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25 / F / Melksham, Wiltshi...
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Posted 4/18/14
I'm from the UK (England specifically - South West England more specifically).

It rains a lot;


We're also very diverse, you probably can't pinpoint the accent, it changes dramatically every few miles.
Mine is apparently quite neutral but I've developed a Wiltshire lilt.

With the growth of globalisation there has been some discussion about what makes us British but I think it's our ability to absorb other cultures; our language for example has French and Germanic roots (and many other I'm sure). We also have a self-deprecating sense of humour and the funniest jokes are about things that we can recognize within ourselves and our families (though that might just be me); just look at Michael McIntyre's Hoovering or Man Drawer routines.

I first thought that the anime fandom was very small in the UK but almost as soon as I'm mention that I like anime - people suddenly open up that they like it too; people I've known for years have been avidly watching anime and I had no clue.
I think that's because a lot of people a quite judgmental but also because their first thought is either of the children's shows or of Hentai. I'm working to fix that of course.

I'd say the UK has a bit of everything - you just have to look in the right regions.
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21 / F / Balmer, Murlin
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Posted 4/18/14
The USA is a huge mash-up of all sorts of different cultures. Many countries are, but I think the US especially covers a wide breadth of people. So, summing up the entirety of the United States is an overwhelmingly difficult task. Nigh impossible.

Instead, I will focus on my home state of Maryland.

(I wrote a lot more than I thought I would, so I spoiler tagged it for your convenience.)

Food culture:


Historical culture:


Geography:


Random trivia:
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24 / F / Johnstown, PA, USA
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Posted 4/18/14 , edited 4/18/14
Dairy farm in Martinsburg, PA:

My maternal grandparents used to live on that farm, though it used to look quite different. This is of the new owners' transformation of the place. There is a dead cherry orchard in view, behind the farm. The street runs right by it.
Martinsburg is a rural town, known for Mennonites, Amish, nearby apple and peach orchards, the local farms, and a high population of wild rabbits that terrorize vegetable gardens. Amish and Mennonite goods, particularly Amish craftmanship, are known for being rustic and of good/great quality. You will often see local Amish traveling the roads by bike and buggies. The most of the fine-looking horses that the Amish use are retired race horses. Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites have their own special German dialect as their first language, called Pennsylvania Dutch/Pennsylvania German. There is a cute independent cafe/bakery in the middle of Martinsburg that I like.

Photo of a view seen from Johnstown's Incline Plane, which I scoured Google for.

"Built after the Johnstown flood of 1889, the Inclined Plane's original purpose was to connect downtown with the higher grounds of Westmont Borough in order to develop that area residentially. During Johnstown's two other floods in 1936 and 1977, the Incline became a lifesaver, helping people to escape downtown as well as to ship supplies into the valley.
In its heyday, the Incline carried approximately 1,000,000 passengers a year to and from the downtown area. This was larely due to the steel mills that were in operation. Today the Incline welcomes visitors and locals alike, carrying approximately 100,000 passengers a year.
The Johnstown Inclined Plane is the steepest vehicular incline in the world, meaning its 30' cars, which are large enough to hold 60 people, 6 motorcycles, or a vehicle, travel at the steepest grade for cars their size.
"

There is a wonderful Tuscan Italian restaurant at the top of the plane, called Asiago's.
Aside from the incline, Johnstown's is historically known for the aforementioned and debilitating floods of 1889, 1936, and 1977. There is a memorial bridge that honors the casualties. There is also a flood museum. Lesser known is a local mountain spring and the yearly Thunder in the Valley motorcycle rally. Also, the Greater Johnstown High School is known as the third in the nation. Johnstown was once the leading steel producer in the country, with the immediate years following WWII marking the peak years of the city being a steel maker and fabricator.
Some interesting information that I snagged from Wikipedia:


I also want to give a shout-out to Family Heirloom Weavers of Red Lion, PA (Google-found image):

"One of the last surviving U.S. textile mills; Our small family owned and operated business makes good use of old, outdated power looms, though the setups are still painstakingly done by hand. Can you imagine threading over a thousand heddles (needles) in one day?
We reproduce original designs from the 18th and 19th centuries and adapt them for 21st century use. Since 1983, we have continued to grow a workforce that is comprised of 25 employees operating over 40 antique looms. Our work can be seen at many historic sites - including nine Presidential homes, museums and Colonial Williamsburg.
Hollywood has called on Family Heirloom Weavers to produce material used in several movies such as Gettysburg, Gods and Generals, Cold Mountain, Jonah Hex, Cowboys & Aliens and Abraham Lincoln/Vampire Hunter and the most recent - Spielberg's Lincoln.
"
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101 / M
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Posted 4/18/14 , edited 4/18/14

TheOmegaForce70941 wrote:

I don't know if anyone has made a thread like this before but... This should be a fun topic.

Share some information about the country you live in, if you have share some photos from it









Sweden is the most populated country in scandinavia, Sweden is also a part of the EU.

Sweden have a history of building and designing things and this to me is a one of the big reasons why companies such as IKEA is swedish, as well as one of the reasons of why games like Minecraft is swedish. In Minecraft you go out and explore/collect/build stuff from your imagination.


I envy you for having lots of hot women in Sweden
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20 / M / Sweden
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Posted 4/18/14

Chofrizzy wrote:


TheOmegaForce70941 wrote:

I don't know if anyone has made a thread like this before but... This should be a fun topic.

Share some information about the country you live in, if you have share some photos from it









Sweden is the most populated country in scandinavia, Sweden is also a part of the EU.

Sweden have a history of building and designing things and this to me is a one of the big reasons why companies such as IKEA is swedish, as well as one of the reasons of why games like Minecraft is swedish. In Minecraft you go out and explore/collect/build stuff from your imagination.


I envy you for having lots of hot women in Sweden :(


Believe me, that's just a stereotype.

Also, asians are 10 times hotter!
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27 / F
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Posted 4/18/14 , edited 4/18/14
The US is big and everyone knows about it, so I guess I can say something about my hometown. I'm from Seattle, Washington.

It does rain a lot here, or rather, it rains often. New York actually gets more inches of rain. But the weather is actually pretty great and this is what it can be like:



People in this area are pretty outdoorsy. In the city there are some really great parks, and the mountains are close enough for hiking or skiing. And of course there is Mt. Rainier, in the picture. There are two large lakes (Lake Washington and Lake Union) and some smaller ones inside the city, along with Puget Sound, so there are plenty of beaches and boating opportunities. Whenever the sun comes out everyone goes crazy and goes outside to have fun.

The city is very hilly and I guess there are 650 public staircases. Basically, there will be a few blocks where a hill was too steep for a street so they made it into stairs. It can make driving around interesting. That and all the water make continuous straight roads something of an oddity.

I think Seattle is the most Godless city in the US (most people identifying as atheist). People are also notorious for being cold and polite. People who move here complain that it is hard to make friends. They call it the 'Seattle Freeze'. I think people here are generally just a bit reserved, but it is true that most of my friends are people I have known since elementary school.

Seattle is home to some famous companies. Starbucks was founded here. So was Nordstrom. Microsoft is over in Redmond (on the other side of Lake Washington). Amazon is building tons of stuff just north of downtown by Lake Union. And Boeing is also a local company.

The city is extremely liberal. Seattle is the only city in the US to have a socialist on the city council. The city is the big reason that Washington State now has gay marriage and has legalized marijuana.

In a larger context, Seattle is part of a general cultural area that includes San Francisco, Portland, and Vancouver, B.C. up in Canada. It's really a nice part of the world and I am very happy to live here.
Posted 11/2/14
New York City.

I've lived here my whole life. If you come here expecting the Hollywood fantasy of running around Times Square and eating pretzels...you might get it. Then mugged.

NYC is broken into 5 boroughs. Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, The Bronx, and Staten Island. Manhattan is the financial center of the world. Queens has representation for every language spoken in the world and is the most ethnically diverse area in the world. Brooklyn is hipsters, but diverse and nice. The Bronx is not very nice, but getting better, and Staten Island is the suburbs.

Personally, my favorite place in NYC is Chinatown. I've gone there so many times in my life, and I never, ever get bored of it. It's absolutely amazing. You can buy a chicken on one block and traditional Chinese weaponry on another.




My neighborhood is almost half immigrant, and well over half of that half is Asian. That might explain my undying affinity to Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, and other countries.

A lot of people say coming here makes them feel like they've left the US. And I agree. It's so diverse, you sometimes forget you're in America, but that's the beautiful thing, right?



If you come to NYC expecting kindness...I don't know what to tell you. I try and be kind, but there's an inherent attitude you need to survive here, and if you aren't equipped with it, you'll get trampled.

Keep in mind too, when visiting, there are homeless people on every block. Do not run away from them. I've seen this so many times it's not even funny. And also, keep all belonging in your pockets or bags or they will get taken.




Posted 11/2/14
this is a masterpiece that I'm always proud of... that my ancestors built.



The moat, the water lilies, the sculptures within in the walls, and the picture story murals along the walls form an intricate network that exudes exquisite and brilliant unity and artistic conformity .
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UK
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Posted 11/2/14 , edited 11/2/14
Two have already mentioned the UK. I live in large city of millions. It's old and it's expensive to live here. Here's some pics of places of interest.





Some markets



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19 / M / Cali
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Posted 11/2/14 , edited 11/2/14
Everybody in high school are dropping mixtapes - California Lyfe
For my Asian cultures.. everyone in my family has one of these in their household in between red lit candles



And this painting



I wouldn't feel like home if I didn't hear my parents watching those damn Cambodian soap operas and internet podcast.

Posted 11/2/14

narutosonic330 wrote:

but do you live in Cambodia? lol


no, but I was born there and lived there for the first 8 years. and it's still my first language. that's why I always forget my plurals/tenses in English, because in my language, plurals and tenses don't exist.



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19 / M / Cali
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Posted 11/2/14

GayAsianBoy wrote:


narutosonic330 wrote:

but do you live in Cambodia? lol


no, but I was born there and lived there for the first 8 years. and it's still my first language. that's why I always forget my plurals/tenses in English, because in my language, plurals and tenses don't exist.





Hahaha I still can't understand what my parents say sometimes. I remember going there and getting hecka mosquito bites on my legs. I was just chilling by the woods and sitting on a ledge until a bunch of ants crawled into my shirt and started biting me and all these crazy things happened.
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21 / M / Australia
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Posted 11/2/14
Australia; Beaches, booze, babes and giving everything a ridiculous name.
http://travel.ninemsn.com.au/holidaytype/weird/655118/a-z-of-unusual-australian-place-names
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21 / M / The Netherlands
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Posted 11/2/14
The Netherlands where most people arent even Dutch.
Posted 11/2/14

narutosonic330 wrote:
Hahaha I still can't understand what my parents say sometimes. I remember going there and getting hecka mosquito bites on my legs. I was just chilling by the woods and sitting on a ledge until a bunch of ants crawled into my shirt and started biting me and all these crazy things happened.


when i went there, had to sleep in mosquito-net tent every night. it's not safe to go out of the tent
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