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Post Reply learning to read japanese.
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28 / M / Alderaan
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Posted 4/28/14
I learned to read as I go funny enough. I can't tell you anything about the kanji, or usually even handwrite the word, but I can read most things and find the right kanji while typing. I have a good enough memory to let me get by with little effort, so I usually don't put too much effort into actual practice.

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31 / M / drivers seat
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Posted 4/28/14 , edited 4/28/14
im not there yet! lol.

i found out that hirigana can follow kanji to change the meaning. this is new info for me.
i got stuck on one char and ill see if my mom can identigfy it (kanji = chinese loan words ?)
if she can im guessing i can get a japanese equivilant.

damn, lots of underlined red words here!

edit: seems question marks are forgien. hirigaga NE seems like can be used informaly.
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Posted 4/28/14
It took my friend who knows chinese and me and a friend who both know minimal Japanese to read a few pages of Yotsubato. it was an adventure
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Posted 4/28/14

nemoskull
i found out that hirigana can follow kanji to change the meaning. this is new info for me.
i got stuck on one char and ill see if my mom can identigfy it (kanji = chinese loan words ?)
if she can im guessing i can get a japanese equivilant.
damn, lots of underlined red words here!
edit: seems question marks are forgien. hirigaga NE seems like can be used informaly.


Are you using KanjiTomo and Rikaichan? Or are you reading directly from a printed volume?

Also yes, you need to read up on your particles

か ka is the question particle found at the end of a sentence. Although it can also be found in the middle of a sentence for uses like とか or in cases like だれ and だれか where it causes it to mean "Some X" IE: Who --> Somebody (Lit: Some Who, I guess?)

とか toka is used when making a non-exhaustive listing of things (of which there may be more)
IE: I like things such as books, comics, etc. 私の好きなものは本とか漫画とか・・・

ね ne as an ending particle is used as an "informal" ending, but I think I should just stop here and let you read up on particles. There are plenty of guides out there for it.

And I guess my example of dareka fits your "hiragana following a kanji can change it" 誰か
Although I think a better way to put it would be that words won't be made up of strictly kanji or strictly hiragana. Many words use both. Many people even mix and match, or informally leave them as hiragana instead of using the kanji.

IE: 有難う ありがとう arigatou
You rarely see the kanji version used, IMHO.
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19 / M
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Posted 4/28/14
You're better off taking advice from polyglots who know how to learn languages and minimize the effort/mental strain required to do so. They tend to show uncommon wisdom in languages that most other people do not in my experience. What's most important however is finding a method that you like rather than becoming a carbon copy of someone else.

Look up:
lingq
polyglotdream
alljapaneseallthetime
fluentin3months
jalup

None of these guys have learned formally via classes yet they have achieved advanced levels of fluency in their languages much faster than people who take classes do.


Personally, I do not agree with needing flashcards or having to write stuff if you just want to read without learning to write by longhand. I hit roughly 1000 kanji in 3 months from just reading in context. At first, I was constantly forgetting them but they eventually sunk in like a delayed samurai slash. The list above includes polyglots who have learned Japanese to fluency within a few years by just reading, listening, and activating their knowledge through speaking when they feel like it. If it works for you and you like it though, then by all means go for it.
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Posted 4/28/14
The problem with only reading them though, is you will never remember how to write 95% of them then.
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19 / M
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Posted 4/28/14
"Personally, I do not agree with needing flashcards or having to write stuff if you just want to read without learning to write by longhand."


I'm happy enough with just typing. I can hardly even remember the last time I wrote in English so I can't imagine why I would want to in another language.
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Posted 4/28/14
Learning the radicals is definitely something even I still need to do. My learning was kinda half-assed, since it was spread across about 5 years, and at a Uni that only offered a "Minor track" Japanese course, so it didn't teach as quickly and the teacher I have a feeling was more lenient on stuff like pronunciation etc.
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20 / M / Stuck in Edolas
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Posted 4/28/14
i know enough japanese (spoken) to watch most anime unsubbed, SYD and irregular at magic high school are 2 of some i've had to watch subbed because the dialogue is intense. as for kanamoji i know all my hiragana and most of the katakana. as for kanji i know all 100+ n5 kanji inside and out, i know most of the n4 kanji really good, i know a couple n3, n2 and n1 at most. i can guess part of the reading of a kanji based on the radical but i sometimes have a problem when a kanji has a radical but uses it as a part instead of the radical.

For name kanji's its even harder it can be read soo many ways (like ta as da, sa as za, ki as gi...etc.) but still そら (sora) still means the same thing as ぞら (zora) (空)

as for the writing system in general ive never really tackled it seriously because 40,000+ kanji's (~2,100 commonly used) was a scary thought.

how ever if the manga raws was never a thought in my head to help me learn the writing .

i recommend if you know a good portion of the language, learn that proficiently first then learn kanji with Furigana- it can commonly be found in books made towards non fluent japanese speakers.

i also use the website romajidesu alot. it has kanji lookup by reading and radicals

The way the OP has said i am kind of excited to try that to increase my JLPT based scores and have fun doing it at the same time
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M / Buttermilk
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Posted 4/28/14
I can speak Japanese at the beginner intermediate level but I can't write for my kanji if my life depended on it.
Romaji however I can do. I will try your method.
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19 / M / Tampa, FL
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Posted 4/28/14
Can you just be my personal teacher? My life would be complete. I already know English and Portuguese and if i knew Japanese i think id be pretty satisfied (:
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17 / M / Sea of Nostalgia
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Posted 4/29/14 , edited 4/29/14
if you need a cheap dictionary, i use an app on my ipod that can translate words accurately but unfortunately not whole sentences. It's legit called "Japanese" the icon is red and has "japanese" written in kanji. It's made by renzo Inc. I just searched in on the app store, it's the 22nd app listed. Hope it helps
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20 / M / Stuck in Edolas
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Posted 4/29/14

BlackAfro wrote:

if you need a cheap dictionary, i use an app on my ipod that can translate words accurately but unfortunately not word by word. It's legit called "Japanese" the icon is red and has "japanese" written in kanji. It's made by renzo Inc. I just searched in on the app store, it's the 22nd app listed. Hope it helps :)


For anyone that does not know japan when referred to inside of japan/ written in kanji is 日本 it can be read as にほん (nihon) or にっぽん(nippon) in most cases both reading are interchangeable.
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17 / http://myanimelis...
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Posted 4/29/14
Hiiragana - easy.
Katakana - fair.
Kanji - Not too bad. Unless you're as lazy as me that is.
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19 / M
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Posted 4/29/14
I think the hardest part is remembering the readings for kanji words. Usually, I learn the meaning of a kanji first and the readings don't stick until later. When I do remember the readings, it's the first to go though I still remember the meaning of individual kanji and kanji words long after. The characters themselves don't give me the impression of hard when it comes to reading.


Apparently, a Japanese Japanese teacher says Japanese people do not remember all of the readings.
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