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Animes That Murder Small Children
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52 / M / In
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Posted 3/14/14
murdering kids in anime is fine as long you don't flash their panties because that would be Loli fan service
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Posted 3/14/14

uncletim wrote:

murdering kids in anime is fine as long you don't flash their panties because that would be Loli fan service




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Posted 3/14/14
One of the things I dislike about Western TV shows and movies is that if there are kids in the scene and if there is danger no matter what happens the kids miraculously survive. In fact if the group splits up almost always the group that did not get the kids meets a gruesome death just to show how bad things are.
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Posted 3/14/14 , edited 3/14/14
I don't object to children dying, but I would object to a show going "We need to up the stakes, let's kill some kids for the shock factor" because that's just hamfisted emotional manipulation instead of a well written, compelling story.

It's like a sci-fi movie that's all special effects, an action movie that's all explosions, a horror movie that's all gore, or a romance movie that's all sex, it's just distractions to keep your ass in the seat without realizing you're watching bullshit.
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Posted 3/14/14

domvina wrote:

One of the things I dislike about Western TV shows and movies is that if there are kids in the scene and if there is danger no matter what happens the kids miraculously survive. In fact if the group splits up almost always the group that did not get the kids meets a gruesome death just to show how bad things are.


For Walking dead fans, anyone that remembers season 2, "SOPHIAA!!!!"


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Posted 3/14/14

essex1 wrote:


domvina wrote:

One of the things I dislike about Western TV shows and movies is that if there are kids in the scene and if there is danger no matter what happens the kids miraculously survive. In fact if the group splits up almost always the group that did not get the kids meets a gruesome death just to show how bad things are.


For Walking dead fans, anyone that remembers season 2, "SOPHIAA!!!!"




well the Brightside is they found her

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Posted 3/15/14
Deadman Wonderland:



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Posted 3/15/14 , edited 3/15/14
Higurashi is probably your literal extreme of children being murdered.

Here's one of many examples:
Warning, very very graphic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7h__sb87L4

To be honest though, I never had much a problem with this sort of thing in anime. Characters in anime are used as tools to convey a story and I almost never consider them to be people. They just don't act like it.

I've watched plenty of horror movies and violent action movies.
However, when I watched Pan's Labyrinth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan%27s_Labyrinth for the first time, there is a scene early on where a man beats another man to death in front of the camera. The camera doesn't move away during the scene and just focuses on the gore as one man smashes another man's face in.
I couldn't finish watching the movie after this. It was just appalling and I couldn't stand the fact that I had given money to the creator of such a disgusting scene. I returned the movie immediately.
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Posted 3/15/14 , edited 3/15/14

HauAreWe wrote:

I've watched plenty of horror movies and violent action movies.
However, when I watched Pan's Labyrinth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan%27s_Labyrinth for the first time, there is a scene early on where a man beats another man to death in front of the camera. The camera doesn't move away during the scene and just focuses on the gore as one man smashes another man's face in.
I couldn't finish watching the movie after this. It was just appalling and I couldn't stand the fact that I had given money to the creator of such a disgusting scene. I returned the movie immediately.

I'm not really sure what your tastes in film are, so I'm not saying you should go back to it, but I firmly believe that Pan's Labyrinth is something that could only have been created by a grandmaster filmmaker. Guillermo del Toro does have an occasional taste for the diabolical, but his characterization of Capitán Vidal is so insanely good. You're not dealing with a man who'd pass for Hollywood evil in this film, you're dealing with a man who has expunged his own conscience.

He is, in effect, the physical embodiment of fascism. If fascism lived and breathed, it would be with his heart and his lungs. You should to be appalled by his atrocity because, in every sense of the word, he is a purely atrocious man.

Goddamn that was such an awesome film.

I should go rewatch it later.

But anyway, tastes aside, just in case, I think you're severely missing out. But if you disagree that's cool.
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Posted 3/15/14

HauAreWe wrote:

Higurashi is probably your literal extreme of children being murdered.

Here's one of many examples:
Warning, very very graphic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7h__sb87L4

To be honest though, I never had much a problem with this sort of thing in anime. Characters in anime are used as tools to convey a story and I almost never consider them to be people. They just don't act like it.

I've watched plenty of horror movies and violent action movies.
However, when I watched Pan's Labyrinth http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pan%27s_Labyrinth for the first time, there is a scene early on where a man beats another man to death in front of the camera. The camera doesn't move away during the scene and just focuses on the gore as one man smashes another man's face in.
I couldn't finish watching the movie after this. It was just appalling and I couldn't stand the fact that I had given money to the creator of such a disgusting scene. I returned the movie immediately.


That scene in Pan's Labyrinth definitely left a mark on me the first time I saw it. It's one of the only violent scenes in film that I actually look away from because it's so brutally realistic. That said, Pan's is actually one of my favorite movies of all time. To each their own though.
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Posted 3/15/14 , edited 3/15/14

Insomnist wrote:

He is, in effect, the physical embodiment of fascism. If fascism lived and breathed, it would be with his heart and his lungs. You should to be appalled by his atrocity because, in every sense of the word, he is a purely atrocious man.

But anyway, tastes aside, just in case, I think you're severely missing out. But if you disagree that's cool.


I'm not sure if it has anything to do with my tastes since I didn't get far enough into the movie to get to the exposition.. I was simply citing the scene as one time in which I felt that violence had gone a bit too far in a movie.

Hm. This may sound odd, but it isn't the character and his violent act that bothered me. It was the the camera and cameraman as a character.

Ordinarily, the character of the camera/cameraman takes the place of the innocent and often naive bystander. In movies, the camera is a curious creature that peeks in on things and follows people that it believes are interesting or important. The camera wants to know what's going on.
Sometimes, especially in the horror genre, the camera's sight gets blurry or the camera gets shaky because something really bothers it.

Occasionally, the shock of a scene will keep its full attention, however it seldom moves around during such a scene.

In the case of Pan's Labyrinth, the camera is not only fully aware that someone violent has shown up, it wants a better look at the violence. It's sadistic enough to be curious about the extent of the violence in the scene as well.

Perhaps this is my trouble. I can't relate to Camera-chan in Pan's Labyrinth, and because I know that the camera can never suffer punishment for its actions, I can't stand the idea that the one in the movie is an antagonist.
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Posted 3/15/14 , edited 3/15/14

HauAreWe wrote:

I'm not sure if it has anything to do with my tastes since I didn't get far enough into the movie to get to the exposition.. I was simply citing the scene as one time in which I felt that violence had gone a bit too far in a movie.

Hm. This may sound odd, but it isn't the character and his violent act that bothered me. It was the the camera and cameraman as a character.

Ordinarily, the character of the camera/cameraman takes the place of the innocent and often naive bystander. In movies, the camera is a curious creature that peeks in on things and follows people that it believes are interesting or important. The camera wants to know what's going on.
Sometimes, especially in the horror genre, the camera's sight gets blurry or the camera gets shaky because something really bothers it.

Occasionally, the shock of a scene will keep its full attention, however it seldom moves around during such a scene.

In the case of Pan's Labyrinth, the camera is not only fully aware that someone violent has shown up, it wants a better look at the violence. It's sadistic enough to be curious about the extent of the violence in the scene as well.

Perhaps this is my trouble. I can't relate to Camera-chan in Pan's Labyrinth, and because I know that the camera can never suffer punishment for its actions, I can't stand the idea that the one in the movie is an antagonist.

It's interesting that, basically, that means Guillermo del Toro did his job too well in this case.

I'm not sure I've ever thought of the camera as a character, which made a particular twist in Hyouka quite interesting. I think of it as the director's eyes. And in this case, it sounds like you got almost too full dose of what he intended.

I just have this image of Peter Jackson demonstrating their virtual reality camera work whenever I think of cameras. He had a headset hooked up to a virtual reality rig and a fake camera in his hands, and they showed how inside this virtual realm he was using the fake camera to line up the shots he wanted of the cave troll during the fight in Balin's Tomb in The Fellowship of the Ring. Here, del Toro wanted to impress on the audience what Capitán Vidal was capable of.

There's a balancing scale to shock factor in terms of skill, I think. An amateur just uses it superficially, and in those situations it's not to be commended--they're just covering up for the fact that the story they're making is kind of shitty by using shock (and sometimes awe) techniques to distract from it. But in the hands of a skillful artisan, the shock informs the story, rather than overawes it. This scene especially was paramount in characterizing Capitán Vidal for the audience.

I'm not sure if you saw the scene all the way through, but

But yeah, del Toro was definitely out to appall the audience with that scene. So... I guess he succeeded, if too well.

Edit: And by tastes I meant it to include things like graphic violence and aesthetics, not just a quality or genres, etc.


Also, as trivia, Guillermo del Toro is the guy trying to bring Monster to HBO. I'm really excited to see him succeed.
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Posted 3/15/14

AsahinaInu wrote:


evilswitchkix wrote:

The intriguing part is, this aspect of Fate Zero is totally irrelevant from the plot.

It's incredibly relevant. You realize that all of the class characters were based on historical or mythic figures right? The thing Gilles de Rais(Caster),a real life historical figure and companion of Jeanne d'Arc, is primarily known for is being one of the earliest examples of a serial killer(at least in theory. there is some speculation that he could have been framed by the Duke of Brittany). He would lure in children and give them a grand old time, and then would turn around then tie them up and hang them from the ceiling and masturbate on them, then he would turn around again and comfort them afterwards saying he only wanted to play, and then finally after the child was comforted and relieved he would kill them in gruesome ways sometimes sitting on their chest and laughing at them in the face while they died. The whole story was so horrific that it is thought that Gilles de Rais was the inspiration for the classic fairy tale of Bluebeard.

The way caster killed those kids in Fate Zero was an accurate representation of the the historical figure the character was based on.


This paragraph has me conflicted.

On one hand, I just played South Park; The Stick of Truth. And spend a good while killing young children and babies with an Alien Vibrator.

On the other hand, I just spend a spent a few hours previous to that playing Dark Souls 2, in which I was brutally killed time and again by the most punishing bosses I've fought in a long while(Company of Champions first playthrough or ur filthy casual), and the whole "sitting on them laughing" feeling is what I Dark Souls 2 is designed around


Hey, the entire Gundam Franchise preaches how "Children shouldn't fight their parents wars, yet they always are" as a main theme. The main characters are generally rather oung, and they're being murdered all the damn time.

Aaaaand lets not forget the soul crushing tone and settting of "Now and Then, Here and There" in which the story focuses on Child Soldiers being force to murder child not-soldiers, or enslave child not-soldiers, or perhaps be raped by not-child soldiers. Overall, if you want something which child death is heavy, go watch that. It's a great great show.
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Posted 3/15/14 , edited 3/15/14

Felstalker wrote:

On the other hand, I just spend a spent a few hours previous to that playing Dark Souls 2, in which I was brutally killed time and again by the most punishing bosses I've fought in a long while(Company of Champions first playthrough or ur filthy casual), and the whole "sitting on them laughing" feeling is what I Dark Souls 2 is designed around

This is totally tangential to the discussion, but while we're here:

This had better have a quality PC port.
This had better have a quality PC port.
This had better have a quality PC port.

THIS HAD BETTER HAVE A QUALITY PC PORT.

I'm waiting very patiently to find out when it comes out, but this had better have a quality PC port...
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Posted 3/15/14

Insomnist wrote:

I'm not sure I've ever thought of the camera as a character. I think of it as the director's eyes.


That's interesting.. Perhaps I'm strange then.

I've never been able to consider a camera as the director's eyes. There are too many factors that are outside of their control and too many hands in the representation of the camera. The camera is like a puppet or a 3D animated character. You can only do certain things with the camera and must work within its boundaries once everything has been laid.

In live action, the camera must be accommodated for just as much as any actor. You must set up the scene, the special effects, and every character with the camera in mind. It's just like how you would set up the roles of the actors in a scene. What do you want the role of the camera to be? What does the camera want to see? It's very important. In 3D CG animation, the camera's position and movement is just as important as any other character. It's a big part of the experience.

Not to say that the camera is one character. You can have different camera personalities.

Psycho is a good example. The camera that accompanies the owner of the Bates Motel has been twisted by the environment it has developed in. It stalks people, it looks at the twisted nature of the hotel owner, it has been influenced by his desires. In fact, I believe that it practically calls the main character out to the Motel in the same way that an apparition may beckon its victims.

However, there is a second camera that accompanies the male protagonists at times. This camera is looking for clues. It's been influenced by the sense of duty and responsibility of its compatriots and it wishes to witness the crimes of the killer as a means of nailing down its suspect.

Cameras can't really help a protagonist, much like a sidekick to a detective, and they can't communicate, but they help establish a scene.

Maybe my view on this is strange though. Based on interviews, etc, several highly influential directors consider the camera to be an omnipotent avatar of the viewer while other influential artists consider it as a tool to show off the world they have envisioned for their script and story.
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