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Thoughts on College Major
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21 / F / Diagon Alley
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Posted 6/12/14
I'm a comp sci major and as a student I can really only offer you logical advice. The first would be to take a couple of those online quizes because they do give you a good feel for what fields would best suit your personality triats. The second would be to match up not only your interest but your skills. You may be good at math but not really like it- however their may be a middle ground between what you like and what you're good at. Also, another little piece of advice, just because you see a lot of people posting about IT majors/careers doesn't mean you should pursue it blindly, as stated before research your fields of interest and understand that you don't have to know what you want to do right off the bat. Which leads to my next and last note, people change majors so often...I've yet to, but it's crossed my mind and I've seen biology majors who dreamt of marine bio switch to comp sci just as I've seen comp sci majors switch into education. It happens, you'll figure it out.
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25 / M / Take a guess
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Posted 6/12/14
Pick a major that can get you a job and a second major in something you love. Thats how I survived
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F / Bay Area
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Posted 6/12/14
Completely agree about how you went about this. My daughter is going into mechanical engineering even though she wanted to go into the field of Communications. She can also attend the school I teach at for a design degree. The reason she chose M.E. was because she could always minor in the other two. Communications is good if you know a lot about pa or work in design, otherwise too general. I teach design at two very expensive schools. Try to keep your debt down by trying things out first somewhere where you will not incur too much debt or none at all (grants, scholarships etc.). Try things out, talk to many people, even intern or get a mentor. Wish you the best!
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23 / M / Canada
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Posted 6/12/14
I'm going into a Chinese Language bachelors course next year. I'm undecided as to what I'll do with it afterwards, but the course is cheap, and I get to spend four years in China. I chose it not only for my passion for language and translation, but also because of the flexibility of the course. We'll always need translators/ ambassadors/ etc
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21 / M
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Posted 6/12/14
I'm currently a marketing major, but I honestly i'm not super passionate about it. I took it because its a practical major I can fall back on in case my plans to make a career out of the Air Force doesn't work out.

Just know that actual working experience and networking is much more likely to get you a job than a major by itself, unless its along the lines of engineering or computer science.
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Posted 6/12/14 , edited 6/12/14
It really depends on who you are and what you want.
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29 / M / A rock in the mid...
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Posted 6/12/14

TheSleepyFox wrote:

I'm going into a Chinese Language bachelors course next year. I'm undecided as to what I'll do with it afterwards, but the course is cheap, and I get to spend four years in China. I chose it not only for my passion for language and translation, but also because of the flexibility of the course. We'll always need translators/ ambassadors/ etc


Especially considering where China is heading economically.

One thing you might consider doing, you may want to minor in a specific field that you feel you might want to work as a translator in. I.e. Polit. Sci for a govt. interpreter/translator. Business if you plan to work for a corporation, or a more specific field like computer science or an engineering field if you would do technical writing translations.
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23 / M
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Posted 6/12/14 , edited 6/12/14

Ergoman37 wrote:

I plan to major in Computer Science with a concentration in Video Game Development.



I'm a 3rd year Computer Science + Game Design Dual Major and currently working for a company that's building a game. I can tell you it's really fun if you've got what it takes and are lucky enough for job opportunities flying your way. If you're good at learning programming languages, it's a great major.

But it's not all fun and games just because it's about games. Actually putting together a fully working game and programming it is a huge load of serious work. I'm talking about long, long nights, countless hours of programming and stressful debugging.

For anyone interesting in programming majors: we've got the least amount of books to worry about buying (mostly because books don't really do shit for you, and they're always outdated by the next year), and homework is almost non existant (you get about 1-2 projects per week and they take up to a day to finish if you power crunch). And exams? What exams? But you need to be able to use your brain to solve problems perfectly and be able to use a ton of logic. But again, if you've got what it takes, it's really one of the best majors and careers, especially being in this technological age.
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27 / M / Louisville, KY
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Posted 6/12/14

Arielgirl375 wrote:

so i was wondering what people on here think would be a good major to major in college and get a degree with. I am thinking about being a comunication major, right now im undeclared. I am also curious about journalism, and what they do. So what are CR people majoring in right now or planning to major in?


Communication major is for those who want to be a waiter / waitress for the rest of their lives but say they have a degree. I'm being 100% serious. It's one of the easiest degrees and the lack of job offers for such a degree shows it. If you're into journalism you don't need a college degree for that, you just need connections.

I'm double majoring in Computer Engineering & Computer Science. It's a 6 year degree if you can't take summer classes due to costs or lack of class availability, etc. They advertise 4 years but that is only if you take the maximum credits per semester and take maximum credits during the summer as well. I'm sure others can validate my statement that Engineering & Computer Science courses are extremely heavy on homework and exams. My professors if you give answer as say -6 when it should be 6 you will get NEGATIVE points with comment such as "You could have killed hundreds of people with that missing minus sign." When I started in 2009 my professor gave me that comment and made me check everything and check it again from then on lol.
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23 / M / California
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Posted 6/12/14
What can you do with a communication major?

Talk people out of suicide? That's all I can think of really.
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22 / M
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Posted 6/12/14
Communication majors are just dolled up psychology students.
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28 / M
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Posted 6/12/14
Deciding on a major at a young age is an awful ordeal considering that we are essentially asked to try and dictate the direction of our futures before our brains are fully developed. That said, I think some leniency should be afforded to the fickle, and the simplest means of exploring your options is community college. I myself went the community college route and bypassed entrance into a regionally renowned engineering school because I had a subtle change of heart, and my original commitment did not allow for students to go undeclared. I went from a physics major, to journalism, to English in the course of my experiences in community college (where it was proven without a doubt that my mind couldn't take any more calculus).
At any rate, the experiences for any degree vary wildly between institutions. The experiences others have mentioned while in pursuit of English degrees was not all that similar to my own. The programs to which I have been admitted were emphatic much more so on analysis than all else; I was even scolded for mechanically adhering to grammatical structure as an undergraduate once I moved on to university. Even now while in pursuit of an MA (one more course!), the program I am in often strays from what people would generally think to be the subjects of study. Sure, there are classes on English Medieval literature ("Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" and whatnot), Shakespeare, and both the English and American Romantics, but that hardly contains the scope of analysis for which my degrees have prepared me. In the last two years, I've written theses on: feminism and The Beatles' album A Hard Day's Night, and its positive and negative messages amidst the American upheaval for women's rights; the video game Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 3's relation to and revision of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth in Ovid's Metamorphoses; and generalized expectations of anime and how they are met/taunted in the premiere episode of The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya.
Sorry to have gone off on that tangent, but what I believe to be important is an ability to demonstrate that whatever degree you pursue is not limited to the dusty connotations of that field. Engineering and the like have a generally straightforward translation into careers; choosing a major with minor appeal likely requires you to justify your studies and prove yourself beyond its presumed bounds.
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33 / M / Baltimore, MD
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Posted 6/13/14

Riesel wrote:


mdmrn wrote:

As for me, I have a BS & MS in Chemical Engineering. It was worthwhile for me. I currently work as an environmental engineer, so my background helped me.


My friend had that as well. Apparently very few people think about taking it as lots of universities invited him, and it's usually the other way around. He's pretty smart though, even 10 years after he got his degree his maths was still really good.

Very cool. My wife's a chemical engineer too (BS/ME in the field. We met in grad school). She's currently a SAHM & tired due to the whole being pregnant with twins thing, but she too went to school for Chem Eng.

It's a tough field - and where I went to school it felt like every single class was a new chance to haze you mentally.
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33 / M / Baltimore, MD
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Posted 6/13/14

Arielgirl375 wrote:
thanks for the advice!

You're welcome. Hope it helps!
Posted 6/13/14 , edited 6/13/14

mdmrn wrote:


Riesel wrote:


mdmrn wrote:

As for me, I have a BS & MS in Chemical Engineering. It was worthwhile for me. I currently work as an environmental engineer, so my background helped me.


My friend had that as well. Apparently very few people think about taking it as lots of universities invited him, and it's usually the other way around. He's pretty smart though, even 10 years after he got his degree his maths was still really good.

Very cool. My wife's a chemical engineer too (BS/ME in the field. We met in grad school). She's currently a SAHM & tired due to the whole being pregnant with twins thing, but she too went to school for Chem Eng.

It's a tough field - and where I went to school it felt like every single class was a new chance to haze you mentally.


That sounds so peaceful. Do you two agree a lot or the opposite?

My friend's wife totally owned him.
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