First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
Post Reply How about adding Japanese subs?
32170 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
40 / M / San Juan, Puerto...
Offline
Posted 1/15/17
Ok .First off Thank you for clarifying to me the issue. Changing the language changes the titles available due to the availability of subtitles for specific titles for that language and not my location I was wrong thus far. Still getting the same end result. The only way to change subs in the Android App is to change the language settings for the whole app. Would a system similar to the one in the Crunchyroll webpage be possible? One that lets you switch between available subs, or off and on, mid video. Without having to change the settings for the whole app to access the legally available subs. Similar to the one in Daisuki and Netflix apps. What are the technical hurdles to overcome? Legal hurdles?
105809 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
57 / M / U.S.A. (mid-south)
Offline
Posted 1/15/17

AlbertoJose wrote:

Would a system similar to the one in the Crunchyroll webpage be possible? One that lets you switch between available subs, or off and on, mid video. Without having to change the settings for the whole app to access the legally available subs. Similar to the one in Daisuki and Netflix apps. What are the technical hurdles to overcome? Legal hurdles?

The system on the website depends on soft subtitles, which had proved problematic for CR in the early days on mobile devices.

Certainly CR would like to be able to use soft subtitles on all devices, as that would mean only having to use one source instead of a different one for every supported subtitle language. The problem is, while soft subtitles offer flexibility, they also increase complexity in the code, and therefore the chances for something to go wrong. In contrast, hard subtitles are never-changing, which means they never disappear too soon (unless their timing was wrong to begin with), never disappear, never slip in timing, etc.. Hard subtitles also will work on any device, as they are simply part of the video. To illustrate why this is sometimes important, while newer Roku devices support subtitles, the older ones did not.

All that said, these various files do exist, so the only technical reason for CR not being able to implement a way of switching between them on a device would be if how the device operates creates an obstacle.

I wouldn't expect there to be any legal hurdles, as once again, those different subtitle language streams do exist. Only the method of accessing them would change. That said, contracts can be strange. I remember in the earlier days of Hulu, some titles wouldn't be available except via the web player. Funimation had the same issue, although I can't recall seeing much of it lately. Given that, I can't say I would be shocked if there were terms in some contracts that forbade CR from offering subtitles other than those that match the language set on the device, although that wouldn't keep me from thinking such a licensor was being rather draconian and short-sighted.


tl;dr: Can it be done? Technically, probably so. Legally, very likely. It is unlikely it would be done via soft subtitles, but instead by switching to a different stream. The issue is, do a large enough percentage of users demand it, so that it would be worth CR's investment in re-coding and re-testing apps?

10 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
24 / F
Offline
Posted 1/26/17 , edited 9/12/17

shinryou wrote:

We don't have any licenses to offer Japanese subtitles, and it is VERY unlikely for us to ever be able to acquire any such license.

Also, we're an entertainment service, not a language learning service.


What an embarrassing cop out. From a business, ethics stand point, you're are marginalizing an important number of your consumers. By saying right out you have no interest in their learning of a language, it's embarrassing. That would be the first group I would target as far as advertising and consumer out reach. People who generally purchase Crunchyroll premium subscriptions are interested in Japanese culture, and from that a genuine interest of the language is born.

Shame on you for simply dismissing a highly profitable mean of learning. Let's not forget PBS and their business model with high rating shows such as Barney, Between the Lions, Sesame Street, Reading Rainbow and etc. Not to say anime was created for education purposes or your sole purpose as an anime streaming service is to advertise learning, but why wouldn't you?

People tell me all the time I'm stupid that I pay for a Crunchroll subscription, when I can go on websites and stream anime for free. I have the subscription so I can watch anime through my AppleTV and not have to rely on the questionable ads and WiFi connection.

It's responses like this that make me seriously consider my placement in the consumer world, and how I can change it. Shame on you.
Der Zoodirektor
26015 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
35 / M / Germany
Online
Posted 1/26/17 , edited 1/26/17

Cannibalpudding wrote:

What an embarrassing cop out. From a business, ethics stand point, you're are marginalizing an important number of your consumers. By saying right out you have no interest in their learning of a language, it's embarrassing. That would be the first group I would target as far as advertising and consumer out reach. People who generally purchase Crunchyroll premium subscriptions are interested in Japanese culture, and from that a genuine interest of the language is born.

Shame on you for simply dismissing a highly profitable mean of learning. Let's not forget PBS and their business model with high rating shows such as Barney, Between the Lions, Sesame Street, Reading Rainbow and etc. Not to say anime was created for education purposes or your sole purpose as an anime streaming service is to advertise learning, but why wouldn't you?

People tell me all the time I'm stupid that I pay for a Crunchroll subscription, when I can go on websites and stream anime for free. I have the subscription so I can watch anime through my AppleTV and not have to rely on the questionable ads and WiFi connection.

It's responses like this that make me seriously consider my placement in the consumer world, and how I can change it. Shame on you.


A language learning service would require some sort curation of the content in that regard. No streaming site does that, or will ever do that. It's not limited to us.

From a learning perspective trying to learn Japanese from subtitles is not very effective, as the content is rather far from reality, both when it comes to content and how it's presented. It is much better to pick up reading skills from media that closer to real world topics and contains more commonly used phrases and words, e.g. books or newspapers.

There are various great collections of Japanese short stories out there, curated by language learning professionals, specifically arranged for Japanese reading practice. They are readily available from online book stores, even outside of Japan.

Anyone who would be able to follow Japanese subtitles at the pace of an anime dialogue should already be well capable of text production, a far better method of improving your Japanese, too.
12986 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
☆Land of sweets☆
Offline
Posted 1/26/17 , edited 9/12/17

Cannibalpudding wrote:
Let's not forget PBS and their business model with high rating shows such as Barney, Between the Lions, Sesame Street, Reading Rainbow and etc.

I certainly hope you're not implying people seriosuly watch those shows to learn English or something.

Cannibalpudding wrote:
Not to say anime was created for education purposes or your sole purpose as an anime streaming service is to advertise learning, but why wouldn't you?

the purpose of an anime streaming site is to let people stream anime. everything else is secondary.

Cannibalpudding wrote:
People tell me all the time I'm stupid that I pay for a Crunchroll subscription, when I can go on websites and stream anime for free. I have the subscription so I can watch anime through my AppleTV and not have to rely on the questionable ads and WiFi connection.

people pay for CR because it's a legit and cost-effective way of watching some of the mainstream series available.

Cannibalpudding wrote:
It's responses like this that make me seriously consider my placement in the consumer world, and how I can change it. Shame on you.

you're looking at the wrong place to learn the language. get Genki books or something.
as for trying to learn through subtitles:
subtitles are not there to help you learn the language. they are there to help people more or less understand what's happening and enjoy the show. the actual dialogue may be different to the translation by miles, especially when it involves a play in words or a joke that doesn't translate well into English. some people claim to learn Japanese from watching anime when they're just reading the body movements along with contextual cues. sure, you might eventually learn a few greeting phrases but that's pretty much it.
you certainly don't learn the conjugations used or why they were used. this is not even taking into account that the sentences used may not be appropriate in real life usage, or may be too feminine / childish.


shinryou wrote:Anyone who would be able to follow Japanese subtitles at the pace of an anime dialogue should already be well capable of text production, a far better method of improving your Japanese, too.

pretty much. the more you use the language, the better you become. the challenge is finding someone with a similar interest in learning the language and willing to learn together by exchanging conversations in Japanese. there are services that offer precisely that, such as lang-8.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.