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Jury Duty
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22 / M
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Posted 5/21/14 , edited 5/21/14
Once was summoned, didn't even have to go in to get out of it. I simply called them and said I would be out of town the week that they wanted me to come in.
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29 / M / Texas
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Posted 5/21/14 , edited 5/21/14
Jury Duty was awesome, I was picked to be part of a jury for a felony (choking) domestic violence case in which the alleged victim (ex-girlfriend of the accused and mother of his daughter) testified that her ex had assaulted her by restricting her breathing and attempted to rape her. The only problem was, there were no witnesses, no physical evidence of an assault of any kind taking place, and the girl's own father testified against her because she was continually making up stories to try to win custody of her daughter back...that's right, she had lost custody (in a system where women have an advantage to win custody battles) because she was a habitual drug user with no job and had a proven track record (in previous court appearances) of neglecting the child and had on at least one occasion, stabbed the guy she was now accusing with a screwdriver.

took the jury about 15 minutes to come back with not guilty, I had to sway one juror who was on the fence about the case, but because the prosecution could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a felony had taken place, we had no option but to delivery the not guilty.

all in all, 2 days well spent.
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22 / M / Texas
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Posted 5/21/14
I got summoned about 3 months ago, but the school districts in my area had a bad weather day so I didn't have to go!
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46 / M / Bay Area, CA, USA
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Posted 5/21/14
I was a juror for a 2nd degree murder case some years back. I found it to be a very interesting experience, and I've no regrets about it-- though I wouldn't exactly volunteer to do anything like it again. I was paid a princely sum of US$2.50 each day for what ended up being 12 days of trial and deliberation-- plus one free lunch on the one full day of deliberation we had. The subway to get downtown and then back home each day cost at total of US$3.00 back then. I was an employee of the state back then, and was thus actually disqualified for the full $15.00 a day (after the first day, if I recall correctly) most other jurors got! In any case, I can definitely understand why many people during the selection phase pleaded to be excused due to hardship. I got my salary as usual, but I imagine many aren't so fortunate, and if you're living hand to mouth, there's absolutely no way anyone can live on $15.00 a day (much less $2.50) in the city.

I showed up to selection in my hospital scrubs to back up my contention that being a physician and being called away from my job for jury duty might be problematic, and I actually knew the Medical Examiner who'd be testifying in the case (former classmate of mine), but that wasn't enough, and I actually got empaneled on the jury anyway. In any case, I came away actually pretty impressed by the judicial process, at least in this case. None of us on the jury exactly wanted to be there, but we all accepted that once selected, it was indeed our civic duty, and we all took it very seriously. I thought the lawyers might choose the dumbest people they could find for juries-- people they could easily sway with sophistry instead of the facts. Instead, it was a pretty remarkable group of people-- a toxicologist, a nurse, quite a number of finance and tech professionals, and so on. I think the foreman we choose among us was a pharmacist or something.

The trial phase was slow and steady, and quite methodical. No theater, no emotional pleas for the most part. We were actually told we could keep our notes after the trial (but had to return the unused portion of the provided notebook)-- unfortunately, on the last day, I forgot to take out my notes from the book-- my only regret from this experience! It would have been a nice souvenir. In deliberation, we went through the entire case from beginning to end, trying to establish first whether the prosecution made a reasonable case, and then whether the defense could provide a reasonable doubt. We deliberated for a full day, and the morning of the second day, and returned a guilty verdict. We were later informed that in fact the defendant's first trial had ended in a mistrial, with one juror holding out apparently because he/she (can't recall) "just couldn't send such a young man to jail." We were the second jury to actually hear the case. This made me feel better about our verdict-- essentially it was 23-to-1 guilty, with only one person with an unreasonable objection.

Back to the selection phase-- it was a bit frustrating to hear all the lame excuses some people had to get out of jury duty. Incidentally, a few people who just didn't even bother to show up for selection had bench warrants issued for their arrest. Of those who showed up, quite a few people clearly had no intent to ever serve earnestly. The judge was surprisingly lenient, I thought, dealing with the various excuses. She seemed to play along, and no one got slapped for contempt or anything. While this struck me initially as unfair to the rest of us who would serve if called, it's just as well the scoffers be excused-- if guilt or innocence, freedom or incarceration, or even life or death is on the line, you wouldn't want the jokers in charge of deciding this sort of thing anyway!

I'll share one funny moment, though: One guy, who clearly didn't want to serve, when asked, said something like "Unlike these other clowns (not the exact word, but something of the same tone and effect that I can't remember anymore), I am eminently qualified to serve on this jury!" They excused him right quick! I'll have to admit that was pretty clever, and kind of funny as well!
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Posted 5/22/14
I've seen grey's video, however I can also be sanctioned for mentioning that I know what it is esp. if there are other jurors around
JuJu26 
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23 / M / U.S.A.
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Posted 5/22/14
Due to being a student, I have exempted it. Although, I hear it is an interesting experience.
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24 / M / Iowa >.>
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Posted 5/22/14
I haven't been summoned yet but I not looking forward to it, I have an uncle who says he was a jury member for a murder case and he as having a great time, "like playing clue" he claims.
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U.S.
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Posted 5/22/14 , edited 5/22/14
I got paid based on the mileage.
The farther my residence is from the court, the further my pay check is. It's also based on the zipcode.

I served my jury duty for five days.
My first paycheck was for $145.20, that covered 4 days of service.
My last paycheck was $80. That's the verdict day.

Not to mention, we even got a special food treatment while discussing verdict amongst the jurors.
They served us dinner, including appetizer, main course, and desserts.

The judge was cool. He said, "I'm the judge of the law. And, you guys are the judge of the facts. You guys are important just as I do."

I like the technicalities that I learned from the experience. Like the reasons why we're taking frequent breaks or why we couldn't go to the restroom but we had to use a private restroom prepared for us instead, etc.


There's some funny scenes that I don't want to share here. I'm saving them for my comic strip.


We sentenced the felon of committing 12 out of 15 counts of crimes.
Each count is worth a minimum of 2 years in prison.



The felon is a flight risk.
Sogno- 
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Posted 5/22/14

sarrukin wrote:

Jury Duty was awesome


now that's something one doesn't hear often

Posted 5/22/14
just skip out on it, no body cares...don't worry about the warrant afterward
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31 / F
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Posted 5/22/14
I got summoned a couple years back - ended up not being picked. There's generally a large juror pool and a low chance you'll be picked. Bonus points in your favor not getting picked if you are able to answer the defense or prosecuting attorney's general questions: the cases our pool was summoned for were for traffic cases. The attorneys asked if any of us had experience in software development/testing/etc and I was immediately no longer a potential juror.
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26 / F / SoCal
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Posted 5/22/14
I've never got a Jury Duty, but my brother has. He said it sucked and all the girls got out of it by saying they are pregnant.
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23 / California
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Posted 5/22/14 , edited 5/22/14
I was summoned, and decided to push back my reporting date until I finished my school semester...

Jury selection took over a week. Out of several hundred people, I was one of the twelve left. It was a murder trial. I was there for 6 weeks. And at times it almost did turn into 12 Angry Men (a hung jury... TWICE sent back to deliberate), but you really get to know the other jurors well before deliberation, so it isn't actually that crazy. It was a once in a lifetime experience though, and I'm glad I was able to take part in it.

The experience was awesome. If it's a big case and you're mentally up for it, you should definitely go for it. But if you get there and find out it's some civil case (lawsuit), just say something stupid during voir dire and get kicked off.
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26 / M / Digiworld
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Posted 5/22/14
If you go dress up as Phoenix Wright.
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M
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Posted 5/22/14
Been summoned twice, once for a drug case and once for a robbery. Both times when the defense asked what I did for a living (investigate fraud) I was quickly struck from the roll and sent home.
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