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Working for Microsoft or Apple.
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22 / M / New York
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Posted 5/17/14
I've been looming around jobs on the Microsoft and Apple site, and they both seem interesting. I'm not savvy with tech, 'nor am I great over the phone.

These two businesses have always caught my eye, with many opening opportunities at hand.

What do you think they're like. and if you have knowledge, please share.
Pachas 
37523 cr points
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27 / M / New York, US
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Posted 5/17/14
Huge companies like them have a lot of job opportunities besides tech, what are you studying/trained in?
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22 / M / New York
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Posted 5/17/14

Pachas wrote:

Huge companies like them have a lot of job opportunities besides tech, what are you studying/trained in?


I'm in college for Public Communications. I like to work in teams, and talk as well. To "have fun with it", but team-wise. I cannot design or preferably tinker with devices like engineers and such can, but I can offer a speaking voice to the crowd.
Posted 5/18/14
Posted 5/18/14
My brothers girlfriend started working for Apple at a higher up position and she definitely does not know much about computers and such. They are training her to at least know some things but her job doesn't exactly require it. I believe she does some kind of sales coordinating work. I wouldn't worry about it too much if you want a job at a place like that. They can find something for you if they like what you can bring to the table. Just don't turn into a snob if you get hired. His girlfriend started to act like she knew a lot more than everyone just because she finally learned what RAM stands for. >_>
Posted 5/18/14 , edited 5/18/14
Don't doubt yourself and apply when you are feeling ready to do so.
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23 / M / Ohio
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Posted 5/18/14
I think it's a great idea if you actually enjoy sales work. There is definitely money to be made and opportunities for growth in large, stable companies like that. My friend's girlfriend's sister (lol) works for Apple and she really enjoys it. She started working in the store but now she FREAKING WORKS FROM HOME. She makes pretty good money and most of her day is spent on Netflix. Lucky SOB.
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22 / M / New York
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Posted 5/18/14

TheBluu wrote:

I think it's a great idea if you actually enjoy sales work. There is definitely money to be made and opportunities for growth in large, stable companies like that. My friend's girlfriend's sister (lol) works for Apple and she really enjoys it. She started working in the store but now she FREAKING WORKS FROM HOME. She makes pretty good money and most of her day is spent on Netflix. Lucky SOB.


What kind of work does she do if she's working for Apple from her house?
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Posted 5/18/14

tf2pyros wrote:


I'm in college for Public Communications. I like to work in teams, and talk as well. To "have fun with it", but team-wise. I cannot design or preferably tinker with devices like engineers and such can, but I can offer a speaking voice to the crowd.


Apple's genius bar
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26 / M / Houma
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Posted 5/18/14

justanotherguy_2005 wrote:

My brothers girlfriend started working for Apple at a higher up position and she definitely does not know much about computers and such. They are training her to at least know some things but her job doesn't exactly require it. I believe she does some kind of sales coordinating work. I wouldn't worry about it too much if you want a job at a place like that. They can find something for you if they like what you can bring to the table. Just don't turn into a snob if you get hired. His girlfriend started to act like she knew a lot more than everyone just because she finally learned what RAM stands for. >_>


Going slightly off topic here but whatever happened to school systems teaching kids early about computers. I remember I was taught what RAM was in 1st grade (among other things), this was before computers were common in households. Wouldn't it be MORE important now to teach this stuff early? It just seems that people 20+ years older than me and 7 or more younger than me are absolutely helpless with PCs. It was very proactive of them to include this stuff but why cut it out now?
Posted 5/18/14

GreatLordBalzak wrote:


justanotherguy_2005 wrote:

My brothers girlfriend started working for Apple at a higher up position and she definitely does not know much about computers and such. They are training her to at least know some things but her job doesn't exactly require it. I believe she does some kind of sales coordinating work. I wouldn't worry about it too much if you want a job at a place like that. They can find something for you if they like what you can bring to the table. Just don't turn into a snob if you get hired. His girlfriend started to act like she knew a lot more than everyone just because she finally learned what RAM stands for. >_>


Going slightly off topic here but whatever happened to school systems teaching kids early about computers. I remember I was taught what RAM was in 1st grade (among other things), this was before computers were common in households. Wouldn't it be MORE important now to teach this stuff early? It just seems that people 20+ years older than me and 7 or more younger than me are absolutely helpless with PCs. It was very proactive of them to include this stuff but why cut it out now?


Well I never learned about it in school myself actually. I just learned on my own since I grew up with the computer, my first ever one being a gift from a teacher when I was just starting middle school, and loved it so much. Maybe it isn't a very common thing to be taught in school around here or something. The classes we did have involving computers never really went into the physical components aspect of it and just taught how to use the OS and various programs. Learning the other stuff is useful information for sure but I guess it helps keep computer repair businesses and those like them relevant if it isn't being taught.
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Posted 5/18/14
I worked as a tier-one technical adviser for Apple for quite some time. Having always been a PC person, I had no clue how to do what I wanted to do on a Mac, much less fix other people's problems all day. However, Apple does not care what your background in computers is (though it certainly helps) because they have an extensive training program. I really don't know if they still do this, but if enough people are hired on at one time, they are flown out to a two-week training camp. I was not lucky enough, so I just had six weeks of training in a classroom. The training program is very thorough and very easy. Macs, themselves, are also very easy; I have since referred to them as "Fischer-Price My First Computer." As a tier-one tech, 80% of your calls are helping eighty-year-olds set up their Mac Mail app (Apple's equivalent of Outlook Express).

Aside from the ease of getting started and the work, itself, Apple takes great care of its employees. The policies they have in place seem like they would be common sense, but you would be amazed at how many companies don't use them. All the policies are in place to not only protect Apple, but make your job a LOT less stressful. There are call metrics that you have to adhere to like average number of calls per day, average length of calls, percentage of positive feedback surveys, time spent between calls (ACW) and several others, but despite all the stuff you are graded on, they are not hard goals to meet and they are not extremely strict on meeting them (except ACW).

Had I not been terminated for missing too many days due to bronchitis, I would most likely still be happily working for them.
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23 / M / Ohio
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Posted 5/18/14

tf2pyros wrote:


TheBluu wrote:

I think it's a great idea if you actually enjoy sales work. There is definitely money to be made and opportunities for growth in large, stable companies like that. My friend's girlfriend's sister (lol) works for Apple and she really enjoys it. She started working in the store but now she FREAKING WORKS FROM HOME. She makes pretty good money and most of her day is spent on Netflix. Lucky SOB.


What kind of work does she do if she's working for Apple from her house?


She basically is tech support. But through internet chat only so no phone calls. You know those little pop ups on websites that say "we can help you! Talk to a tech now!" Or something? That's basically what she does. They paid for a MacBook for her and they pay for her internet.

She takes a chat like on average every 20 minutes. The rest of the time she just sits there on Netflix. Sometimes she won't have a chat for an entire hour, just sitting there getting paid.
Sogno- 
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Posted 5/18/14

GreatLordBalzak wrote:
It just seems that people 20+ years older than me and 7 or more younger than me are absolutely helpless with PCs. It was very proactive of them to include this stuff but why cut it out now?


my guess is the rise of ipads/tablets; any kid/teenager is a pro with a touch screen, but put them in front of a computer and they only know the basics.

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30 / M / Central KY.
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Posted 5/18/14
Working for EITHER of them sure sounds like a darned good position to Me, regarding Career.
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