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Post Reply What's your favorite fantasy book/series?
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32 / M / Houston Tx
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Posted 3/28/17
I'm very fond of Anne Rice's Vampire Chronicles.
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M / Cali
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Posted 4/23/17 , edited 4/23/17
Rangers Apprentice- John Flanagan i second or third this
Redwall series by Brian Jacques was my childhood
LoTR/Sil/Hobbit too
and Eragon/Inheritance cycle/Percy Jackson were good too
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F / Antique bookshop
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Posted 4/24/17
harry potter series


twilight series
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Posted 5/3/17
The Gentleman Bastards Sequence by Scott Lynch, brilliant world building, interesting characters, and a constantly fresh premise makes this series my first to recommend when it comes to fantasy.
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Posted 5/8/17
The Kingkiller Chronicle (although unfinished atm) is VERY good. My all time favorite series would have to be The Inheritance Cycle since it's what first got me really into fantasy.
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Posted 7/12/17
anything by Michael Moorcock, particularly Elric which is very influential on dark fantasy and conveniently very good as well
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Posted 7/19/17
The Dresden Files. All-time favorite series.





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22 / O / Brazil/Portugal
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Posted 7/26/17
I can't really pick one favorite, but I love anything by Brandon Sanderson (with Steelheart and Elantris being my favorites among his works), and I loved The Black Magician trilogy, it's prequel The Magician's Apprentice, and it's sequel, The Traitor Spy trilogy, by Trudi Canavan. Laini Taylor's Daughter of Smoke & Bone also has a special place in my heart.

There's also Harry Potter, though that is also due to that nostalgia/childhood feel, and The Chronicles of Vladimir Tod by Zac Brewer.
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Posted 7/26/17
A trilogy I like is the Engineer series by KJ Parker. It's fantasy, but only in the sense that it's not earth and is in the past. There's no magic, no monsters, no alternate dimensions, no gods, not even any religion.

The story is fascinating, the Engineer of the series title is morally complex and it's darkly hilarious in sections that I suspect were not intended to be funny (exhibit A - a prisoner execution scene)
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Posted 7/29/17
I really liked the Michael Vey series by Richard Paul Evans.
Posted 8/3/17
Three Lives Three Worlds, Ten Miles of Peach Blossoms by Tangqi Gongzi

Fun Fact: this story was plagiarized that made it to a hit series in China. Now the movie is yet to come sometime in August known as Once Upon a Time. Overall the novel is quite fascinating.
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44 / M / Corpus Christi, T...
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Posted 9/10/17
Kushiel's Dart by Jacqueline Carey is exceptional. There is a heavy erotic element, so fair warning. It's important to the story and well-handled. I haven't read any further in the series, though.

Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay is a clinic on worldbuilding and is a very good read.

I loved Glen Cook's Black Company series, at least the first trilogy. Gritty, hard-bitten, but full of gallows humor and actually touching in places.
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58 / M / Houston, TX
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Posted 20 days ago
I'm going to say the following:

The Witchworld Series by Andre Norton. I'd include some of the other novels such as "The Jargoon Pard" as they're set in the same universe.
The Honor Harrington series by David Weber.
The Heralds of Valdemar series by Mercedes Lackey.

I also liked the urban myths written by Thorne Smith, back from the 1920's and 1930's. Especially "Rain in the Doorway", one of his best works. Then again, when you have sections like this, you shouldn't be surprised:

--Satin's eyes, as she studied the man's face, were unusually bright. And behind the brightness lay other things which Hector Owen had not the penetration to see. There were a certain tenderness and an understanding. There were emotions that surprised the girl herself, but she only smiled half mockingly when she spoke.

"Nonsense," she said, taking him in her arms. "What you need is a nice low-living, hard-drinking girl like myself, and I'm going to see that you get her."

Mr. Owen did.--
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Posted 11 days ago
Brandon Sanderson - Pretty much everything he writes.

The Abhorsen Trilogy - Garth Nix

Harry Potter - J K Rowling (Had to be said)

Percy Jackson - Rick Riordan

Good Omens - Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

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Posted 11 days ago , edited 11 days ago
This is embarrassing to admit... but I do enjoy reading David Edding's Belgariad from time to time. So many fantasy authors these days expect you to think! I don't want dozens of characters to keep track of, I want entire countries populated by a single character type. That way I can put my brain on autopilot and enjoy.

Sample of thought process while reading these books:
This character is a Murgo.... They are bad! This character is a Drasnian.... They are tricky!

Then, if you want more of the same you can read the Mallorean, and it really is more of the same.

To paraphrase a conversation that actually occurs in the Mallorean:
Generic Arthur-like character to his equivalent Merlin. "Say, aren't these events just like those in our last book series.... I mean exactly the same?" To which Pseudo Merlin replies, "Of course, but -something about prophesy that makes the blatant rewrite plausible- but we have new races to stereotype!"

Some people will tell you that these books are trash literature and those people are right, but I can almost guarantee that I'll read them at least one more time in my life. You might ask why, but the reason is simple. Sometimes it is fun to read five books about a fairly clear cut struggle between good and evil, and then read five more books that are pretty much the same without the need to develop any new characters, because they are returning from the previous series, their personality is defined by their race, or they simply don't have a personality.
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