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Post Reply Can you watch Crunchyroll offline?
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 4/9/16 , edited 4/9/16
Ripping DVDs and BDs for personal use is indeed illegal under the DMCA due to it requiring bypassing copy protection, but I dare anyone to find a case of where someone has been arrested for such, much less prosecuted.

When the government can't even be bothered to try and "make an example" of someone for an illegal act, should it really be considered illegal (from a moral stance)? At what point does it become akin to outdated laws that are still on the books (usually due to being forgotten and ignored) that no one obeys, and even a court would be tempted to respond with, "Seriously?" if someone were arrested and prosecuted under them.

Of course, one reason this probably hasn't happened is the MPAA is terrified of this provision of the DMCA being tested in court (in relation to personal use).
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Posted 6/27/16 , edited 6/27/16
someone shoiuld do this rn @crunchyroll 5 hour flights are no fun w/o streaming your fav weeb shit
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Posted 6/28/16 , edited 7/16/16

sugoibutt wrote:

someone shoiuld do this rn @crunchyroll 5 hour flights are no fun w/o streaming your fav weeb shit


from what i understand, Amazon Prime is the only service that lets you legally download anime videos for offline viewing, and only if you have a smartphone or a tablet. The anime catalogue is pretty limited though. The only other option is either buying the disks or using non-legit means.
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Posted 7/16/16
unfortunately you're right ;//
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Posted 9/18/16

Xenith1988 wrote:

I really don't want to revive a dead post (as I so totally am) but something about my OCD's make inaccuracies very bothersome.

Violating DRM protection or any DMCA is illegal.

Definitions are below
.

A couple of links to help hit the nail on the head concerning this topic:

http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own

http://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/is-it-legal-to-make-backup-copies-of-my-purchased-dvds-and-blu-rays-564502/

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/10/its-still-illegal-to-rip-dvd-and-blu-ray-discs-for-personal-use/

Now, if you want the TL/DR I can say it for you.

Put simply, copying = illegal. There are exceptions of course, and these exceptions change often as well as expire (things that were legal are illegal and vice versa) The copyright game is a very complicated legal mess and the only possible form of 'getting away with copy right infringement' lies behind the guise of 'educational use'.

For example... you want to write a blog on the comparisons of different directors. You want to clarify the 'Action' genre but defining which directors are commonplace. You copy Michael Bay clips, John McTiernan clips, Steven Spielberg clips and Peter Jackson clips. You take these clips, ripped straight from medias protected by DMCA and post them ONLINE for others to see. As long as it is CLEARLY and UNDERSTANDABLY evident to be IN USE as studying material... it will NOT be illegal. Now, I will say this. This is STILL a lawyer battle in court. The 'educational use' has been used during The Pirate Bay era and other torrent websites. So it is not a safe alternative.

PS: I am not sure whether or not they have changed the length of the film copied for studying or not. I think there was some law out there that prohibits the copying of an entire film for study purposes. I am not an expert and am unsure.


You can argue the point behind 'personal use' or 'media shifting' (moving a CD-ROM to a DVD-ROM or HDD/SDD) but the fact is these can ALSO be illegal depending on the media being copied.

This is a heated topic that can be argued for a decent length of time if you find yourself wanting more clear facts I'd recommend the following two websites to help explain things:

https://wustl.edu/about/compliance-policies/computers-internet-policies/legal-ethical-software-use/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Millennium_Copyright_Act

BOTTOM LINE: Do NOT copy any material without consulting the Copyright holder first, if you choose to copy something (Which 90% of the world does btw) then the do NOT share it! SHARING is what really gets people busted. Simply copying things for personal use is ILLEGAL but honestly, not pursued heavily by the courts of law. If you copy something, put it on your computer, don't share it on the web and view it on your own time that's technically 'fine'. You ARE breaking the law but it isn't something that will land you in jail easily. If you have such materials on your computer and you feel your computer might be seized, it'd be a good time to throw away hard drives.

This is my long post. I apologize to any 'wall of text' haters out there.
You just quoted a bunch of American laws. First off, not everyone here is American, second: all the anime on crunchyroll is produced in Japan... which is a country, ie: American laws don't apply, Japanese laws would.

Noone here was asking to make a copy for a saved download to be used somewhere else. Anything you watch online whether streamed or not it is downloaded to your device, all the data is there already. All people are asking for is the ability for the crunchyroll apps to cache or save the stream temporarily to be watched later offline still using the same app, not to keep a file of it for later use elsewhere or for distribution. The app can then wipe the cached content later. So since crunchyroll already has the Japanese copyright holders permission this nullifies your whole argument if the data is restricted to use on the app whether on or offline.
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Posted 9/18/16

pannath wrote:


Xenith1988 wrote:

I really don't want to revive a dead post (as I so totally am) but something about my OCD's make inaccuracies very bothersome.

Violating DRM protection or any DMCA is illegal.

Definitions are below
.

A couple of links to help hit the nail on the head concerning this topic:

http://lifehacker.com/5978326/is-it-legal-to-rip-a-dvd-that-i-own

http://www.cnet.com/forums/discussions/is-it-legal-to-make-backup-copies-of-my-purchased-dvds-and-blu-rays-564502/

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/10/its-still-illegal-to-rip-dvd-and-blu-ray-discs-for-personal-use/

Now, if you want the TL/DR I can say it for you.

Put simply, copying = illegal. There are exceptions of course, and these exceptions change often as well as expire (things that were legal are illegal and vice versa) The copyright game is a very complicated legal mess and the only possible form of 'getting away with copy right infringement' lies behind the guise of 'educational use'.

For example... you want to write a blog on the comparisons of different directors. You want to clarify the 'Action' genre but defining which directors are commonplace. You copy Michael Bay clips, John McTiernan clips, Steven Spielberg clips and Peter Jackson clips. You take these clips, ripped straight from medias protected by DMCA and post them ONLINE for others to see. As long as it is CLEARLY and UNDERSTANDABLY evident to be IN USE as studying material... it will NOT be illegal. Now, I will say this. This is STILL a lawyer battle in court. The 'educational use' has been used during The Pirate Bay era and other torrent websites. So it is not a safe alternative.

PS: I am not sure whether or not they have changed the length of the film copied for studying or not. I think there was some law out there that prohibits the copying of an entire film for study purposes. I am not an expert and am unsure.


You can argue the point behind 'personal use' or 'media shifting' (moving a CD-ROM to a DVD-ROM or HDD/SDD) but the fact is these can ALSO be illegal depending on the media being copied.

This is a heated topic that can be argued for a decent length of time if you find yourself wanting more clear facts I'd recommend the following two websites to help explain things:

https://wustl.edu/about/compliance-policies/computers-internet-policies/legal-ethical-software-use/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Millennium_Copyright_Act

BOTTOM LINE: Do NOT copy any material without consulting the Copyright holder first, if you choose to copy something (Which 90% of the world does btw) then the do NOT share it! SHARING is what really gets people busted. Simply copying things for personal use is ILLEGAL but honestly, not pursued heavily by the courts of law. If you copy something, put it on your computer, don't share it on the web and view it on your own time that's technically 'fine'. You ARE breaking the law but it isn't something that will land you in jail easily. If you have such materials on your computer and you feel your computer might be seized, it'd be a good time to throw away hard drives.

This is my long post. I apologize to any 'wall of text' haters out there.
You just quoted a bunch of American laws. First off, not everyone here is American, second: all the anime on crunchyroll is produced in Japan... which is a country, ie: American laws don't apply, Japanese laws would.

Noone here was asking to make a copy for a saved download to be used somewhere else. Anything you watch online whether streamed or not it is downloaded to your device, all the data is there already. All people are asking for is the ability for the crunchyroll apps to cache or save the stream temporarily to be watched later offline still using the same app, not to keep a file of it for later use elsewhere or for distribution. The app can then wipe the cached content later. So since crunchyroll already has the Japanese copyright holders permission this nullifies your whole argument if the data is restricted to use on the app whether on or offline.


Offering such a feature would require additional rights that CR may not already have.
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Posted 9/18/16
Amazon prime has limited anime and allows downloads for trips! Give it a try!
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 9/18/16

pannath wrote:

You just quoted a bunch of American laws. First off, not everyone here is American, second: all the anime on crunchyroll is produced in Japan... which is a country, ie: American laws don't apply, Japanese laws would.

As CR is based in the US, they would have to comply with US laws. As for the user, they would have to comply with the laws for their country.

Japanese laws actually don't factor in outside of Japan, but Japanese copyrights do (due to international treaties), as does any contractual agreement CR made with Japanese publishers.

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Posted 9/22/16
They could offer the offline watching service in the app for premium members who are actually paying for content, so it's like a rental. It's fairly easy to rip media off the site and do it, so anyone asking for the option to watch it offline, which would have the app keep the download available for watching obviously don't want to use the videos for other purposes, or they wouldn't go through all the trouble of trying to even get this feature. As I said before, when you stream something the whole video is already downloaded onto your computer, the computer just removes a copy of it when it's done, this way would just allow you to have access to it for a bit longer.
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Posted 9/23/16 , edited 9/23/16

Xenith1988 wrote:

Simply copying things for personal use is ILLEGAL but honestly, not pursued heavily by the courts of law.


Kind of like speed limits on interstate highways everyone and their mother is doing 70 even though the law technically says 65 but you generally wont get in trouble unless your being stupid and reckless (IE uploading torrents)
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 9/24/16

pannath wrote:

They could offer the offline watching service in the app for premium members who are actually paying for content, so it's like a rental.

"Like a rental" is the key, since content providers like to charge more for that.

About the only company at this point that has managed to work out offline viewing for streaming video subscribers is Amazon. Even then, the capability is limited to mobile devices (i.e., no downloading to your notebook PC for offline viewing on a plane).

Der Zoodirektor
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Posted 9/24/16 , edited 9/24/16

TheAncientOne wrote:
"Like a rental" is the key, since content providers like to charge more for that.

About the only company at this point that has managed to work out offline viewing for streaming video subscribers is Amazon. Even then, the capability is limited to mobile devices (i.e., no downloading to your notebook PC for offline viewing on a plane).



Mobile devices are much easier to use DRM on.

Downloads require a separate license for Electronic Sell-Through, which is basically what iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, or Steam offer.
There is actually plenty of anime on those platforms available for download, but the amount of users taking up these offers is low. That is why EST licenses are not currently a hot commodity. To sustain a download option you basically have to ask for separate fees for each of those downloads, pushing the costs for the consumer closer to that of a physical disc, close to a point where it makes more sense to just buy the disc instead.

Good example: Sentai just announced the release of various anime movies on Steam the other day (/anime-news/2016/09/22/sentai-filmworks-offers-twelve-anime-movies-on-steam), offering the download at $12.99, which is in part even more expensive than the retail price of the respective discs on Amazon.
The Wise Wizard
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Posted 9/24/16

shinryou wrote:

Downloads require a separate license for Electronic Sell-Through, which is basically what iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, or Steam offer.
There is actually plenty of anime on those platforms available for download, but the amount of users taking up these offers is low. That is why EST licenses are not currently a hot commodity. To sustain a download option you basically have to ask for separate fees for each of those downloads, pushing the costs for the consumer closer to that of a physical disc, close to a point where it makes more sense to just buy the disc instead.

That is why Amazon Prime Video is somewhat unique, in that they've somehow arranged to make this feature available for their streaming titles that are available at no extra charge for Prime subscribers, without any additional fee.

I expected when they initially announced this last year it would only be for their own titles and perhaps some they acquired after the announcement, but I have yet to run across one that doesn't offer the option (although supposedly it isn't every title).

I doubt they are simply taking a loss every time this option is selected, as I noticed when checking some titles on my Fire 7 before posting this reply, it appears to be the default, rather than simply streaming.

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Posted 10/18/16
Well Netflix is apparently going to offer offline streaming in the next two months.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/182332/20161014/netflix-reportedly-will-introduce-offline-viewing-within-next-two-months.htm

Even if only a few older shows were available for offline viewing, it would be fantastic. I have a three hour daily commute and a lot of it is through a tunnel, and right now I have to rip Netflix DVDs to AVI and upload them to my tablet. The ability to download some shows through Crunchyroll would be fantastic.

It's a shame that the big content producers haven't caught on that they can't shoehorn the old distribution model into the digital age.
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Posted 10/19/16

securitywyrm wrote:

Well Netflix is apparently going to offer offline streaming in the next two months.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/182332/20161014/netflix-reportedly-will-introduce-offline-viewing-within-next-two-months.htm

Even if only a few older shows were available for offline viewing, it would be fantastic. I have a three hour daily commute and a lot of it is through a tunnel, and right now I have to rip Netflix DVDs to AVI and upload them to my tablet. The ability to download some shows through Crunchyroll would be fantastic.

It's a shame that the big content producers haven't caught on that they can't shoehorn the old distribution model into the digital age.


You're comparing a company with with 83 million monthly active users to a service that likely only has less than 1% of that number.
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