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Post Reply What are some good places for a good online education?
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26 / M / Waterloo, Ontario
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Posted 3/6/14
I want to become educated at the fraction of the cost a university degree. So far, I found Khan Academy.

https://www.khanacademy.org

What other good online education resources and places of learning exist?

There has got to be a more cost-effective way of getting educated than going to university. In fact, going to university is a extremely cost-ineffective way of getting educated.
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29 / M / Illinois
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Posted 3/6/14
What's your reasoning for wanting to further your education? This website looks fine if you wanna just self learn in your free time but I doubt it will be useful in helping you get a higher end job.

Go to a community college. The one around here is 93 bucks a credit hour. I've actually been doing research to possibly become an EMT. For a little under 9,500 dollars (plus those god damn books) you can get certified and start making between 30-45k a year.

I don't believe in spending 60,000k a year at an ivy league school to graduate a quarter million in debt with no guarantee of a job.
Dragon
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37 / M
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Posted 3/7/14
MIT opened up their courses for online learning over at http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/ - some great learning resources over there!
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48 / M / Reston, Virginia
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Posted 3/7/14
Coursera (https://www.coursera.org/). They have online classes from many different colleges, include Ivy League schools.

What are your goals for getting educated? If it is to learn some new skills you should be able to find some good courses online. If it is to get better employment, The benefit of having a degree and connections you make at university or college are valuable. Community colleges and State schools are a great way to lower the cost of schools. The community colleges in my area have programs that can count as your first two years of college at associated state universities.



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25 / M
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Posted 3/8/14
My goodness. That Khan Academy is so good for learning math.
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M / Wyoming
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Posted 3/8/14 , edited 3/8/14
Something that I have told both my teenagers about furthering their education after they finish high school.

Start out at the community colleges. Get your 2 year degree knocked out, this way about 95% of your general studies will be completed and during that time you can look at what specialized field of study that you want to go after at the 4-year college.

The big thing about going to a community college (2-year) is that the cost is going to be a little less strain on the wallet and at the same time you can still try to be close to home if that is something that you are looking at. Also, having that Associate Degree in hand will usually (not all the time) open up doors for you to some of the better 4-year colleges (also, depending on your grades) that you might not have access to before starting college.

Another option (this is not for everyone) is joining the military and having them give you the education that you are looking for. Medical is always in demand and most branches will just about put you through nursing school to get your RN certifications.

Last pearl of advice that I can give you or anyone for that fact...do your research. Just about everyone has access to the internet these days and you can use just about any search engine that you can come up with to find information about any of the colleges around the world.

Good luck in your hunt for your education!
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25 / F / Connecticut
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Posted 3/8/14 , edited 3/8/14
Perhaps going to a college/university is inefficient, but that degree can pay in connections and job opportunities. Alot of jobs nowadays flat out require you have a college degree, any degree. So yes, in a way going to college you are paying for a certifying piece of paper, you need to keep that in mind when you pay tuition.

So my question really is, what are you looking for? This is almost certainly one of two things.

1. Knowledge for the sake of getting a paying job.
2. Knowledge for the sake of knowledge, or anything else other than a paying job.

If it is item 1, well in most cases (there are some jobs out there where just knowing something is enough to get in, but they are few and far between) it would do you well to look into getting a degree. If you want to do it cheaply, physical (not online-only, unless there is a legitimate and accredited non-profit campus like MIT or Penn State. I'm saying this because schools like University of Phoenix aren't recognized by anyone.) community colleges and in-state schools are your best bet (assuming you're in the US). Alternatively, you can get a degree cheaper some places overseas.

If it is item 2, just learn using whatever resources you can, including Khan Academy I guess.
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32 / M / Atlanta, GA
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Posted 4/6/14 , edited 4/6/14
While this is true university is not cost effective, there's a point at which it might hurt you to go against the flow if everyone requires a degree these days. Think about it like the stock market. If everyone decides to sell their stock for cheaper and cheaper and you decide not to sell at some point you will lose all your investment because your remaining stock winds up worthless.

Degrees are slowly becoming like that. A point to understand here is that needs are very much social, since we still value a lot of important financial things relatively (e.g. labor, homes, vehicles, etc). If you wind up in the labor market with no degree and everyone else has one, how frequently do you think your labor will be valued less relative to everyone else? Right or wrong, really seems like it will happen.
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19 / M / UK
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Posted 6/14/14
Future Learn - You watch videos over a certain amount of time about a certain topic and you get a certificate. It's had very positive feedback.

Open University - all the courses are mostly online based I believe.
Posted 6/14/14 , edited 6/14/14
better to go to university and do those online things like coursera on the side. as a graduate you'll be earning more to do the same crappy job as someone who hasn't but who is in the same position... most of the times the person who climbed their way with no degree is way smarter too... it's quite funny.

it's no wonder during a recession graduates hardly land a job as employers prefer experience and internaly recruit as it is less costly in that situation.

so first and foremost predict how the economy will turn out (likelyhood) by the time you graduate.
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39 / M / Connecticut, USA
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Posted 6/14/14
You might want to look up Aleks. It is a site that will cost you money, but not that much.
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Posted 6/23/14
am not familiar with it but i sometimes hear my coworkers about university of phoenix. this based on nursing stuffs
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25 / M / NYC Metro Area
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Posted 12/25/14 , edited 12/25/14
Try APX, I took an online course through there about the history and culture of India for the hell of it. Very interesting and taught by experts in their field. Youtube is awesome for math and for languages I highly recommend Vista Higher Learning textbooks with online access code. Went from zero Spanish to intermediate level on my own (although I'd be lying if I left out dating native speakers, worked well for me ) . These methods are good for learning for the sake of learning, I would stay away from online degrees though, especially undergrad degrees with no real campus (usually diploma mills) or teachers have questionable qualifications.
Vempy 
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27 / F / Canada
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Posted 12/26/14
It really depends on what you are looking to go out if the courses at the end of the day. If you are looking for a degree it also depends on the field of study you are interested in.

I hate to say it, but the name on your degree can have some weight when you go job hunting.

Also, it says you are from Waterloo, so bear in mind a lot of these online sites mentioned are based in the states and I'm not sure how they transfer over into Canada. I would look into that before taking any online courses if you are hoping to end up with a degree at some point or are hoping to apply these credits toward a degree if you choose to go to university down the road.

If you plan on entering any career with a professional designation you need courses/a degree from an accredited university, which is generally not found online. These careers being doctor, dentist, optometrist, engineer, geologist, agrologist, etc.
Posted 12/31/14 , edited 12/31/14
Khan academy is great, but other than that, sadly I don't know. I'm trying something similar myself in order to learn things that I don't plan to use in a career, but just want to know. One avenue I have tried is public domain books. If what you're interested in has been studied for a long time, you might be able to find good public domain books to teach you about it. The problem is that since these usually aren't textbooks, you may have to look at many many sources to make sure you're getting good information and it takes ages to learn something simple. It hasn't worked that well for me, but I haven't put too much effort into it either (since I haven't had the time).

My reasoning was "Well famous people have studied this stuff before I was even born, and they must have learned it from somewhere, and where they learned it from likely isn't copyrighted anymore". XD

Let me know if you find anything good. Sorry I couldn't be more helpful.
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