are great at ideas, not so much at execution. Some writers are great at execution, not so much at ideas. Other comparisons could be made. It also makes writers gravitate towards one genre or type of publication over another.

It took J.R.R. Tolkien over 12 years to write Lord of the Rings. Bits and pieces he wrote in the trenches in World War 1, among many other life events. So don't be afraid to write little nuggets at a time and piece them together that way.
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27 / F
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Posted 3/17/14 , edited 3/17/14
I think the most important thing is to be kind to yourself, because writing is actually hard for everyone. It is harder for some people than for other people, but it is mostly just hard.

Here is some of my process, anyway. Typically, I write a pretty clean rough draft. I don't tend to make a lot of grammar errors, and I prefer to avoid them even very early on. I don't think this stifles my creativity. If I do feel like I am listening to my inner critic too much, I imagine sealing it up in a jar and then I carry on. For more stylistic things, I write in more detail for parts I am more interested in, and I write very little for the parts I don't have a feel for yet. I know that in subsequent drafts, the parts I write a bit sketchily will become more interesting to me, and I can fill them out once I have the whole frame of the story built. So I might say, 'She felt angry,' in the first draft and 'Her hands trembled and her voice became thin and sharp,' in a later draft once I have the whole thing laid out. Dialogue is the only thing I write with a final draft feel the first time around. Before I write it down I practice it in front of the mirror to make sure it not only sounds like the character, but also sounds like something someone would say.

Lastly, remember that you get to direct your reader's attention. If you get to fancy or stylish with your language you run the risk of distracting the reader from the story. Sometimes you want to tell, because you have something more important to show. I know when I am reading something truly great when I cannot figure out what makes it great, because reading it is as natural as breathing.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/21/14



Over 12 years?
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/21/14


I've noticed I'm too hard on myself far as writing stories. Its just haven't been so easy for me as it use to be years ago. I don't write a rough draft on paper due to doing it better on a computer. If I do write on paper when it pertains to writing my stories, it's to only write down notes. Not only is that the problem, I can't stick to one plot at a time which is sort of confusing and annoys me. I don't like complaining so I'll just end here.
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27 / F
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Posted 3/21/14

qualeshia3 wrote:



I've noticed I'm too hard on myself far as writing stories. Its just haven't been so easy for me as it use to be years ago. I don't write a rough draft on paper due to doing it better on a computer. If I do write on paper when it pertains to writing my stories, it's to only write down notes. Not only is that the problem, I can't stick to one plot at a time which is sort of confusing and annoys me. I don't like complaining so I'll just end here.


I suppose I always anchor what I am writing by asking myself, 'what do I want to tell people?' It might be something simple, like the feeling of spending a summer's morning at the market. I might be a political or ideological point that I want to illustrate. Sometimes I decide that I want to explore a hypothetical situation to an interesting logical conclusion. Or I might go larger and consider not only something I am worried about in society, but also bring my work into conversation with other pieces of fiction, either to respond to them, or to draw out what they brought to the medium, or maybe to pay homage to something really great. Once I know what my intentions are, I can keep control over my narrative.

I think the big picture part of writing is the most fun part. It's fun whether I am writing an essay, a poem, or a novel. And once I love an idea, then even the really annoying details somehow become less troublesome.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/22/14





Not really sure what I want to tell people. I always start off thinking one thing then thinks of something else. Once(still do) I thought about writing a military science fiction novel with some politics in it, that hard when you know nothing about it. Even doing research for it was hell. The thought never left my mind but new ideas come and things get more tedious. Writing is fun yet it feels like was fun sounds more appropriate.

As for reading books, I will have to hold off on both fiction and non-fiction for a while.
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20 / M / Here and now, Ete...
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Posted 3/22/14
I have a habit of doing far too much pre-preparation, however I think that fleshing out your world is important. As long as there is structure any fantasy or science-fiction world can be relatable. Our world too, works on sets of rules and principals.

As for grammar, I'd say mine is pretty atrocious at times but for the most part I do my best to present what I write in a clear and readable manner. As long as you can drag people into your writings, and grip them with your plot or characters, a few mistakes should be forgivable. Just, don't be glaring about it. Make it comprehensible.
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27 / F
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Posted 3/22/14

qualeshia3 wrote:






Not really sure what I want to tell people. I always start off thinking one thing then thinks of something else. Once(still do) I thought about writing a military science fiction novel with some politics in it, that hard when you know nothing about it. Even doing research for it was hell. The thought never left my mind but new ideas come and things get more tedious. Writing is fun yet it feels like was fun sounds more appropriate.

As for reading books, I will have to hold off on both fiction and non-fiction for a while.


I know what you mean about not wanting to read. I only recently started reading anything again after over a year of being completely uninterested in books.

This is from my limited observation only, however, based on what you said (not enjoying something you once enjoyed, needing a break from reading, uncertainty about what you want to say, being overwhelmed with too many ideas), it suggests to me that in a larger context, you are probably going through some sort of transition and growth period. Which is a good thing, so don't be too hard on yourself. And once you are done changing, you will either find that what you once enjoyed is now more fun and easier, or that you have a better idea of what it is you actually enjoy and you can give up old pleasures with less regret. And if none of this applies to you now, it is still good advice for any conflicted person who might read it, and most writery people tend to be conflicted at some point because of all the time they spend in their heads.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/22/14


Thank you.
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25 / F / New Jersey, USA
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Posted 3/22/14 , edited 3/22/14


Thanks.
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23 / M / Antarctica
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Posted 4/6/14 , edited 4/6/14
I'm pretty sensitive to plot holes :v so I tend to detail things out. Like reading it from finish to start over and over again. Asking questions like "how did it get there? how did it get here? why's that? why so? "
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22 / M / Here
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Posted 4/6/14
I usually write on the way of just not worrying about small things - outside of knowing where I want the story to go, and the way the characters should be, I don't worry about it. No one's going to read my typo-riddled first draft except for my beta readers, so it doesn't bother me to have bad grammar at first - you should edit at least three times before you say it's ready to be read, in my opinion.

As for other things like show don't tell and so forth? My advice is to amend it as needed in draft two! You can always go back and edit! It's always good to show the reader things, but you can always edit it later if it keeps you back from writing it the first time. You might even change the plotline by the end of the story, so you have to edit before sharing it. What initially wasn't foreshadowing might become foreshadowing when you write it, that's happened to me a lot.

Right now I'm working on a rewrite of a story that was over 100K when I first did it - and I'm changing a lot of stuff. I'll go a bit in-depth just in case anyone is interested.

Originally the story was basic - a group of characters gain superpowers from alien beings, and it follows their reaction.

About 20K words in I realized I wasn't going anywhere - it was just a few characters returning to fight each other. So I introduced a few government conspiracies and apocalyptic threats to give a consistent storyline to everything. Characters were linked together in new ways.

Of course, that idea came later so a lot of stuff felt... disjointed.

So now I've changed just about everything except who is in it and how they interact - the links are here from the start, even if not blatant, the government actions and apocalyptic threats are present in the beginning but won't be explained for some time. I'm aware of how things changed and where I want them to go a lot better now, so while it'll probably end up being over 100K words again it's going to be clear how everything flows together - nothing will seem random after finishing it this time.

I'll probably do a lot of revisions on it when done, but for now I'm doing a chapter-by-chapter editing process.
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