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English Prepositions: 'In' and 'At'
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25 / M / Canada
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Posted 2/24/14
I would write it "In India...", the way you wrote it sounds wrong and looks wrong to me.
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22 / M / Delaware
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Posted 2/24/14
It's unidiomatic, if it sounds wrong, it usually is.
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31 / M / Alhambra, CA
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Posted 2/26/14
English is confusing since there is conversational, academic, and business English.
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20 / M / Cardiff,Wales
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Posted 2/27/14 , edited 2/27/14
The preposition 'in' is the standard way of opening that sentence however you can also use 'at' without being wrong, it is simply a matter of how it sounds.
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Posted 3/10/14 , edited 3/10/14
"At" refers to the general vicinity as you said, but can also refer to a place. ie "at the bakery"
I think the difference here is in what sense you are refering to the place. "In the bakery" refers to the building as a specific location.
"at the bakery" is in context that you are going to interact with it.

For instance:

"John is buying bread in the bakery"

"John is buying bread at the bakery"

These sentences are similar but there are slight differences. In the first we assume John is getting bread that is sold by the bakery but in a very literal sense he could have bought it from someone else while standing in the bakery.
In the second John must have bought it from the bakery.

However, if we said "John is buying the bread while at the bakery" that means the same as the first. In this context the words have very similar meanings but interact with other words in different ways.
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