First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Japan, Anime & Rest of the world
Posted 5/20/14

plaidypuss wrote:


Jnax wrote:

japanese artists wanting to share their art with the world, fair enough. But on the other hand, anime is starting to become less "japanese" and more of a "worldwide" thing.
From what i have a observed so far: The anime community, identifies them selfs as japanese animation fans and thus so
anime art created by the community or otherwise "outside of japan" is not real anime but japanese/anime influenced art. This implies that everyone who watches anime outside of japan is nothing more than a recipient of japanese culture. Thats not a win-win relationship.

You like japanese pop culture?
no? i like anime. fuck japan.


Just posting a simple edit, this thread is complete bs. I was basicly trying to force some kind of made-up agenda that i was attached to after being influenced by some negative articles and point of veiws around the web. So i started to hate on japanese marketing
.


"Anime" and "manga" are Japanese terms, so it would make sense for them to be Japanese. I am not sure what the OP is complaining about. Anime is a product of Japanese culture. It's a product made by Japanese creators for a Japanese market (with production work in Korea since about forever and Viet Nam of late). As such, it would make sense for it to be relate-able to a Japanese market by being "Japanese." Japan has an insular/isolationist approach anyway, so it isn't like there are many overtures to make anime a global phenomenon.

As a counterpoint, rock n' roll and dance music were originally American born in African American communities, then went global and lost their roots. I don't know if either is better for it. Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Bo Didley, Frankie Knuckles, Derrick May and Juan Atkins are easily forgotten. Are the musical forms better for the globalization? I would argue that they aren't.

I don't think Anime or manga will ever be global because of how businesses approach them; non-Japanese people using that "style" will only be viewed as mimicking the Japanese. I put a submission in to Dark Horse Comics back in the late '90s when I was still young and had dreams and got shot down for having an "Anime-style" that was booming at the time (this was back when Adam Warren was starting to gain a following). I had myself a deflating and depressing laugh; being born in Japan to a Japanese mother and being raised on Doraemon, Jyarinko Chie and Pa-man, what else would inform my style?

And, not to try and negate everything the OP stated, most of the culturally significant/mainstream titles (as far as Japan is concerned) didn't go global (or at least to an American market), like:
GeGeGe no Kitarou
Doraemon
Sazae-san
Touch
Chibi Maruko-chan
Jyarinko Chie
Atashinchi
Kamui Gaiden
Dokaben
Tensai Bakabon
Ikyu-san
Captain Tsubasa
Hatori-kun

This is because distributors know their markets and know that with a niche market of people fashioning themselves as "otaku," they will gravitate toward certain formulas, so you get the cookie-cutter light novel adaptions, so don't feel bad, OP (and others suffering the butthurt over anime being too Japanese). It could be worse for you all if distributors based their selections off Japanese market tendencies and not their own country's.





So lets see if i understand you,
Some people who watch "japanese animation" complains about it being too japanese.
Dark Horse Comics, (i'm guessing) some anime related work went out of business, which disappointed you in your childhood.
And Marketers will not sell certain formulas in animation to certaint contries.
did i understand you?
Posted 5/20/14 , edited 6/3/14

RedExodus wrote:

Outbreak Company anyone? This anime is about teaching foreigners to be otakus and encouraging them to make their own anime.


This is true.
72836 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Central KY.
Offline
Posted 5/20/14

JayVeeDees wrote:

haha, to be honest, I don't want this to become more popular than it already is xD It is very selfish of me yes, but I feel like I'm apart of something special when we are the minority that watch something that everyone else can't stand, which makes it just that much more fun :P


This right here...I too know it's selfish, but so what.
17434 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
36 / M / Oregon
Offline
Posted 5/20/14

Jnax wrote:


plaidypuss wrote:


Jnax wrote:

japanese artists wanting to share their art with the world, fair enough. But on the other hand, anime is starting to become less "japanese" and more of a "worldwide" thing.
From what i have a observed so far: The anime community, identifies them selfs as japanese animation fans and thus so
anime art created by the community or otherwise "outside of japan" is not real anime but japanese/anime influenced art. This implies that everyone who watches anime outside of japan is nothing more than a recipient of japanese culture. Thats not a win-win relationship.

You like japanese pop culture?
no? i like anime. fuck japan.


Just posting a simple edit, this thread is complete bs. I was basicly trying to force some kind of made-up agenda that i was attached to after being influenced by some negative articles and point of veiws around the web. So i started to hate on japanese marketing
.


"Anime" and "manga" are Japanese terms, so it would make sense for them to be Japanese. I am not sure what the OP is complaining about. Anime is a product of Japanese culture. It's a product made by Japanese creators for a Japanese market (with production work in Korea since about forever and Viet Nam of late). As such, it would make sense for it to be relate-able to a Japanese market by being "Japanese." Japan has an insular/isolationist approach anyway, so it isn't like there are many overtures to make anime a global phenomenon.

As a counterpoint, rock n' roll and dance music were originally American born in African American communities, then went global and lost their roots. I don't know if either is better for it. Little Richard, Chuck Berry, Bo Didley, Frankie Knuckles, Derrick May and Juan Atkins are easily forgotten. Are the musical forms better for the globalization? I would argue that they aren't.

I don't think Anime or manga will ever be global because of how businesses approach them; non-Japanese people using that "style" will only be viewed as mimicking the Japanese. I put a submission in to Dark Horse Comics back in the late '90s when I was still young and had dreams and got shot down for having an "Anime-style" that was booming at the time (this was back when Adam Warren was starting to gain a following). I had myself a deflating and depressing laugh; being born in Japan to a Japanese mother and being raised on Doraemon, Jyarinko Chie and Pa-man, what else would inform my style?

And, not to try and negate everything the OP stated, most of the culturally significant/mainstream titles (as far as Japan is concerned) didn't go global (or at least to an American market), like:
GeGeGe no Kitarou
Doraemon
Sazae-san
Touch
Chibi Maruko-chan
Jyarinko Chie
Atashinchi
Kamui Gaiden
Dokaben
Tensai Bakabon
Ikyu-san
Captain Tsubasa
Hatori-kun

This is because distributors know their markets and know that with a niche market of people fashioning themselves as "otaku," they will gravitate toward certain formulas, so you get the cookie-cutter light novel adaptions, so don't feel bad, OP (and others suffering the butthurt over anime being too Japanese). It could be worse for you all if distributors based their selections off Japanese market tendencies and not their own country's.





So lets see if i understand you,
Some people who watch "japanese animation" complains about it being too japanese.
Dark Horse Comics, (i'm guessing) some anime related work went out of business, which disappointed you in your childhood.
And Marketers will not sell certain formulas in animation to certaint contries.
did i understand you?


For the most part yes, except for the part about Dark Horse Comics. They are still quite in business; they just turned me down for my drawing style, which hurt at the time. I was young and thought I was someone of consequence back then. Life has since been kind enough to remind me rather consistently that I ain't shit. Those reminders keep me level-headed.
One Punch Mod
85837 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F / Boston-ish
Offline
Posted 6/7/14
Closed since OP nuked
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.