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Post Reply My favorite psychological and/or philosophical anime is___________
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Posted 3/27/14

Insomnist wrote:


windsagio wrote:

There's no actual philosophy there, just 'deep sounding stuff'.

Edit: If you're trolling me, I don't wanna hear about it ><

Not trolling, and I don't want to hear "that's just keep sounding stuff" on a page where Psycho-Pass has been mentioned five times alongside Ergo Proxy. Thank God nobody's said Fate/Zero yet. And of course there's Code Geass.

It's all just "deep sounding stuff" when you get to it, what matters is if it empowers viewer agency. And Neon Genesis Evangelion does (along with Psycho-Pass, Ergo Proxy, Fate/Zero, and Code Geass, for the record).

Ergo, the answers to this thread will be very personal.

    "Is it very natural that when we have gone through the ordered movements which a great play or narrative excites in us...it should suggest to us many interesting reflections. We have 'put on mental muscle' as a result of this activity. We may thank Shakespeare or Dante for that muscle, but we had better not father on them the philosophical or ethical use we make of it. ... Thus increasingly we meet only ourselves."

      C.S. Lewis, from An Experiment In Criticism (1968). Pages 84-85.

There's also a great short video related to this that iblessall showed me a week or so back on the PBS Idea Channel on Youtube about authorial intent: "Does It Matter What Evangelion's Creator Says?".

I'll also support Serial Experiments Lain and add Casshern Sins (Edit: nevermind, xxJing beat me to it).


While a person will see a work through their own filters and knowledge I think there is a difference between something that inspires one to ponder and something that communicates an idea.

IMO, Evangelion seemed like it was about lay down some philosophy, but it became clear at the end that the author didn't really have anything to confibute. He was probably intrigued by the idea of a singularity, but didn't really have anything to say about it. It had the trappings of philosophical content, but didn't really contain any philosophy.

Serial Experiment Lain seem to me nothing more than obsfucation for the purpose of seeming deep.

Much of Hayo Miyazaki's work actually has substantive content. Miyazaki has something to say, and he says it. What a viewer gets from it is, of course, dependent on the viewer's knowledge, intelligence, and beliefs, but there is actually something there to get.
Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14
Probibably either Serial Experiments Lain, Haibane Renmei, or Fractale.

Actually, does xXxHolic count? If so, then I might say xXxholic... I think if i'm honest, that's my favorite in the genre (if it counts)
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Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14

seekerperson7 wrote:

Probibably either Serial Experiments Lain, Haibane Renmei, or Fractale.

Actually, does xXxHolic count? If so, then I might say xXxholic... I think if i'm honest, that's my favorite in the genre (if it counts)


If those shows are your favorites then list those shows down.
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Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14

KimagureKappa wrote:

While a person will see a work through their own filters and knowledge I think there is a difference between something that inspires one to ponder and something that communicates an idea.

IMO, Evangelion seemed like it was about lay down some philosophy, but it became clear at the end that the author didn't really have anything to confibute. He was probably intrigued by the idea of a singularity, but didn't really have anything to say about it. It had the trappings of philosophical content, but didn't really contain any philosophy.

Serial Experiment Lain seem to me nothing more than obsfucation for the purpose of seeming deep.

Much of Hayo Miyazaki's work actually has substantive content. Miyazaki has something to say, and he says it. What a viewer gets from it is, of course, dependent on the viewer's knowledge, intelligence, and beliefs, but there is actually something there to get.

I'll extend the quote because I might've left out something pretty relevant.

In doing so I don't intend to name-drop excessively, and to say everyone should agree because C.S. Lewis said it. It's just something that's recently informed my thinking, and I think I can best express it though quotes.

These are just ideas and concepts that are occupying my thoughts quite a bit lately, and I'd like to discuss.

    "... Thus increasingly we meet only ourselves.

    "But one of the chief operations of art is to remove our gaze from that mirrored face, to deliver us from that solitude. When we read the 'literature of knowledge' we hope, as a result, to think more correctly and clearly. In reading imaginative work, I suggest, we should be much less concerned with altering our own opinions--though this of course is sometimes their effect--than with entering fully into the opinions, and therefore also the attitudes, feelings, and total experience, of other men. Who in his ordinary senses would try to decide between the claims of materialism and theism by reading Lucretius and Dante? But who in his literary senses would not delightedly learn from them a great deal about what it is like to be a materialist or a theist?

    [....]

    "The sort of misreading I here protest against is unfortunately encouraged by the increasing importance of 'English Literature' as an academic discipline. This directs to the study of literature a great many talented, ingenious, and diligent people whose real interests are not specifically literary at all. Forced to talk incessantly about books, what can they do but try to make books into the sort of things they can talk about? Hence literature becomes for them a religion, a philosophy, a school of ethics, a psychotherapy, a sociology--anything rather than a collection of works of art.

    [....]

    "This is not to say that all critics who extract such a philosophy from their favourite novelists or poets produce work without value: Each attributes to his chosen author what he believes to be wisdom; and the sort of thing that seems to him wise will of course be determined by his own calibre. If he is a fool he will find and admire foolishness, if he is a mediocrity, platitude, in all his favourites. But if he is a profound thinker himself, what he acclaims and expounds as his author's philosophy may be well worth reading, even if it is in reality his own. We may compare him to the long succession of divines who have based edifying and eloquent sermons on some straining of their texts. The sermon, though bad exegesis, was often good homiletics in its own right."

      C.S. Lewis, from An Experiment In Criticism (1968). Pages 85-86, 86, & 87).

I don't think he's saying that there's nothing to Shakespeare, Lucretius or Dante, only that fiction is a "conversation between an author and a reader" and not any kind of source of the truth of the universe. And that when we think we've found one, we're mostly fooling ourselves through a sort of self-affirmation bias.

But I've just been chewing on this, and occasionally pestering iblessall in PMs about incessantly.

So here I'm like "Omgosh, a conversation opportunity!" *pounce*
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Posted 3/27/14
Heh. I think i prefer the "psychological" side of this genre. First thing i'd think of is Shin Sekai Yori and maybe Psycho-Pass, among other things that are mentioned.

It's crazy though, pretty much everything I haven't watched that people have mentioned is in my PTW list.
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Posted 3/27/14

mangaviolet wrote:

Heh. I think i prefer the "psychological" side of this genre. First thing i'd think of is Shin Sekai Yori and maybe Psycho-Pass, among other things that are mentioned.

It's crazy though, pretty much everything I haven't watched that people have mentioned is in my PTW list.


PTW?
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Posted 3/27/14

qualeshia3 wrote:


mangaviolet wrote:

Heh. I think i prefer the "psychological" side of this genre. First thing i'd think of is Shin Sekai Yori and maybe Psycho-Pass, among other things that are mentioned.

It's crazy though, pretty much everything I haven't watched that people have mentioned is in my PTW list.


PTW?


Plan to watch Im guessing
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Posted 3/27/14


What about "Prime Time Watch"?
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Posted 3/27/14

qualeshia3 wrote:



What about "Prime Time Watch"?


My guess seems more likely. lol
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Posted 3/27/14



Ah, I see.

Sogno- 
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Posted 3/27/14
idk, maybe Code Geass? it sure messed up my mind lol
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Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14
Ooo I got two reference credits in three pages. #solegit

Also, Fate/Zero is the deepest, most compelling anime ever made. True story.





#threadhijack


You want to know my real answers?

Blast of Tempest, Toradora!, Angel Beats!, Gurren Lagann, The Devil is a Part-Timer!, Black Rock Shooter and now Silver Spoon.

I'm not trolling this time. I'm truly dead serious.

Philosophical isn't just a mind screw. There are all types of philosophies, and like Insomnist said, this thread is going to be highly personal.

Those anime I just listed preach philosophies that I espouse and can promote.
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Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14

iblessall wrote:

Ooo I got two reference credits in three pages. #solegit

Also, Fate/Zero is the deepest, most compelling anime ever made. True story.





#threadhijack


You want to know my real answers?

Blast of Tempest, Toradora!, Angel Beats!, Gurren Lagann, The Devil is a Part-Timer!, Black Rock Shooter and now Silver Spoon.

I'm not trolling this time.


The only ones that really fit is Blast of Tempest, and lesser Toradora for purely psych part of title of thread - due to its look at self and also relationship psych.

Sorry that sounded rude...didnt mean to be. I meant it more out of how I viewed it.
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Posted 3/27/14 , edited 3/27/14

Insomnist wrote:



Well, the issue is that the point is being used to imply that just about anything is philosophical if it provokes thought, and worse that to truly experience a work you need to submerge yourself it it's viewpoint.

It's a very Lewis-esque position to take, but it's a direct attack on the whole concept of literary criticism.

The whole game is to analyze the content for themes and narratives and to extrapolate what it actually means. If you go by the proposed method above, you'll never get past (perceived) authorial intent.
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Posted 3/27/14

Sacae89 wrote:
The only ones that really fit is Blast of Tempest, and lesser Toradora for purely psych part of title of thread - due to its look at self and also relationship psych.

You're right in a sense, but what I'm doing is essentially disagreeing with the idea that "psychological/philosophical" can be a genre.

Every anime has explore psychology of the characters and ever show has its own philosophy that it promotes.

So, in that sense, all anime is psychological and philosophical, and thus my answers here are the same as my answers to what my favorite anime are.
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