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Post Reply why do some people take very long at the General Practitioner?
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 4/8/14 , edited 4/8/14
I don't mean that in an arrogant way. genuinely curious about why some people take very long? (up to 1hour)...

I can take a wild guess and think maybe they have some sort of serious disease and need extra info...

Question #2: How long, on average, do you usually take when consulting a GP?


Personally, I take 5-10minutes at most. I just need the prescription and then I GTFO.
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28 / M / Toledo
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Posted 4/8/14 , edited 4/8/14
For my disease I have to go to a specialist and even then the actual time I spend talking to the doctors is very minimal. The waiting is usually done on my end for them to take me back and then come to the room and then release me etc.

I only recently got insurance so I haven't ever really gone to a general practitioner. The only times, other than my regular appointments with the specialist, that I have needed to go see a doctor for was when something bad happened and so I went to an urgent care center. Those times I still didn't take very long. I don't bother asking questions really so I just get the info required and leave.

When people take a long time I just automatically assume it is the doctor that is making it take as long as it does since sometimes I have to wait a half hour or more even when I am already back in the room. That's just my experience with it though.
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M
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Posted 4/8/14
I'm in the US, it's not up to the patient how long we wait.
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32 / M
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Posted 4/8/14
It could the doctor hasn't yet established what it is that ails the patient, in which case there would probably be lots of questions being asked.
It could be that the doctor has a lot to explain to the patient and the patient then has questions.
It could be that the patient or the doctor just aren't very organized or to the point.
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Posted 4/8/14
We like here
Posted 4/8/14 , edited 4/8/14

GayAsianBoy wrote:

I don't mean that in an arrogant way. genuinely curious about why some people take very long? (up to 1hour)...

I can take a wild guess and think maybe they have some sort of serious disease and need extra info...

Question #2: How long, on average, do you usually take when consulting a GP?


Personally, I take 5-10minutes at most. I just need the prescription and then I GTFO.


It depends on whos going in, I am a medical assistant. You see the General Doctor for any issues. If it is a yearly check up some people have to list out their families history diseases, cancers, surgeries. Also If you do have family history of any cancers or diseases they want labs done. Patients also go into see the Doctor to get a referral to see a Specialist. I myself have to see a General Doctor to see an OBGYN because I have Endometriosis which my grandma on my dads side had, my mom and my aunt.... so my appts are longer because of that i need labs and they ask alot of questions....... Elderly patients and younger patients take the longest because they have more questions and concerns. Also the medical assistants always go in first and questions before hand or prep you for your labs or shots and also the Doctor can be running behind because they need to sign off on something or finish paperwork or answering patients questions.

So typically it takes a good 30 mins to an hour or even longer depending of the patient.
Sogno- 
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Posted 4/8/14

mlchanges wrote:

I'm in the US, it's not up to the patient how long we wait.


even if you have an appointment
Posted 4/8/14

Sogno- wrote:


mlchanges wrote:

I'm in the US, it's not up to the patient how long we wait.


even if you have an appointment


that happens alot, it all depends on the patient ahead of you.
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Posted 4/8/14
Hey, some people are hypochondriac. They want to know that isn't there.

Not to mention, for old people, you have to make sure they know what they're taking or what they're going up to. So, they have to explain things to them more than twice. Confused old people would just say "yes" on everything.

Hospital is a scary place and some people get intimidated on their doctors. It's called the "white coat syndrome."
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Posted 4/8/14
Hi, I'm a medical student, and I can give a few examples of what could hold up a conversation. Some patients talk a lot and give you lots of information. This is a blessing and a curse, because you're likely to get the whole story but it will take a long time and you have to guide the consultation with a firm hand. Alternatively, a patient could present with a certain symptom, like a headache, which can be caused by a huge number of things, so it may require a lot of discussion, then only towards the end mention a symptom they find embarrassing, like incontinence, blood in poo or urine, or even loss of balance (which implies some loss of independence for them). This changes the focus of the consult in a huge way, and has to be talked out. Some others on this thread have mentioned a serious illness taking a long time. It is more likely that the patient has multiple conditions affecting the consult length. For example, kidney, heart and liver problems tend to affect each other. As another example, diabetes (a systemic disease with cause focussed in the pancreas) can affect the brain, eyes, kidneys, heart, legs/balance (decreased sensation in extremities). A good diabetes check up would include a medication review of all these, and tests to see if the disease has progressed in these areas. Also, obesity, smoking and alcohol complicates almost all disease, but a good doctor would approach these subject tactfully in some patients, which takes time. Obesity and sometimes smoking also makes blood tests much more difficult, because the veins are difficult to find.
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27 / M / Tim Allen's belly...
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Posted 4/8/14
3min tops for a diagnosis, then we play checkers for the next hour :D

TRUTH FOUND!
Posted 4/9/14
Do they? Never noticed.
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25 / M / Sydney, Australia
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Posted 4/9/14 , edited 4/9/14

hainsay wrote:

Hi, I'm a medical student, and I can give a few examples of what could hold up a conversation. Some patients talk a lot and give you lots of information. This is a blessing and a curse, because you're likely to get the whole story but it will take a long time and you have to guide the consultation with a firm hand. Alternatively, a patient could present with a certain symptom, like a headache, which can be caused by a huge number of things, so it may require a lot of discussion, then only towards the end mention a symptom they find embarrassing, like incontinence, blood in poo or urine, or even loss of balance (which implies some loss of independence for them). This changes the focus of the consult in a huge way, and has to be talked out. Some others on this thread have mentioned a serious illness taking a long time. It is more likely that the patient has multiple conditions affecting the consult length. For example, kidney, heart and liver problems tend to affect each other. As another example, diabetes (a systemic disease with cause focussed in the pancreas) can affect the brain, eyes, kidneys, heart, legs/balance (decreased sensation in extremities). A good diabetes check up would include a medication review of all these, and tests to see if the disease has progressed in these areas. Also, obesity, smoking and alcohol complicates almost all disease, but a good doctor would approach these subject tactfully in some patients, which takes time. Obesity and sometimes smoking also makes blood tests much more difficult, because the veins are difficult to find.


I personally find it embarrassing when doctors ask me sexual related stuff



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32 / M / Midwestern United...
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Posted 4/9/14

GayAsianBoy wrote Personally, I take 5-10minutes at most. I just need the prescription and then I GTFO.


Sure that is a good policy? Doesn't seem wise to rush your health.
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Posted 4/9/14
Curiosity. Details, details, details.
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