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Is MAG Making the Anime/Manga Distributors shoot Themselves on the Foot
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Posted 7/31/14
I've looked in the Article that MAG is taking down illegal streaming sites all over the web. Ive been thinking that it will most likely there making the Anime/Manga Distributors shoot them selves on the foot because most of the other countries don't have access to Crunchyroll apparently, And the US consumers' population of Anime/Manga media cannot support the distributors alone, and cannot make it main stream enough through television because of a cultural barrier between the Eastern and Western cultures. Most of the population of the US only watches mainstream television, so on, the American distribution branch "Funimation" don't put ads on anything about Anime except for two Channels "Scify and "Cartoon Network (Adult Swim)". Its limited to only to the Dubbed ones, and shows appropriate enough that the FCC wouldn't knock on Adult Swim's door because of gore and the over use of the word F*ck and others inappropriate word in American television. MAG would probably make thing worse because it wouldn't make money for the Anime/Manga companies; but ending it up wasting it. The Problem to be solved is what? What can we do to stop the Anime/Manga distributors from shooting themselves on the foot before its too late?


-Kyon kun <キョン> [Admin of [email protected],for.otakus]



Article Reference:

CR:
http://www.crunchyroll.com/anime-news/2014/07/29/details-of-japanese-governments-manga-anime-guardians-project

Technology Inquirer:
http://technology.inquirer.net/37854/japanese-govt-publishers-demand-online-manga-pirates



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Oz
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Posted 7/31/14
Animation studios just need to make their own streaming websites. Problem solved. But knowing Japan they won't make use of in-show advertising, they will have some kind of purchasing model.

"We think there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem, If a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24 x 7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country 3 months after the US release, and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate's service is more valuable." - Gabe Newell
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Hideout #13
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Posted 7/31/14
That awkward feeling when you wake up in the morning and can't remember: are you Nigerian prince who needs to transfer $5 bln abroad, or are you distribution corporation who suffered $5 bln damage from pirate anime sites.
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Posted 7/31/14
I like your idea, but what about other countries, should they have licensing?


"As we all know that Anime/Manga need to have licensing on the studio's signature, in order to prevent plagiarism. So forth on having publishing companies to prove that the Studio actually made the content not other companies or an individual looking for credit nor fame. Thus Having it stream on a different country without a licence would be dangerous on Owner's produced the content, it would be more worse that piracy, it would be plagiarism. Having it stream on Publishing Companies would be better than the Anime studio's Site giving it less potent to piracy and it would give it an Ad boost on it's campaign."

Kyon Kun <キョン> [ Admin of [email protected]]



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29 / M / Indianapolis, Ind...
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Posted 7/31/14
I've got to agree with Gabe. Nobody is really going out of their way to make anime/manga more accessible worldwide. And you can't just use the language barrier issue anymore, because there are translation groups all over the world that do it for free. The ability is there, but nobody is really trying to capitalize on it.
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Online
Posted 7/31/14
They are shooting themselves in the foot in the manga and light-novels area more so than the anime area.

There are multiple legal sites for anime (depending on your country), however there is almost nothing in terms of manga/novels. Where am I supposed to go in order to read Tokyo Ghoul (read the raws waiting for the chapters to be translated) or Dorohedoro among many others. The anime issue has been slowly solving itself over the years, but manga and light-novel readers have been forced to read on these online sites for years due to there being no alternative. The other issue that often comes up is the fact that typically when something does make its way over to another country they're way behind which means everyone who would want to buy it has to wait for it to catch-up to them.
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26 / M / Socal
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Posted 7/31/14 , edited 7/31/14
"We think there is a fundamental misconception about piracy. Piracy is almost always a service problem and not a pricing problem, If a pirate offers a product anywhere in the world, 24 x 7, purchasable from the convenience of your personal computer, and the legal provider says the product is region-locked, will come to your country 3 months after the US release, and can only be purchased at a brick and mortar store, then the pirate's service is more valuable." - Gabe Newell

^ this

hands down, they need to get their shit together.

If pirates can beat you at translating, you're doing something wrong.

Also give us adult/non-adult VN, I want to read/play more.


If crunchyroll get's more manga, I won't be complaining
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17 / M / Crimson Mage Village
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Posted 7/31/14
Rather than trying to eliminate piracy altogether,
just make it a little harder.
That, and make easier regional access would be the best solution.

Forcing people will never get them to do what you want.
All they have to do is make convenience that is worth the price.


Pirates understand this, which is why they do much better than the officials themselves.
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24 / M / Scotland
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Posted 7/31/14
I think this has the possibility to kill the anime industry in Europe. We can't watch every show that comes out legally but a lot of people still buy anime DVDs and merchandise over here. Especially with manga (which is actually easier to get a hold of over here because of bookshops) things are still bought by people. I watched the Rozen Maiden anime (the original one) and loved it so I jumped at the chance to buy it on DVD. Rozen Maiden is unavailable in the UK so I couldn't watch it without piracy. Rozen maiden was my favourite anime for 2 years until SAO came out.

This problem would go away if licencing was easier but it's not. The rise of eurosceptisim will probably stop licencing becoming easier for the EU as well. Without piracy I think the only anime we'd all have heard of would be Dragonball Z - possibly Sailor Moon or Gundam if we were lucky. Without it we'd die away to that point again - with only us select few that experienced anime already. Piracy is a gateway into legal anime. It's a choice that everybody would make if licencing wasn't an issue - but it is and I doubt the political elite want to fix it.
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102 / Candyland
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Posted 7/31/14
I don't think anything is going to be solved. Piracy has always been around and always will be. Some might get into the pressure of WANTING to continue or start doing piracy with the law.

I think that it's going to be extremely hard. I hope there will new alternates {Because there are people in other countries and some anime have not been licensed} but it isn't so high.
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Posted 7/31/14 , edited 8/1/14
It's unlikely that anything will come of this unless they decide to try to make legal streaming more available/convenient.

Remember SOPA? If you don't, I don't blame you.


TripleBakaKimidori wrote:

Rather than trying to eliminate piracy altogether,
just make it a little harder.
That, and make easier regional access would be the best solution.

Forcing people will never get them to do what you want.
All they have to do is make convenience that is worth the price.


Pirates understand this, which is why they do much better than the officials themselves.


It's kind of ridiculous how almost no one understands this, because it's an excellent business opportunity.
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35 / M / Washington
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Posted 7/31/14
What would be the best business model that would work for this situation for Japan right now?


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36 / F / New Zealand
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Posted 7/31/14 , edited 7/31/14

Nerdworks wrote:

What would be the best business model that would work for this situation for Japan right now?




I think this would work for Japan (hell, this would work for the whole world with proper global licencing and online distribution options):

1. Take full advantage of online media distribution sites such as Amazon and iTunes.
They're both household names and are regularly used by people to purchase and download digital books, music and movies. In Amazon's case I think they also rent TV shows and movies to people.

2. Offer products in different formats and forms for a reasonable price.
For example manga in individual chapters at first, and released for purchase the same day as they're run in print serialization (i.e. the day that copy of Shonen Jump/Comic Birz/etc. is available in stores to purchase). Then re-released as an e-book/iBook/etc. later when the tankoubon of those chapters is available to buy in physical stores. Ways to make buying the digital tankoubon more attractive might be colour covers and colour pages that the individual chapter releases don't have or some other sort of bonus (e.g. things like the mini-comics at the end of CLAMP tankoubons, or posters or something) you don't get in the individual chapter editions or possibly even in the print editions if they really want to push the online edition of the tankoubon.

Releasing Anime as downloadable individual episodes for a reasonable price and offer them for permanent sale and download simultaneously with the initial airing/streaming of the episode. Permanent availability is so people who discover the show later on can buy and enjoy it too. If part of why people in Japan pirate is the cost of DVDs/Blu-Ray releases, having downloadable single episodes available for small amounts of yen might be more affordable and attractive for some fans than dropping a ton of cash for a DVD with something like 3 episodes on it that they might not even like if it's a blind buy.

3. Profit?


I don't know whether those companies over there will actually think of or consider these kinds of ideas or see the potential the internet has to offer beyond officially streaming episodes of shows on sites like NicoNico. Their current business model just doesn't cut it in a world that's going more digital by the day, and people want to buy products in ways that are faster and more convenient than expensive DVDs/Blu-Rays. There'll still be a market and buyers for physical products like DVDs and books, but it'll get smaller and smaller over time as more people get used to buying digital products.
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23 / F / Anime world...
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Posted 8/1/14
Some say piracy is a service problem and not a price problem.

I don't quite agree.

I live in Asia. I know it's nearer to Japan and so, shouldn't we have more legal anime? Well,not really.
In fact, in my country, piracy is a thing. Everyone does piracy. Everyone. I know it's not a good thing but it's what we do over in my country

For me, I find that the problem with piracy for anime is that :
1. Not enough legal options for people that isn't from USA.
2. Price. (I am sure that there are plenty of people willing to pay and then, there are those who aren't. so yea)
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36 / F / New Zealand
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Posted 8/1/14
I agree with piracy being a price and service problem. There's also a timing element too. Why wait months or years for something to be licenced, released at the movies or shown on TV locally (in the case of TV shows from America and the UK) when you can go online and stream or download up-to-date content?

In my country we're generally a season behind on American and UK TV shows (in Coro's case several years behind), and we get whatever anime Australia gets (which is not as much as the US) so people often pirate to be up-to-date with their favourite shows or to see a movie when it's out in the States rather than waiting months for it to be at the movies locally.
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