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Tanning to cosplay black characters is blackface?
Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14

Lethargic_leopard_Seal wrote:

Mimicry is the highest form of flattery, so you tan until you make Ice Cube look white.


Yes.


Trollking3 wrote:

I tanned your mamas hide last night


lol snap
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Posted 2/14/14

FangedHawk wrote:

meh, dont really see how its dehumanizing, sayings it dehumanizing is more offensive then changing your appearance to match another since it could be as if your saying they're not human. We're all just as human as the next person, so appearance whether it is skin or otherwise is pointless in such an argument. Appearance are merely a costume in of themselves, So no one has the right to be offended by another using any appearance even if it matches theirs.

As the constitution says. "everyone shall have the right to freedom of expression; this right shall include freedom to seek, receive and impart information and ideas of all kinds, regardless of frontiers, either orally, in writing or in print, in the form of art, or through any other media of his choice"

the whole racist bit of changing your appearance to match a difference race or skin color shouldn't even be a question of racism or offensive, unless you then go around and downplay their natural culture and heritage. just changing your appearance itself isnt offensive, and cosplaying is a form of media that is used to impart information and ideas. So, its a protected right. so if anyone is offended by such things then let them be. You will always have people who see stuff as racist, since they themselves generalize their race by skin color.


Well thought out boss like response. people are starting to forget that freedom of expression is in the constitution and are worring to much about whats "Politicaly Correct" and not expressing themselves the way they want, in fear of repricussions
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Posted 2/14/14

uncletim wrote:

Mr Popo




door was wide open for that one.
lmfaoo


inb4Jynx
Posted 2/14/14
Well I don't think it matters since they aren't trying to portray anything that would be racist, they're just trying to capture a character who they're devoted to appearance which I think is fine. I mean I'm tan, but there aren't much anime characters I'm aware of that don't have porcelain skin so I'll probably just change my skin color that one day I would cosplay.
Posted 2/14/14

SoldierSangria wrote:

Blackface is an exaggerated and absolutely racist form of makeup, meant to degrade Blacks both in appearance and manner.
.


I think I'm missing the point, how does it degrade blacks? It makes them looks cool and attractive to me.
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Posted 2/14/14

Sornette wrote:


SoldierSangria wrote:

Blackface is an exaggerated and absolutely racist form of makeup, meant to degrade Blacks both in appearance and manner.
.


I think I'm missing the point, how does it degrade blacks? It makes them looks cool and attractive to me.


This:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhavaXOynO8
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Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14
there is no PC way to do "Black Face" . Especially with the way it came about and what it actually represents/ed .

@Lady-Lillypadz: exactly

@Sornette: lol , yeah look more into it all you'll see.
Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14
Ugh I'm still lost. I'm obviously the slowest human in the world.


dragontackle wrote:

This:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhavaXOynO8


The video is not even meant to be comedic, it's art
Posted 2/14/14

Sornette wrote:


SoldierSangria wrote:

Blackface is an exaggerated and absolutely racist form of makeup, meant to degrade Blacks both in appearance and manner.
.


I think I'm missing the point, how does it degrade blacks? It makes them looks cool and attractive to me.


Are you trolling in any way, shape or form?
Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14

SoldierSangria wrote:


Are you trolling in any way, shape or form?


What, can't you just give me an explanation? There must be reason as to why you think it's degrading, right? I just wanna know what you're thinking about and who you are being considerate towards.
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Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14
That's like saying painting yourself gray to cosplay Homestuck characters is racist.
Posted 2/14/14

Sornette wrote:


SoldierSangria wrote:


Are you trolling in any way, shape or form?


What, can't you just give me an explanation?


What, can't you just use Google? And if you still can't decipher why Blackface is offensive after that, you have problems.
Posted 2/14/14

SoldierSangria wrote:

What, can't you just use Google? And if you still can't decipher why Blackface is offensive after that, you have problems.



"This reproduction of a 1900 William H. West minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co., shows the transformation from white to "black".

Blackface is a form of theatrical makeup used by white performers to represent a black person. It is often considered offensive, because it can imply stereotyped caricature of black people as in minstrel shows, and later vaudeville. The practice gained popularity during the 19th century and contributed to the proliferation of stereotypes such as the "happy-go-lucky darky on the plantation" or the "dandified coon".[1] In 1848, blackface minstrel shows were an American national art of the time, translating formal art such as opera into popular terms for a general audience.[2] Early in the 20th century, blackface branched off from the minstrel show and became a form in its own right, until it ended in the United States with the U.S. Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.[3]

Blackface was an important performance tradition in the American theater for roughly 100 years beginning around 1830. It quickly became popular elsewhere, particularly so in Britain, where the tradition lasted longer than in the US, occurring on primetime TV as late as 1978 (The Black and White Minstrel Show)[4] and 1981.[5] In both the United States and Britain, blackface was most commonly used in the minstrel performance tradition, but it predates that tradition, and it survived long past the heyday of the minstrel show. White blackface performers in the past used burnt cork and later greasepaint or shoe polish to blacken their skin and exaggerate their lips, often wearing woolly wigs, gloves, tailcoats, or ragged clothes to complete the transformation. Later, black artists also performed in blackface.

Stereotypes embodied in the stock characters of blackface minstrels not only played a significant role in cementing and proliferating racist images, attitudes and perceptions worldwide, but also in popularizing black culture.[6] In some quarters, the caricatures that were the legacy of blackface persist to the present day and are a cause of ongoing controversy. Another view is that "blackface is a form of cross-dressing in which one puts on the insignias of a sex, class, or race that stands in binary opposition to one's own."[7]

By the mid-20th century, changing attitudes about race and racism effectively ended the prominence of blackface makeup used in performance in the U.S. and elsewhere. It remains in relatively limited use as a theatrical device and is more commonly used today as social commentary or satire. Perhaps the most enduring effect of blackface is the precedent it established in the introduction of African-American culture to an international audience, albeit through a distorted lens.[8][9] Blackface's groundbreaking appropriation,[8][9][10] exploitation, and assimilation[8] of African-American culture—as well as the inter-ethnic artistic collaborations that stemmed from it—were but a prologue to the lucrative packaging, marketing, and dissemination of African-American cultural expression and its myriad derivative forms in today's world popular culture.[9][11][12]"

Oooh~ still don't see the big deal.
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Posted 2/14/14
@SoldierSangria: On a side note, "Get In The Fucking Robot Shinji" made me laugh then i seen the second one and XD lmfao
Posted 2/14/14 , edited 2/14/14
I have never heard such a statement until now. I do not see tanning to resemble your favorite character from a show equivalent to painting your skin just to demean and stereotype people. The individuals who assume they are the same should go do a thorough research behind blackface before forming another opinion about it.
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