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Some Thoughts About Art
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Posted 3/22/14
First of all, let me start by saying this is in the general discussion as it is not asking about art advice or an artist's perspective. I want the perspective of people who aren't artists. Who don't draw. Because they don't want to or believe they can't. So I appreciate if you didn't move this or think it is in the wrong section.

Now, my question is rather simple.

Do you think drawing, learning how to draw, being an artist, is something your born with or is it teachable? Or rather, can someone without some innate art talent learn how to be an artist?

Discuss.
Posted 3/22/14
Ok...I might have trouble explaining myself clearly here but I am going to take a shot at it.

I think anyone with enough practice can eventually learn how to draw or paint or whatever. I don't think that someone has to necessarily draw really well to be considered an artist. So I would say yes...it is teachable. But not so much as teaching someone how to draw or paint better so much as it is teaching them how to find new ways to express various thoughts or feelings into whatever it is they are drawing. I also do not believe that anyone who just throws a picture down onto a piece of paper is really an artist either while at the same time if someone were to draw or paint a picture of art from someone else I think it can be considered art if it includes their perception of the original piece instead of a straight copy of it.

In short, we all have thoughts and feelings that can be given form in various ways which I believe would make a person an artist.

Also...if someone who throws up on canvas (or people) can be called an artist I sure as hell won't exclude others from being labeled as such.
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Posted 3/22/14
I don't think anyone is really" born " with a particuar talent.

We all have to practice at our talent for some time, even if its just a week or w/e

The difference I think is that some people are able to do some things with such ease and grace that it seemed imbued w/i them .


thats my opinion
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Posted 3/22/14
In every area there will be prodigies that are born with a special talent, but also in every area it is teachable and so long as that person tries hard enough they can at least become passable in that area, maybe even great!This of course also applies to art.
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Posted 3/22/14
While having "talent" does help, you can still learn without it (usually...). I personally would consider myself a "talented" artist, however because I've never really worked on honing that skill I am just okay. I know plenty of people who worked hard and are now way better than I will ever be.
Sogno- 
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Posted 3/22/14
i think both.

a lot of people argue about the whole "talent" thing. to me it's obvious if someone has talent, and to turn your nose up at someone who compliments you on your talent is extremely pretentious.

... with that said, i do think someone without a good sense of artistic ability can become an artist if he practices & works hard. will he be as good as someone with an innate ability? Possibly, if the latter never hones the skills necessary. One can be born having an understanding of art but if he doesn't practice and gain the skills, then he's not gonna get anywhere.

personal example:



these are more fine art things, but hopefully my point is made. i think to be extremely good at something you have to be both talented (something within) AND you have to practice the lessons/skills needed constantly and always be willing to learn more.

... although even i can draw a square within a square i guess as far as art is concerned you can always go to the never-ending question of "what is art"
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Posted 3/22/14 , edited 3/22/14
:I I'm not sure I'm allowed to post here butttt
Art is definitely teachable. There are certain elements and principles to art, and no matter if you're drawing abstractly or realistically, there are guidelines to form and color, and everything else they put in those posters in art classrooms. You can go some ways with observation on your own, but why do that when people did all the observing for you centuries ago and you can just have people tell you what to look out for?

But talent definitely plays a part in it. For most people, no, art is not talent. Art is blood and sweat and mostly tears, but for some people, it just clicks faster. That's what I define as talent. An innate ability to understand the underlying elements of art, and employ it faster than most people. It's the way they think, the way they know. Like a fish in water.

Like some people just know what colors to put where, and it'll look good. That can be taught, but most of it's an intuition on what to put where, and how much. Most people have to make several thumbnails testing out the best possible combination, but some people just go and it's perfect. Their intuition, their understanding about color is so good, that they can skip all that work. It's a little like being able to do mental math when everyone else needs a pen and paper.
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Posted 3/22/14
I love doodling and art, but i don't believe i could ever draw as a profession. it looks too complicated. but i do enjoy other things in art.
i believe people are born with talent, but i have seen people rise up from vague scribbles to beyond accurate self portraits, so i don't believe it can only be acquired through birth.
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Posted 3/22/14
I know you said no artists in here but...

I don't think someone can be born with the skill and technique for art. Art is teachable to anyone who will dedicate themselves. Practice improves your skill but you will never get better unless you learn different types of skills, techniques, tips, etc. Even though I've never taken an art class I wouldn't be as good as I am now without someone telling me what HB pencils are, what a kneaded eraser can do, different types drawing paper, how to shade properly, etc. Ever notice the people who don't draw and say their art sucks are the ones who never try to improve? As long as your apply yourself fully, you can be just as good as anyone else.
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Posted 3/22/14
Perhaps I should explain my feelings on the matter.

I believe innate talents or gifts do exist, especially for art. Someone I know was always good at drawing and painting, as far back as I knew them. They practice still, but even before all the practice they were better at it than most first timers.
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Posted 3/22/14
I think some people learn things faster than others because it's just something that feels more natural to them, while others have to work a lot harder. It is unfair, and that's how life life is. Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, but if people were truly passionate about their work, they wouldn't give up. This is what I think anyways.
Posted 3/22/14

Phersu wrote:

First of all, let me start by saying this is in the general discussion as it is not asking about art advice or an artist's perspective. I want the perspective of people who aren't artists. Who don't draw. Because they don't want to or believe they can't. So I appreciate if you didn't move this or think it is in the wrong section.

Now, my question is rather simple.

Do you think drawing, learning how to draw, being an artist, is something your born with or is it teachable? Or rather, can someone without some innate art talent learn how to be an artist
?

Discuss.




yes... as long as you have the passion for it...
Posted 3/22/14 , edited 3/22/14
all an artist needs is inspiration... ability to digest ideas and then communicate that idea through a medium.


it's not rocket science...


but if you want to become the composer that can move billions of people with a composition... then that might be a different story, might need both innate talent, passion and dedication.

but if you just want to express yourself and be able to appreciate your own art... then anybody can do it...
Bavalt 
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Posted 3/22/14
Some perspective here:

I have artistic talent. My art teachers in school were always impressed by how well I could transfer something from sight to a page, and how often I'd fluke into getting things right without being taught how to. Like a lot of school subjects, I excelled in art without having to try because I grasped it intuitively, and my art teachers were always encouraging me to keep it up and make something of it.

But I didn't. I'd draw maybe every couple months, usually at someone else's request, and while yes, my work is still pretty good, and I do show signs of improvement whenever I pick up the pencil again, I'm worlds apart from the people who have actually put in the work. The only thing I can work with is pencils. I didn't have the patience to get the hang of painting - I didn't like how the brush didn't exactly follow my hand movements. I don't know the first thing about digital art - learning how to navigate the programs required was boring. I can roughly draw something from memory or imagination and have it look decent, but by no means do I have any of the complex anatomical or physical knowledge that a practiced artist would have. I can tell when something looks good, and why it does, but I can't replicate it.

My point is that yes, there are people who have an intuitive grasp of how art works, but the process of creating masterful art is far too complex and involved for someone to just sit down and do naturally. It takes time to learn different mediums, and it takes varied experience to be able to achieve the level of mastery you need to actually make a name for yourself. Artistic sense itself is a talent, but producing art is a process that requires a number of different talents if you want to do it well, and while hypothetically, someone could have all of those talents, such a person would be an extreme rarity. In almost all cases, you're going to need to put in the work, because there's going to be something there that won't just click with you. Being naturally good at something is an advantage, but it's not a victory, and it seems to me that a lot of people who do have natural talent do exactly what I did with mine: pat themselves on the back and leave it at that, thinking that's all there is to it. They take a nap and allow the hardworking tortoises of the world to pass them, and end up giving up because they don't know how to apply themselves. Having gone through what I have, I absolutely believe that effort is a much bigger factor than talent when it comes down to it.
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Posted 3/22/14
Talent is a combination of even smaller talents, some of which may not even be talents and are skills that can be learned. It's way too complex.

Besides that, the 10,000 hour estimate it takes to reach grandmaster level at something is fairly accurate. Even if you have zero talent, you can reach levels where you can easily fool almost anyone into thinking you have immense talent with enough serious hours. Hours, not years or even days is what counts.

A person makes the most progress within the first 20 or so hours of effective practice so I suppose it would be easy to exaggerate the learning curves between people. This is also known as the Pareto principle. After that phase, the improvement curve takes a major dip and it becomes much harder to tell the difference between peoples' skills.
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