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"No" in Romaji
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27 / M / New Jersey
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Posted 5/31/14
I've been curious about the usage of "No" in Romaji.

I am not talking about the English word no, but when I see phrases like "Kage Bunshin no Jutsu" (Shadow Clone Jutsu) or any Jutsu said in Naruto. As well as the anime "Tonari no Seki-kun: The Master of Killing Time."

Not sure why this is puzzling me more than anything else in the Japanese language, probably caused by watching so much Naruto, but I'm really curious to know.
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33 / M
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Posted 5/31/14
Do you know what "no" means in Japanese?
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Posted 5/31/14
It's basically a grammar particle that shows possession or association. Ex. Kuroko no Basuke = Kuroko's Basketball.
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27 / M / New Jersey
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Posted 5/31/14

najiru95 wrote:

It's basically a grammar particle that shows possession or association. Ex. Kuroko no Basuke = Kuroko's Basketball.


Oh that makes sense, thank you.
Posted 6/1/14
Phrase particle bakas.
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24 / M
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Posted 6/1/14
No means no. I learned the hard way.
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21 / M
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Posted 6/1/14 , edited 6/1/14
It can also be used to identify what kind of thing it is. Awkwardly described maybe but,


English book=eigo(English) no hon(book)
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19 / http://myanimelis...
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Posted 6/1/14
@RedExodus
that's kind of the same thing Najiru95 said.
Eigo no Hon - English book ; Book of English

I first learned "no" to mean "of". Which it's pretty much the same thing as apostrophe + s.

Zero no Tsukaima= Familar(tsukaima) of(no) Zero. To make it sound better, people change it to "Zero's Familiar".

Shakugan no Shana= Shana of the Flaming Eyes, I guess would be the best example in my head, since if you try to change it, it sounds worse. (Burning eyes' Shana doesn't make sense to me atleast).
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23 / California
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Posted 6/1/14 , edited 6/1/14

bathroom64 wrote:

No means no. I learned the hard way.


Considering your profile picture, I don't know whether to laugh or be disturbed.
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M / San Francisco, USA
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Posted 6/1/14
I'm guessing it has the same usage as 的 then
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36 / M / Oregon
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Posted 6/1/14

erictbar wrote:

I've been curious about the usage of "No" in Romaji.

I am not talking about the English word no, but when I see phrases like "Kage Bunshin no Jutsu" (Shadow Clone Jutsu) or any Jutsu said in Naruto. As well as the anime "Tonari no Seki-kun: The Master of Killing Time."

Not sure why this is puzzling me more than anything else in the Japanese language, probably caused by watching so much Naruto, but I'm really curious to know.


Japanese sentence structure is flipped from English. "No" in Japanese has the same purpose as "of" in English, as it can specify possession, nature, and origin.

Kimi no namae: name of yours, your name
Boku no hon: book of mine, my book
Omae no sei: fault of yours, your fault
Seigi no mikata: ally of justice
Nihonjo no kyoukashou: textbook of Japanese language, Japanese language textbook.

or with your examples:
Kage Bunshin no Jutsu
(shadow) (duplication) (of) (technique)
(technique of shadow duplication, shadow duplication technique)
Tonari no Seki-kun
(neighbor) (of) (Seki-kun)
(Seki-kun of neighbor, my neighbor, Seki-kun)
(This one is a bit tricky to explain in terms of structure. In the example of Tonari no Seki-kun, they are explaining the relationship of Seki-kun in the format of "(insert name) of (insert relationship)"; this format is used often in self-introductions and introductions between parties.)
Senpai no Suzuhara (Suzuhara, my senior)
Keiyaku Shain no Hasegawa Manami (Manami Hasegawa, contract department staff)
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25 / M / Iowa
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Posted 6/1/14
I found the thread title funny. As if Romaji = Japanese xD
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21 / M
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Posted 6/7/14

TsunLemon wrote:

@RedExodus
that's kind of the same thing Najiru95 said.
Eigo no Hon - English book ; Book of English

I first learned "no" to mean "of". Which it's pretty much the same thing as apostrophe + s.

Zero no Tsukaima= Familar(tsukaima) of(no) Zero. To make it sound better, people change it to "Zero's Familiar".

Shakugan no Shana= Shana of the Flaming Eyes, I guess would be the best example in my head, since if you try to change it, it sounds worse. (Burning eyes' Shana doesn't make sense to me atleast).


Eigo no Hon or English book actually means English textbook if you were to interpret it to English rather than a mere google translate, not books made in English. The differentiation was made by some Japanese learning blogger. I guess it takes better understanding of the language to make sense of the finer details.
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Posted 6/7/14 , edited 6/7/14
Well if you don't know the language of course it won't make sense
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19 / F
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Posted 6/7/14 , edited 6/7/14
Really helps with pronounciation, as long as you know romaji well its pretty obvious how to pronounce it. There is probably stuff on the internet and language books that help with learning romaji

If you want a short lesson in Japanese 'no' is a 'particle', quoted from Japanese for Dummies by Eriko Sato, 'no' is 's and its general function is "creates a possessive phrase or modifier phrase." eg mearii no hon=(mary's book) nihongo no hon=(a Japanese language book)
(credit to the original writer)
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