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"No" in Romaji
Posted 11/23/14
You mean "Iie"?
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Posted 11/23/14 , edited 11/23/14
Let's just have a rundown of some of the most important particles.

の = "no"; possession/ownership
は = "wa" (it's written "ha" but pronounced "wa"); general subject marker
か゛ = "ga"; introduces new subject
に = "ni" (pronounced like "knee"); indicates direction
と = "to" (pronounced like "toe"); indicates association between two or more objects or people
て゛ = "de" (pronounced "deh"); indicates location where something is happening

Edit: While we're at it, let's address "little tsu". If you see something like "くっき" that means the consonant in the second symbol is held for a second. So instead of "koo-kee" it's more like "koo-k-ee".
Posted 11/23/14

BlueOni wrote:

Edit: While we're at it, let's address "little tsu". If you see something like "くっき" that means the consonant in the second symbol is held for a second. So instead of "koo-kee" it's more like "koo-k-ee".


It would be more like "kook-kee"
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Posted 11/23/14

polarbearcafefan wrote:

I'm guessing it has the same usage as 的 then


Pretty much the same use as 的 in Chinese. 的 has a different use in Japanese.
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Posted 11/23/14

xDeadlyDollx wrote:

It would be more like "kook-kee"


Yes, you hold the consonant. If this diction makes that clearer for you lurkers out there, this is correct.
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Posted 11/23/14
have been wondering about that.
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