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Picking names
Posted 6/13/14
How do you usually pick names to match the genre of your story, to make the names sound so nice when the story is read?
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Posted 6/13/14

bhikiragi wrote:

How do you usually pick names to match the genre of your story, to make the names sound so nice when the story is read?


. So if I am writing a fantasy I may look up names for that genre such as old english names. For one project I did I booked mark like 10 pages of Japanese, Korean etc, Keep a bookmark for the best sites. You will never run out. ALSO some names have a certain meanings have more character impact, that can make a better character. Some sites although may have a different meaning so u have to cross reference. Try to keep the names shorter its alot easier to write. So taylor your internet search and you will find what your looking for,

few examples: www.20000-names.com
http://www.behindthename.com/names/origin/old-english
www.babynames.com
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/10/baby-names-for-girls_n_4235066.html
http://www.babyzone.com/baby-names/exotic-names/

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Posted 6/23/14

bhikiragi wrote:

How do you usually pick names to match the genre of your story, to make the names sound so nice when the story is read?


I myself have found that I find names most efficiently when I discover them through a scene. I play through a scenario, usually something quite dramatic , in my mind or on a piece of paper if the helps, and have the name simply come to me through the scene. A character shouting a name, or an ominous warning written in blood. I find that I gain the purest inspiration through conflict and not through intense study.
That isn't to say, of course, that this is gospel truth. Indeed this may not work for you or anybody else for that matter, it's simply how I choose to do things.
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Posted 6/24/14
In comedies, I usually like giving characters ironic names or names that are fun to pronounce.
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櫻府
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Posted 7/1/14
It depends on what, but I normally like to pick names that fit the character, or something that might have some meaning to to them, like how Dostoyevsky did.
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Posted 7/2/14 , edited 7/2/14
Using sites like Behindthename.com helps me the most.

You can search meanings and origins and even use a random name generator there. If I'm writing a story set in Greece, I look for names that are from Greece, for example.
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Posted 7/18/14
Not only does it depend on the genre but the time and location. If it's set in modern day New York you don't want use Ancient Greek names do you? Since the two series I've been planning to write take place in the 1930's and 2014 it's a little easier as it's America so a cool or funny name doesn't have as much of an impact as the old times, nicknames on the other hand can fill that void.
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Posted 7/19/14 , edited 7/19/14

Are you implying "Kealamauloa" isn't acceptable in modern New York? Or "Uluwehi?" The Aina would be appalled!


More seriously, I tend to follow the naming conventions of where I live and look for names with meanings or allusions either toward the wishes of the character's parents or what the character desires to be known by. If it's set in a place the parents might have immigrated to, the name might either be of their original culture or of the new culture, depending on their desires. Failing everything else, a name that sounds neat (I swear that's how most people are named) or designate a theme and go from there. Time period is important as well, of course. Not many Japanese-Americans are going to knowingly give their children Japanese names during World War II, as an example.
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Posted 7/19/14
Alliterative Names is the best way to me and the easiest way for someone to remember a name

Peter Parker - Spiderman
Bilbo Baggins - Lord of the Rings
Fred Flinstone - The Flinstones
Lex Luthor - Superman
Scott Summers - X-Men
Ken Kaneki - Tokyo Ghoul

Makes it easier to pick up the names within a short time of hearing them and also remember the full name (w/ surname) for a while.
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Posted 7/24/14 , edited 7/24/14
Sorry, first post but a long time writer (it's my part time job and source of income).

Anyway, with names i used to start trying to look for names at first, but found it never really worked. In the last short story I released (local writing competition), here's how the process went.

FIRST, describe your character. What are they like? What do they do? What is their past like? What does their complexion tell you about them? I find it very hard to choose a name unless I define the character first. Now a very obvious example is like having a 2 meter tall character who is a professional assassin named "NIgel Pickles". Comes across as all wrong, much like naming the school nerd Maximum Wolfgang Bloodwurst. However, it is writing, and don't think that it might not be humorous to have the hardened hitman named "Mr. Pickles". It might play out well in the story, so be open.

SECONDLY, read many other stories with characters or simply read accounts online even (blogs, etc) and look at people's names. Some people's name's really trigger a certain kind of response in people, so it's important to take notice on how a name comes across to you. i.e. My last story was about a big eyed Japanese 25 y/o high school math teacher who's 5 ft tall, 90 lbs, who loves ice cream and jazz music. I really wanted to emphasize that she was the sort of solitary yet fun loving "cute" kind of person to be around, so after having this image in my head and looking over at my pet hamster, I just found it natural to give her (the character) the nickname "Hamster". To add "credibility" to her nickname, I gave her the last name Hampton (to make it natural to play on the nickname "Hamster") and then just recalling on women I've met that were "innocent" and fun loving, I gave her the first name "Amy". Amy Hampton is what came up, and that process came from describing just the character, and then associating how names came across to me.

And then finally, if you can't think of a name right away...don't worry. I find that often times I don't think of names immediately and need to change them sometimes too in the middle of the story. Play out your story first, and often the name will come in later.

:) Happy writing.
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Posted 7/25/14
I usually go online and search for the meaning of names depending on how I feel like the character is. Other times I just look through name sites online and see if there's anything I like.
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Posted 7/25/14
I always keep my characters unnamed unless otherwise instructed. Just my writing style.
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Beyond The Boundary
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Posted 7/30/14

JuJuRoll wrote:



baby exotic names is just so tickling...
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Beyond The Boundary
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Posted 7/30/14
The truth is... I stole names. From anything. Anime, music, japanese words. I can make names, but it would be like 100% lame or not make sense .-.
Some of God names are good, just don't use the strange ones like Pygmalion -,-
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Posted 7/31/14 , edited 7/31/14
what ouzoathena said: meaning and origins
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