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English Prepositions: 'In' and 'At'
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31 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 2/21/14
So I have debating in my head whether when to use the preposition 'in' and 'at' in a sentence. I am in disagreement with the dean of liberal arts at my school regarding the use of those two prepositions.

According to OWL Purdue University Online Writing Lab,


To express notions of place, English uses the following prepositions: to talk about the point itself: in, to express something contained: inside, to talk about the surface: on, to talk about a general vicinity, at.


The sentence in question is the following.


At India, the company Monsanto is one of the companies involved in providing GM seeds.


I am referring to that part as a general place but the dean of liberal arts told it was suppose to be "in".

What is anyone's take on this?
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22 / F / Winding Circle
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Posted 2/21/14
I'm not sure I understand the definitions but "At India" doesn't sound right. "In India" sounds better.

When I'm in doubt about how to phrase things, I say it aloud and if it doesn't make sense I don't use it.
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52 / M / In
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Posted 2/21/14
you be speaking the english talk good like
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31 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 2/21/14

uncletim wrote:

you be speaking the english talk good like


What?
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31 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 2/21/14

Ouzoathena11 wrote:

I'm not sure I understand the definitions but "At India" doesn't sound right. "In India" sounds better.

When I'm in doubt about how to phrase things, I say it aloud and if it doesn't make sense I don't use it.


But at times, a sentence that sounds better does not necessarily mean it is grammatically correct.
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52 / M / In
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Posted 2/21/14

thomascgty wrote:


uncletim wrote:

you be speaking the english talk good like


What?


What you for no understanding? It's as clear english for it is........sheesh


(just poking a little fun)

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31 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 2/21/14

uncletim wrote:


thomascgty wrote:


uncletim wrote:

you be speaking the english talk good like


What?


What you for no understanding? It's as clear english for it is........sheesh


(just poking a little fun)



XD
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18 / F / texas
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Posted 2/21/14 , edited 2/21/14

thomascgty wrote:


Ouzoathena11 wrote:

I'm not sure I understand the definitions but "At India" doesn't sound right. "In India" sounds better.

When I'm in doubt about how to phrase things, I say it aloud and if it doesn't make sense I don't use it.


But at times, a sentence that sounds better does not necessarily mean it is grammatically correct.


Very good point, it's like the "word" ain't, it sounds right but not grammatically correct.

At India makes sense, and so does In India. So here is where we hit a rough spot in the English language. It is constantly evolving and adding new words these days, and it is one of the hardest languages to learn. So At India or In India would both be correct, neither wrong.
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F / ar away
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Posted 2/21/14
I would say that "At India" is less correct than "In India." English commonly uses at in place of in when talking about a company, which is defined more by its presence and the people involved with it, than being an acutal place. India is a place with defined borders, therefore in is the proper preposition to use.
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21 / M / Florida
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Posted 2/21/14
I remember my teacher teaching us that when I was in Elementary School. Well, my first language is spanish and I would never say "at India".
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49 / M / Sussex UK
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Posted 2/21/14
The correct usage would be in India. One would use at to refer to the precise location.
IE In India Monsanto produce, gm seeds at their "wherever" plant.
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Posted 2/22/14
Conversational English as opposed to the English of academia.
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20 / M / Epic Funland (Fin...
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Posted 2/22/14 , edited 2/22/14
In India, because as far as I see its measured/limited area and if you are at it you are inside it and if you aren't at it you are outside of it.
"At" is approximate while "In" is quite accurate and when we look at boundaries of countries there ain't so many "gray areas" there, or so called no man's land, so they are quite accurate and you can't really be at it.

One way to look at it is that its radius outside of the object which gives you ability to call "at", so if you did that with India you wouldn't even be in India, but outside of it in some other country.

I live in Finland, but I don't say that I live at Russia, because as far as I see Finland is still solid Finland.

I made image out of this to clarify what I mean and I'm quite sure that this is the reason for why it is not at, but in.
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27 / M / Georgia
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Posted 2/23/14 , edited 2/23/14
You use "in" when you're referring to a location within a large geographic area, like a country or a continent.

I am in Spain.
The Vatican is in Italy.
The state of Florida is in North America.

You use "at" when you're talking about a small, local location/company/building/etc.

I'm at home.
I work at Best Buy.
Bob is staying at Holiday Inn.

Thus, the sentence is correctly written as this: In India, Monsanto is one of the companies involved in providing GM seeds.

Posted 2/23/14 , edited 2/23/14

thomascgty wrote:


Ouzoathena11 wrote:

I'm not sure I understand the definitions but "At India" doesn't sound right. "In India" sounds better.

When I'm in doubt about how to phrase things, I say it aloud and if it doesn't make sense I don't use it.


But at times, a sentence that sounds better does not necessarily mean it is grammatically correct.

No, that's exactly what grammatically correct means.
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