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The Information Technology Professionals Thread.
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30 / M / Atlanta
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Posted 4/25/14
1. Built my own in high school and joined some IT class where all we did was play games. I got into the industry (after going to school for finance) when a guy took a chance on me with his startup and offered me a job based on the fact that I coached rowing where his kid had rowed. It was a data processing/ETL/BI company and that's where I got my start. I now am Partner in my own company where I serve as Solutions Architect.

2. Win 7/8 are fine by me. A more appropriate question for me is which database do I prefer. Most likely SQLServer for mid-size DB, redshift or greenplum for cloud. I despise Oracle and Teradata.

3. Fairy Tail, Code Geass, High School of the Dead.
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30 / M / Atlanta
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Posted 4/25/14

xeneria wrote:

This thread actually is perfect for me, because I have some questions regarding this. You guys care to answer my question?

I'm at the moment in high school, and after high school I want to study information technology. I want to know exactly what kind of subjects is there in IT and what do you learn? do you focus on one subject (let's say web designing), do you only focus on web designing or do you learn many different things like learning to make computer programs, network engineering and system developing?

Also what do you think of the difficulty of studying this? is it easy, normal or hard?



Personally I say don't study IT. IT education is horrible. It creates a lot of process oriented people that often lack quality critical thinking skills (not always obviously but this is something I've seen widespread in the industry working in it for quite some time and having done work for many of the fortune 100 companies). Study something business related, then teach yourself all you need to know for IT; that has paid off hugely in my career because I'm a "geek that speaks" and can bridge between business and IT. Fact is that IT skills often are out of date as soon as you learn them, or at least on their way out so you have to always be learning. Going to college for something that will be dated within a few years after you're out is pointless whereas business is much more static. If you have a passion for IT/technology it's easy to teach yourself as there are so many resources online to do so.

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/the-sorry-state-of-it-education/d/d-id/1204552

Great article on it ^. It outlines that companies don't educate their employees (so true in the IT industry) and that to truly get ahead you'll need to constantly be teaching yourself. Since you have to do that anyways, go study something that will maintain value over the course of your life.
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16 / M / Turn Around (Cali...
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Posted 4/26/14 , edited 4/26/14
1. I was really curious of how computers worked, just one day I was looking at it and I was like "hmm I wonder what goes on in there?" So it just so happens that my step brother was a huge techie and is actually going to work for Google. So I ask him a lot of questions about computers and I find out you can build computers yourself! That was 100% new news to me so I was overjoyed to hear this. As soon as I got the money from my bar-mitzvah I built myself a computer and I have been into learning, repairing, and building computers
2. I use Windows 8.1 and its ok I guess but I miss Windows 7... it has always seemed to be the best OS that I have used but I liked the quick loading Windows 8.1
3.
A. Attack on Titan
B. Sword Art Online
C. Kill la Kill
D. Code Geass
E. Gurren Lagann
Also Im not sure if Im a techie because Im not taking classes for it or anything but thats just because I dont have those type of classes at my school. Everything I know is self taught from Youtube channels like: Austin Evans, Linus Tech Tips, Tech Quickie, NCIX Tech Tips, Tech of Tomorrow, Review Tech USA, The Ben Heck Show etc...
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50 / M / Chicago, IL
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Posted 4/26/14
1. Looking back, the games and potential. I started in this in the early 80's. My first online experiences were BBS and Compuserve. I still remember the first time I downloaded an updated network card driver for work.
2. OS of choice, for what? For servers Windows Server 2008r2 for high value production machines and a limited use of Novell SUSE Linux for our eDirectory system. My personal server at work has Windows Server 2012 and more PowerShell scripts that you can shake a Pocky at. Desktops I like Windows 7 for desktop.
3. I like the slice of life series. Warm and enjoyable and the ones I have seen, you never see computers that much.
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19 / M
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Posted 4/26/14

LiquidMercury wrote:


xeneria wrote:

This thread actually is perfect for me, because I have some questions regarding this. You guys care to answer my question?

I'm at the moment in high school, and after high school I want to study information technology. I want to know exactly what kind of subjects is there in IT and what do you learn? do you focus on one subject (let's say web designing), do you only focus on web designing or do you learn many different things like learning to make computer programs, network engineering and system developing?

Also what do you think of the difficulty of studying this? is it easy, normal or hard?



Personally I say don't study IT. IT education is horrible. It creates a lot of process oriented people that often lack quality critical thinking skills (not always obviously but this is something I've seen widespread in the industry working in it for quite some time and having done work for many of the fortune 100 companies). Study something business related, then teach yourself all you need to know for IT; that has paid off hugely in my career because I'm a "geek that speaks" and can bridge between business and IT. Fact is that IT skills often are out of date as soon as you learn them, or at least on their way out so you have to always be learning. Going to college for something that will be dated within a few years after you're out is pointless whereas business is much more static. If you have a passion for IT/technology it's easy to teach yourself as there are so many resources online to do so.

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/the-sorry-state-of-it-education/d/d-id/1204552

Great article on it ^. It outlines that companies don't educate their employees (so true in the IT industry) and that to truly get ahead you'll need to constantly be teaching yourself. Since you have to do that anyways, go study something that will maintain value over the course of your life.

Thanks for bringing that up will look more into that.
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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/28/14


Ahhhh, yes. Dot matrix printers. That I am old enough to remember, despite my young age. For those who aren't 80s/90s kids: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_matrix_printing
http://vimeo.com/58200103

And yep, sci-fi is so boring these days. Nothing good to watch anymore. I'm re-watching SG1 and Atlantis right now. I was two when Stargate-SG1 aired, and my earliest memories are sitting on the floor in front of our living room couch watching it with my parents. Still the best sci-fi show to date. Anyhoos, peace, mate! And nice to meet ya'!-Mikael
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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/28/14


I will agree, although I love Mac OS for graphics and media work, that it is extremely non-friendly to IT guys. In our dept. we have a dude who ONLY works on Macs since we have so much trouble from them. And if we need to repair one, we just say, "fuck it" and get a new one since we don't want to take the time to work on it. And damn, I love Fedora, good choice of OS. Cheers, mate!-Mikael
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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/28/14

Nice! Props on your own company, man! We have Oracle here at my department (thanks to our idiot executives), I'd love to get them to switch to something else. What would you recommend as an alternative to Oracle? I'm still pretty new to databases.-Mikael
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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/28/14 , edited 4/28/14

Also Im not sure if Im a techie...


Not sure if you're a techie? Self taught? Hell yeah you're a techie! Self taught is the best way to go. I agree with LiquidMercury as to studying on your own, it's one of the best ways to learn and the only way you'll definitely stay up-to-date in your field. Start at your age learning as much as you can and you'll be gold by the time you get into the field. Only reason I'm going to school is 'cause I need the Bachelor's degree in network/computer engineering in order to land a job at Google, but other than that I've taught myself. Try looking around http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/, this place has tons of official, handy, and awesome knowledge and tricks to learn about Windows and computers. Cheers, mate!-Mikael
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30 / M / Atlanta
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Posted 4/29/14

iamahappymikael wrote:


Nice! Props on your own company, man! We have Oracle here at my department (thanks to our idiot executives), I'd love to get them to switch to something else. What would you recommend as an alternative to Oracle? I'm still pretty new to databases.-Mikael


So many things go into choosing a tool and i wouldn't ever give a recommendation without knowing the cost structure, the needs of the client, the environment requirements etc. etc. Certain tools for certain needs. I can tell you how I see things going though (or at least how they should be going) - cloud hybrid solutions. The majority of the data will be stored in a cloud tool such as greenplum, redshift, hadoop and then use a mid-size DB to extract the data from cloud into something more manageable that you can then use a BI tool to disperse information via various mediums.
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30 / M / Atlanta
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Posted 4/29/14

iamahappymikael wrote:


Also Im not sure if Im a techie...


Not sure if you're a techie? Self taught? Hell yeah you're a techie! Self taught is the best way to go. I agree with LiquidMercury as to studying on your own, it's one of the best ways to learn and the only way you'll definitely stay up-to-date in your field. Start at your age learning as much as you can and you'll be gold by the time you get into the field. Only reason I'm going to school is 'cause I need the Bachelor's degree in network/computer engineering in order to land a job at Google, but other than that I've taught myself. Try looking around http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/, this place has tons of official, handy, and awesome knowledge and tricks to learn about Windows and computers. Cheers, mate!-Mikael


What happens if you don't like google? (I'm playing devils advocate). I'm sure you'll be absolutely fine, but one thing I've realized is to never become dogmatic about a company, a tool, a technology and to constantly be expanding your knowledge base. For instance, you may get that job at google and end up realizing it's not a good fit. Do your plans allow for alternatives to google? CE is always a good degree and stands alone on it's own (one of the few degrees outside business that does so).

As it relates to education I'm a strong proponent of making sure whatever you do as an undergrad can get you a job. I've seen so many people go and get undergrad degrees in history/political science/literature/various liberal arts degrees with the intention of going and getting a masters but then they get sick of school so they don't get their masters and have a degree that is worthless without one.

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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/30/14


You raise a good point. All should take note that you may not like the company you work for. I've been there and one of the reasons I'm in my current job is because I disliked my last one. One of the first things I did before I decided on this career/degree was research the different types of businesses and companies I could possibly work for, local and abroad. As far as Network/Computer Engineering goes, alternatives to Google could be companies such as Amazon, Valve, Microsoft, Ebay, Facebook, almost any large university or community college (such as the one I'm working at now), and pretty much any company that needs a large server/network for their business needs. So if I don't like it at Google, there's tons of places to go. And networking isn't my only field of experience, thankfully, so I have my audio/visual, desktop support, and multimedia experience to fall back on in worst case scenarios. Devil's advocates are welcome in my book, man. It's always best to look at all the angles and possibilities before making such a big decision as a career.
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21 / M / The Universe, Mil...
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Posted 4/30/14


We just had a meeting recently where our director talked about doing something like that with our campus. We're waiting on a shipment of new thin client PCs from HP. This model, I believe: http://www8.hp.com/us/en/campaigns/thin-client-solutions/t610.html#tab-graphics-specs
We're going to go strictly could computing for the various classrooms/departments that don't need something more powerful (like information technology, CAD, multimedia, medical, etc), and all of the data, applications, etc will be drawn from the cloud, the OS will be a virtual machine and we can even push that as a virtual desktop to pretty much any of our employee's devices at home. I think we are using Redshift, but I can't remember.

It's pretty exciting to see how the cloud is advancing in technology and uses. I almost want to build my own home cloud for my backups/storage.
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17 / M / Wales
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Posted 4/30/14
Hello! I'm currently doing IT exams in school to get a career in the future.

1) What drew you to the field of computers/IT?
The way modern society is moving a lot of jobs are beginning to involve IT more and more, I want a god job and IT fits me well, I'm not good with any physical attributes so IT really stood out as a good career for me.

2) What is your OS of choice?
Windows 7/8- windows is the ideal OS to me because almost all companies where I come from use it including school.

3) anime: Steins;Gate Manga: Au No Exorcist Movie: the Steins;Gate movie TV show: Friends Book:Hamlet
Posted 5/9/14
1) What drew you to the field of computers/IT?
Not sure. I've always been attracted to technology,

2) What is your OS of choice?
Mac OS X. Never had any issues with it. Been using it for years so I'm used to all the shortcuts etc. Don't mind Ubuntu. Not a big fan of Windows in general (though I'm currently typing at my Windows 8 PC).

3) What is your favorite anime/manga/movie/TV show/book?
Anime: Genshiken
Manga: Akira or Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind
TV show: The Wire
Book. Crime and Punishment
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