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What are your thoughts about Intelligence and brain development
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Posted 3/11/14

aeb0717 wrote:

I don't know about this guy, but Phersu isn't like that. Phersu likes to use CR users as test subjects for his little mind games. He makes comments/threads like his "normal/average" topic and sits back to watch how people react. Phersu is an armchair-psychologist puppeteer, not a whiner.


Oh, he's like that huh? Wow. OK, I'll keep that in mind.
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I'm just a blonde monkey to you, aren't I?
Posted 3/11/14 , edited 3/11/14

lilliputian_otaku wrote:

So what exactly are you asking? There are different ways to interpret and explain intelligence. We are all on different levels. It sounds like the person who posted after you could more accurately articulate the points he intended to convey. I am sure I could dig through a few research articles and find evidence to support the relationship between brain development (not exactly sure how I would define that) and intelligence, but I do not think the information would be relevant. I may be wrong, but I think brain development (the developmental process in which the brain matures from infancy) is more or less complete by the age of 20-25. As long as your brain developed normally, the level of development would have little influence over your intelligence.

The intelligence you are talking about would have resulted from studying and education, not from a more developed brain. The level at which you could understand the valuable elements in the series was probably similar to the other person who replied, but your ability to explain what you saw was lacking.

When it comes to things like writing, interpretation, and comprehension that can be improved by studying and the acquisition of knowledge, intelligence is almost irrelevant. Some people may pick things up quicker than you, but with enough effort you will achieve the same results. That is just my opinion though. I could be completely wrong.


Pretty much this ^

- You can improve with practice
- It's good to notice the difference, copy it but not attribute it to intelligence but a learned style.



aeb0717 wrote:

He makes comments/threads like his "normal/average" topic and sits back to watch how people react. Phersu is an armchair-psychologist puppeteer, not a whiner.


Oh so I wasn't the only one thinking that... I was thinking of changing my post to his normal/average to make it more interesting ddammit.
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I. N. T. J.
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Intelligence is how capable you are at reasoning and how quickly you can learn. That being said, many seem to not understand this fact, and remark that simply because someone knows more than they, that said person is more intelligent. That is dead wrong and means nothing. A true indicator for intelligence is how well someone can deal with a situation that they have no direct prior knowledge of or are simply not prepared for.
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GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.
Posted 3/23/14

Hayagriva wrote:

GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.



TL:DR
"The superior man is distressed by the limitations of his ability; he is not distressed by the fact that men do not recognize the ability that he has."
Confucius
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I LACK ALL THE THINGS THE TITLE SAYS
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Posted 3/23/14

Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:

GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.



TL:DR
"The superior man is distressed by the limitations of his ability; he is not distressed by the fact that men do not recognize the ability that he has."
Confucius


If you didn't read it, you don't know what I said, so you have no way of knowing that your quote actually calls me a superior man (an irrelevant fact in all spheres of behavior), as well as exposing you as one of the people I was talking about. It doesn't get any more perfect than that.
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Posted 3/23/14 , edited 3/23/14
Intelligence has been closely tied to genetics as a contributing factor. However race/social background does not determine intelligence. In fact, IQ tests are extremely biased because they do not test how intelligent you are, but how modern you are, which is why someone from developing countries would score significantly lower on an IQ test than someone from developed Europe or North America. There are different forms of intelligence as well as several well-supported theories of multiple intelligences. (College Psychology)

P.S. I'd like to mention that Intelligence is not Memorization/Success in School but they can go hand in hand.

As for brain development, don't do drugs at an early age. The brain is still developing even after the legal drinking age. Also, if you're pregnant, PLEASE do not drink or do any drugs until after the pregnancy. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome can result and other teratogens are BAD for developing children and can give them serious brain deficiencies. It's very sad to see.

With that said, don't do drugs M'kay.
Posted 3/23/14 , edited 3/23/14

Hayagriva wrote:


Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:

GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.



TL:DR
"The superior man is distressed by the limitations of his ability; he is not distressed by the fact that men do not recognize the ability that he has."
Confucius


If you didn't read it, you don't know what I said, so you have no way of knowing that your quote actually calls me a superior man (an irrelevant fact in all spheres of behavior), as well as exposing you as one of the people I was talking about. It doesn't get any more perfect than that.


Sigh

You are an idiot. I summarized it, you write what you've borrowed.
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Posted 3/23/14

Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:


Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:

GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.



TL:DR
"The superior man is distressed by the limitations of his ability; he is not distressed by the fact that men do not recognize the ability that he has."
Confucius


If you didn't read it, you don't know what I said, so you have no way of knowing that your quote actually calls me a superior man (an irrelevant fact in all spheres of behavior), as well as exposing you as one of the people I was talking about. It doesn't get any more perfect than that.


Sigh

You are an idiot. I summarized it, you write what you've borrowed.


I write from experience. You also did not summarize the pseudo-intellectual snobbery I wrote about which are representing in exactitude, nor did you actually summarize anything since you merely wrote something you borrowed. Even more perfect.
Posted 3/23/14 , edited 3/23/14

Hayagriva wrote:


Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:


Sychop wrote:


Hayagriva wrote:

GayAsianBoy beat me to some of it - there are different types of intelligence.

The thing you have to understand about the outdated Prussian (Western) educational system is that it's designed for memorization and to produce good employees. Not employers, not independent thinkers. Some schools are a little better at that than others, but the framework remains the same.

Lots of people know about Japan's "superior" educational system. They don't know that Japanese teachers complain about the near-total absence of critical thinking in the curriculum - it's ALL memorization.

Real intelligence is understanding that you cannot beat time, and having appropriate humility where necessary. If I want to learn guitar, I'd probably go to my friend who's been playing for roughly 30 years, since he was in Kindergarten. Now, I've taught him on other subjects, but I would understand that in that particular place and time, our roles are reversed. That it would be my job to shut my mouth and absorb what he knows, because A.) I asked, and B.) I'm not in a position to judge or compare anything he knows to anything else, and C.) whatever goals I think I have are unformed and probably not based on anything other than whim. If I can do those things, I will learn very quickly. To me, that's real intelligence.

That's also something I don't see people doing very often. If you go ask someone to teach you something (assuming you have the humility to do so and the self-awareness that you lack the knowledge in the first place), they have to sell you on this "thing you already want to do", almost trick you into it. They need a great amount of material image to do this, which is usually irrelevant to what they know or what they can do. It's a magic act. And even after you "accept their acceptance", they need irrelevant markers of achievement to make you feel good about yourself, and continue doing this "thing you wanted to do", oftentimes dumbing down a more direct approach. Where they should only have to deal with actual problems in the learning process, they have to tangle with your ego instead, and you don't even have the grace to be apologetic for it. As a teacher, I can't tell you how much this slows down the acquisition of skill.

It doesn't really help that many of the markers of achievement in our society *coughdegreescough* are simple representations of this circus act, and frequently provide merely a beginning of the knowledge in that area (unless it's a mechanical field). You got a degree? Good, now you can start learning, stop standing on the shoulders of other's achievements. This, ladies and gentlemen, is why stupidity and lack of real skill in most things is pervasive. Once they get that piece of paper, (if they even have one), learning typically stops, and the assumptions begin.

There is one more thing lacking in today's version of intelligence: weight. We live in a world where people think they're intelligent because they have access to Wikipedia. It's tough when you're young and you don't really know shit, I understand. Rather than using that as an extremely useful method of changing your entire life for the better, for the duration of it, people get all huffy and prideful about what they don't know, if they even acknowledge it in the first place. That just baffles me. The only useful and relevant thing is to acknowledge that you don't know, so you can begin. But the scary thing is that people rarely have to earn what they know anymore, so they fling it in all directions at everyone's expense, knowledge incomplete, discipline non-existent because they didn't have to figure it out themselves.

A large portion of that is usually unavoidable because of the way we learn. We don't have time to learn everything about the world from scratch. If you ask me, a sign of real intelligence is knowing that you pretty much borrowed almost everything you know (if not exactly everything you know) and having the appropriate humility. Be grateful that you're part of the system, and if you're not creating something new while standing on the shoulders of those who came before you, close your mouth until you do so.



TL:DR
"The superior man is distressed by the limitations of his ability; he is not distressed by the fact that men do not recognize the ability that he has."
Confucius


If you didn't read it, you don't know what I said, so you have no way of knowing that your quote actually calls me a superior man (an irrelevant fact in all spheres of behavior), as well as exposing you as one of the people I was talking about. It doesn't get any more perfect than that.


Sigh

You are an idiot. I summarized it, you write what you've borrowed.


I write from experience. You also did not summarize the pseudo-intellectual snobbery I wrote about which are representing in exactitude, nor did you actually summarize anything since you merely wrote something you borrowed. Even more perfect.


Confucius also wrote from experience. Forgive me, you seem less flexible in your ability to understand, I summarized in order to find what I borrowed.
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Posted 3/23/14 , edited 3/23/14
But you're not writing from experience. Forgive me, you seem less flexible in your ability to communicate. You see if you agreed with what I wrote, we would not be having this discussion. If you take issue with it, it could only be because you disagree with it. Since it's founded on logic, the only reason to disagree with it is because you represent some or all of the negative aspects, and that bothers you. The inescapable beauty of the principle is that technically if it bothered you - you can only work on it. Arguing doesn't do anything. The only person who summarizes what other people say is technically a snob with no social grace who wants to show people they're more intelligent - and thus doesn't have any real intelligence.
Posted 3/23/14

Hayagriva wrote:

But you're not writing from experience. Forgive me, you seem less flexible in your ability to communicate. You see if you agreed with what I wrote, we would not be having this discussion. If you take issue with it, it could only be because you disagree with it. Since it's founded on logic, the only reason to disagree with it is because you represent some or all of the negative aspects, and that bothers you. The inescapable beauty of the principle is that technically if it bothered you - you can only work on it. Arguing doesn't do anything. The only person who summarizes what other people say is technically a snob with no social grace who wants to show people they're more intelligent - and thus doesn't have any real intelligence.


If you thought I was disagreeing with you then I believe you got me wrong and so, it would mean that you felt attacked hence this conversation. Your baseless assumptions on why someone would summarize other people also literally null your original post. Has it not occurred to you that I was merely complimenting you? You are the only one in need of reflection. I might be a snob but you are the worst kind, the kind with no grace. You are the only one looking for faults. Try as you may, you only make yourself look stupid.
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