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23 / M / side 6
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Posted 4/5/14
im planing to go linux but no clue which one to go to.
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Yo Mama's House
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Posted 4/5/14 , edited 4/5/14

Dcflame wrote:

im planing to go linux but no clue which one to go to.


For basic use, Ubuntu is good for a person switching from Windows or Apple.

If you're a bit advance, you can check out distros like Mint or Debian.

I personally use Ubuntu for crunchyroll and paperwork and banking. It serves pretty well to everyday use.
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Posted 4/6/14 , edited 4/6/14
+1 On Ubuntu or Mint

Both of them try to make it as easy as possible. Ubuntu 14.04 should be an easy switch from Windows. Most drivers are pre-installed so you won't have to deal with it.

Just do these and it will be a lot more like what you're most likely used to

http://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2014/02/locally-integrated-menus-ubuntu-14-04

http://ubuntuportal.com/2014/03/minimize-on-click-feature-for-unity-launcher-will-available-in-ubuntu-14-04.html

If your looking at any tutorial and it says to open a terminal you can hit ctrl-alt-t and it will open a terminal.
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Posted 4/6/14
Personally, if you're looking for ease of use right out of the box, I would say go with Linux Mint. Mint comes in three flavors (Cinnamon, Mate, and Xfce). Cinnamon is the one that the Mint team seems to pay the most attention to and which has the fewest hitches. Unbuntu is great too, and also offers a more innovative desktop. However, if you're switching OS's you might want to stick with something that handles a little bit more like a plain old computer rather than some table-computer-phone-future-something.

Just my too cents ... for what it's worth. Here's a link to the current download of Mint: http://www.linuxmint.com/download.php. Cinnamon is the first one listed. It comes with all the codecs and video software that might be proprietary installed by default.

Also, if you ever want to read up on any of the fifty-thousand flavors of Linux, DistroWatch is a good place to start your research: http://distrowatch.com/ Linux has come a long way, so no worries about taking the plunge!

Best of luck to you!
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Posted 18 days ago
Go with Ubuntu. This distribution has a great GUI and lots of good resource online that can help you get started:

http://linux-bible.com - general Linux tutorial
http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu_Trusty - Ubuntu guide
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Posted 16 days ago
Without knowing the level of Linux experience of the user, the hardware that is going to be used, and how they plan to use the machine it's hard to give a qualified recommendation.

Ubuntu is going to be the easiest for the person with little or no experience with Linux. The desktop may be a little different if your coming from a Windows environment but the driver support, and available help and documentation is well above most other distros. A quick Google search usually pulls up a wealth of information about most issues.

Mint would be the next step. It's probably not going to be much harder in terms of setup, as someone else noted, the desktop feels a little more like a traditional desktop. I think the support resources for Mint are a little thinner than Ubuntu and you'll end up having to Google a bit more often.

Beyond that I would recommend Gentoo for the more advanced user or the quicker learners. This distro and especially it's Portage package management system allows for a lot of customization. Support is still pretty good too but probably a little less for the person looking for a simple walk-through tutorial. This is my choice for the person really looking to learn to be a Linux power user.
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Posted 14 days ago
You can try Ubuntu or Mint, check both out for screenshots, etc. For hardware you can load a Live CD and use the OS without installing it and verify if most hardware will work. Usually Wireless if the biggest issue. Don't be surprised to see some issues but that's much less than in the past. It's worth a shot IMO. If you have the space you could also dual boot along side your current OS before permanently installing.

PS - No matter what you do make sure you have proper backups of everything important.
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