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Why aren't army tanks pink in real life?
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Posted 3/4/14
If tanks were pink it would sure liven up many town squares.
Posted 3/4/14
I always disliked being in convoys. In a convoy you stand out, you're an easy target, and obviously, the first round is explosives, of which there's little to no escape. Might as well paint it pink, IMO.
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Posted 3/4/14
I don't know, but they should cuz that tank is pimp!
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62 / M
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Posted 3/4/14
During WWII Tanks (and other vehicles) intended for desert warfare were painted tan. But the desert sun turned the tan tanks pink.
Posted 3/4/14
Hot pink tanks are just too badass. Tanks are pretty amazing themselves, but there's a point before they get too cool, y'know?
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Posted 3/4/14 , edited 3/4/14
Pink is still a surprisingly effective camo. But so far has only been effectively used by the British Armed forces (so far as I know)... and not on their tanks I believe.

It was used on spitfires (apparently clouds are more pink than we realize), for use at dawn and dusk, and also effective against cloud cover... but stands out more against blue of the sky.

It was used on SAS jeeps and landrovers in the desert, and as such was again effective in absorbing the desert colours, and as such were used by the British forces as such until they were replaced in 1985, (there are still examples though, of the newer land rovers also using these pinks, I believe it's largely dependent on location and campaign). Apparently a crash of an American bomber in the Australian desert showed the effectiveness of pink as a desert camouflage, as when the winds stripped the paint back, the the pinkish undercoat, causing the initial searches to fail due to the effectiveness of the camouflage as a result.

It was also used by the Navy, the colour known as Mountbatten Pink (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountbatten_pink) was used and proven effective during WWII. But there was a risk. If the mixing was off even slightly and too much red was used, it could counter and make the ship even more noticeable, similarly to that of the pink spitfire against the blue of the sky. Drab grey was considered safer and more effective against the blues than the pink was, and thus adopted more.
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25 / M / Inside Lorreen's...
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Posted 3/4/14
I have to agree with the other post about we already spend enough of our money on the stuff the military gets, and even more on "special projects", I don't mind paying for the military, I like having my lazy ass protected. I would mind though if they were spending my money to pimp their rides.
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23 / M / Kaguya's Panties
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Posted 3/4/14
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52 / M / In
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Posted 3/4/14
I feel that tanks shame...............No just no you will not turn my army Moe just no
Posted 3/4/14

mvirgilio wrote:

Pink is still a surprisingly effective camo. But so far has only been effectively used by the British Armed forces (so far as I know)... and not on their tanks I believe.

It was used on spitfires (apparently clouds are more pink than we realize), for use at dawn and dusk, and also effective against cloud cover... but stands out more against blue of the sky.

It was used on SAS jeeps and landrovers in the desert, and as such was again effective in absorbing the desert colours, and as such were used by the British forces as such until they were replaced in 1985, (there are still examples though, of the newer land rovers also using these pinks, I believe it's largely dependent on location and campaign). Apparently a crash of an American bomber in the Australian desert showed the effectiveness of pink as a desert camouflage, as when the winds stripped the paint back, the the pinkish undercoat, causing the initial searches to fail due to the effectiveness of the camouflage as a result.

It was also used by the Navy, the colour known as Mountbatten Pink (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountbatten_pink) was used and proven effective during WWII. But there was a risk. If the mixing was off even slightly and too much red was used, it could counter and make the ship even more noticeable, similarly to that of the pink spitfire against the blue of the sky. Drab grey was considered safer and more effective against the blues than the pink was, and thus adopted more.


Sogno- 
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Posted 3/4/14
because pink is an abominable color, of course
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Posted 3/4/14
Because pink attracts predators, and Phersu. And no tank is safe against a wild Phersu attack.
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21 / F / iowa
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Posted 3/4/14
you could have a pink tank if you have the money and the spray paint
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39 / M / Florida
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Posted 3/4/14
Since it was mostly answered: When I was playing paintball I always used to love pink fill.
What better way to see them in woods ball too when they had pink smears on their now useless camo!
There were a few people in the area who thought "pink, ewww, why would I want those?", but I reminded them that it was the other guy who was going to wear it!

In slightly unrelated, yet related, fun tidbits of information: The game Risk is always better if you can play the bubblegum pink pieces!
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Posted 3/4/14
Just paint all tanks invisible, problem solved
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